Exposure


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Klose

Senior Member
Feb 15, 2005
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#1
Should I over over expose my shots by 0.5eV - 1.0eV for colour film? How about BW, is 1.5eV alright? Please advise :)

Also What's the diff for the 100/200/400 if each one is over ex by 0.5 stop :think:
 

Ah_Seng

New Member
Apr 8, 2003
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Land of the woods........
#2
Hey bro,

why would you wanna over-expose your b/w film by 1.5ev? It all depends on where you're metering from and how you want that subject which you've metered to be exposed.

You could reduce your exposure by 1 stop if for example you're metering dark foliage but increase your exposure by 3 stops if metering snow. But then again, you will have to take into account the light falling on the above mentioned subjects.

Besides that, if you're using a hand-held meter, you will need to take into account the filters used and compensate for the filter.

Hence there's no hard and fast rule that you have to increase exposure by 1.5.

I hope I'm not making this confusing for you.....
 

catchlights

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Staff member
Sep 27, 2004
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Punggol, Singapore
www.foto-u.com
#3
I over exposed color negative by one stop, same as b/w negative, negative have greater exposure latitude than transparency, over exposed by one stop you still can keep the highlight details and without not losing the shadow details.

I just simply dial +1 to the exposure compensation, because most of the time I only shoot negative, and using center weighted metering, I find the color will be more saturate with over exposed the negative by one stop.

You have to run some test before you adopt this method.

Hope this help.
 

Klose

Senior Member
Feb 15, 2005
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#4
Ah_Seng said:
Hey bro,

why would you wanna over-expose your b/w film by 1.5ev? It all depends on where you're metering from and how you want that subject which you've metered to be exposed.

You could reduce your exposure by 1 stop if for example you're metering dark foliage but increase your exposure by 3 stops if metering snow. But then again, you will have to take into account the light falling on the above mentioned subjects.

Besides that, if you're using a hand-held meter, you will need to take into account the filters used and compensate for the filter.

Hence there's no hard and fast rule that you have to increase exposure by 1.5.

I hope I'm not making this confusing for you.....
Thanks bro, currently experimenting with b/w on the 50mm nice textures :D
 

Klose

Senior Member
Feb 15, 2005
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#5
catchlights said:
I over exposed color negative by one stop, same as b/w negative, negative have greater exposure latitude than transparency, over exposed by one stop you still can keep the highlight details and without not losing the shadow details.

I just simply dial +1 to the exposure compensation, because most of the time I only shoot negative, and using center weighted metering, I find the color will be more saturate with over exposed the negative by one stop.

You have to run some test before you adopt this method.

Hope this help.
Hmm I am currently shooting at 0.5eV and I find the photos rather bright when i dev them (maybe i m a gloomy person :bsmilie: )
 

Ah_Seng

New Member
Apr 8, 2003
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Land of the woods........
#6
Hmm....reading back...perhaps I had actually mis-understood your question.

I apologise if I do.

Over-exposing by 1 stop after you've gotten the correct exposure is fine. At least as a safe bet that the details are still there and able to print down.
 

Aug 20, 2004
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Serangoon Nth
#7
with negative, IMHO, 1/2 stop is 'nothing'. generally, I am very indisipline when it comes to metering, as long as it is not underexposed I let the meter run wild and concentrate on compostition (or attempt to ) - Negative is very forgiving for overexposures but once under, result will be hard to recover.

Basically, it depends on the body and film, experiment by doing bracketing- expensive but nessesary.

Fro me, I can only see any significant differecne when compensating by more than 1.5 stop. Anyway, the good/bad thing about negative is 40% of the result you see on print depends on the develpoer. So if the guy/gal screws up....welll....the next best thing is to learn to see your negatives. It does not lie about exposure errors.

DT:)
 

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