Exposure different in print and in screen


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hongwei

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Nov 9, 2006
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#1
Hi all,

I would like to check with you guys whether anyone encounter this before. I am using photoshop CS to do photo editing, but when I sent the photo for printing, it turn out that the photo on print is darker than what I have seen in my screen monitor at home.
Apparantly, the printshop and my monitor is not aligned together and it becomes what I see is not what I get.

How or what can I do to aligned them together? I heard that I can get some file from the printshop and install that at home to align ... what exactly is this and how do I go about doing it?

Thanks in advance for the help.
 

ortega

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Nov 2, 2004
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#2
you need to calibrate your monitor
and get the calabrated printer profile of their printing machine

then pray
 

hongwei

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Nov 9, 2006
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#3
oh ok ... got it will try to get from them .... thanks for the help.
 

Jan 24, 2005
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Punggol
www.fullframes.com
#4
You might get it close after calibration. but note that monitor emits light, while for print out, it is based on reflected light, so it also boils down to your personal tolerance :D
 

hongwei

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Nov 9, 2006
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#5
yes i understand, thanks for the advise.
currently, the print and my monitor is a bit too far out .... so once calibrated to get it nearer, at least better. ;)
 

hongsien

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#6
Its easier to just print a normal file from your computer at the printer you normally go, then take that print and change your monitor brightness/contrast such that it looks close to that print.......

HS
 

ortega

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Nov 2, 2004
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#7
can never be 100% the same

screen display RGB while print is roughly based on CMYK
also type of paper
type of ink
type of light you are looking at the print

and must recalibrate often, in fact everytime you change something
like chemicals, paper, ink, monitor, lightbulb, camera ... ...
 

Visuals

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Sep 7, 2006
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#8
LCD monitors are usually too bright (luminance too high) even after standard caliberation.
Which is why most professionals in the pre-press, printing industry are still using CRT monitors in order to get better screen to print accuracy.

According to colour management experts, it is necessary for us to 'mentally discount' the 'over brightness/luminance' even on a caliberated LCD.

Of course it is not very practical to return to CRT now, because it is not easy to get a good quality CRT today. Philips 22 inch and Viewsonic 22 inch are still available from local agents, but make sure good service and support are available before you commit to buying one.

It is more practical to get used to the over 'brightness/luminance' of current LCDs, and adapt to it accordingly. Perhaps in a few years time, LCD/LED technology will improve with affordable prices for us all.

Hope these helps :)
 

hongwei

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Nov 9, 2006
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#9
Its easier to just print a normal file from your computer at the printer you normally go, then take that print and change your monitor brightness/contrast such that it looks close to that print.......

HS
Thanks I think this is a more effective solution and faster too ... why I never think of that.;p
Thanks everyone here who had came and post your comments
Your help is much appreciated.

Like what some of you have mentioned, I think what I will do is just to get somewhere close is enough (cos now both of them are very out). :thumbsup:
 

hongwei

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Nov 9, 2006
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#11
LCD monitors are usually too bright (luminance too high) even after standard caliberation.
Which is why most professionals in the pre-press, printing industry are still using CRT monitors in order to get better screen to print accuracy.

According to colour management experts, it is necessary for us to 'mentally discount' the 'over brightness/luminance' even on a caliberated LCD.

Of course it is not very practical to return to CRT now, because it is not easy to get a good quality CRT today. Philips 22 inch and Viewsonic 22 inch are still available from local agents, but make sure good service and support are available before you commit to buying one.

It is more practical to get used to the over 'brightness/luminance' of current LCDs, and adapt to it accordingly. Perhaps in a few years time, LCD/LED technology will improve with affordable prices for us all.

Hope these helps :)
I agree with you ... although I have not got the calibrated profile of the printer, I tried to calibrate my LCD screen. Very difficult, to calibrate .... very limited options for me to tune my LCD screen ... haizzzzzzzz
 

photobum

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Apr 17, 2005
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#12
You can never get 100% close to the actual print, regardless of whether you are using CRT or LCD. Even my Sony Artisan is off by quite a bit. I had tried the Lacie Electron Blue 22" CRT and it was off too.

Just like 'Visuals' had mentioned, it is necessary for us to 'mentally discount' the output.

But still, a calibrated monitor is better than a uncalibrated one. Reason being that you are able to maintain consistency out of this chaos.
 

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