Exposure doubts


rysouke

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Apr 25, 2009
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#1
I wish to ask...when i am doing my shooting i notice sometimes some pictures taken are too bright(look fogy or pale white) and some are not .. is that normal? I always use AV mode and the exposure is zero..
 

ZerocoolAstra

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Mar 13, 2008
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#4
If the rest of your picture is ok, then the subject is brighter, and hence the metering mode is inappropriate for this application...
 

rysouke

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Apr 25, 2009
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#5
every picture seem not constant..but when i look at the histogram..alot of them are come out pretty bright..and have to adjust the tone and brightness..
 

Dream Merchant

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Jan 11, 2007
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#6
I wish to ask...when i am doing my shooting i notice sometimes some pictures taken are too bright(look fogy or pale white) and some are not .. is that normal? I always use AV mode and the exposure is zero..
Not enough details provided.

You could even be experiencing ghosting or flare. Was there any bright lights by the side or in front of you when you shot?
 

rysouke

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Apr 25, 2009
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#7
Below are the links to the orginal photo taken :

Is it due to flare or ghost?
 

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brapodam

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Jun 12, 2009
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#8
@rysouke
It happens when the camera meters at the wrong parts and think that the picture is too dark, so it wants to have a longer exposure to compensate for that. In such cases just use exposure compensation to correct it, or use manual mode.
 

aspenx

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Aug 10, 2008
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#9
It's a common problem with entry level Canon models.

You could change your metering mode to point or centre-averaging and meter the "cliff" with -0.3eV compensation.
 

ZerocoolAstra

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Mar 13, 2008
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#10
I agree... It's purely a problem with the spot/area where the metering was taken. From the EXIF, there is a huge difference in the shutter speeds (1/100 vs 1/250), accounting for more than 1 stop difference in exposure.

Someone once mentioned that even if you move the AF selection point on a Canon xxxD, the metering remains at the center.
 

rysouke

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Apr 25, 2009
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#11
As per what aspenx replied..is a common problem for entry lvl canon dslr...so for higher grade dslr wont have such problem??

as i am still trying to figure out how to use manual mode correctly..as i know i can have control over shutter speed and aperture.

For example, when i take the above landscape shoot i am in Av mode and the AF point i use is the centre one and i am using F5.6-6.3 and i focus the centre part of the picture and the exposure compensation use is EV+/-0 and the camera set the shutter speed for me.

If i use manual mode, i will still focus use the centre AF and focus the centre part of the picture, i will set the shutter speed and aperture till the exposure compensation is EV+/-0, would the result be the same??
 

ZerocoolAstra

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Mar 13, 2008
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#12
it should be the same... barring any unforseen circumstances...

actually for Nikon, even the entry-level D40 has the metering point following the AF selection point.
 

Diavonex

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Sep 23, 2008
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#13
Try switching to center-weighted metering; lock metering on the hill and re-compose.

 

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aspenx

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#14
As per what aspenx replied..is a common problem for entry lvl canon dslr...so for higher grade dslr wont have such problem??

...
Higher grade cameras have more intelligent evaluative metering systems.
BUT they are not entirely fool-proof either.

The suggestions so far work for all cameras since it's just about getting the right settings that you want manually or with compensation.
 

rysouke

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Apr 25, 2009
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#15
i see...brightness and expsoure are they the same??

cause most of my photo taken yesterday...are all too bright after tune down the brightness everything seem ok..
 

Sep 17, 2008
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#16
Below are the links to the orginal photo taken :

- this look pale white..some of the others look like this or even worse.

- this look ok.

Is it due to flare or ghost?
its neither. its the bloody sky which screwed ur metering up. dun believe just go to a beach adn shoot with evaluative. u get the same results.

use the meter. but dun judge solely on it. laern how to read a histogram and use ur eyes and compensate =.=
 

rysouke

New Member
Apr 25, 2009
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#17
ya i also think is the sky...and i want capture details of the sky in the end..all end up so bright..
 

kaixiang

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Feb 4, 2009
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#18
I spot meter the blue part of the sky if that's where I want detail and let the exposure of the other areas fall wherever they might. I have been going to xiao guilin a lot for the past few weeks so I might have met you there :D
 

Dream Merchant

Moderator
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Jan 11, 2007
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#19
It's not a matter of what camera model or how basic or sophisticated the camera's metering is even though where and how a camera meters does have significant impact on the resulting files.

It has to do with exposure values and a capturing device's dynamic range - how much bright and dark you can capture without either highlights or shadows go completely white or black.

The samples you provided also look like they were shot on dull, overcast days. Barring atmospheric factors, they could probably be improved in post if you shot in RAW.

Read up more on the BASICS of light, exposure and digital cameras if you haven't already done so.
 

rysouke

New Member
Apr 25, 2009
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#20
I spot meter the blue part of the sky if that's where I want detail and let the exposure of the other areas fall wherever they might. I have been going to xiao guilin a lot for the past few weeks so I might have met you there :D
haha..yesterday is my first visit to Xiao Guilin..however i think i will go again as i like the place there and i am looking for a place that i can do shooting for my puppets too...and that place really very suitable..
 

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