Expensive cameras needed for portrait photography?


Apr 12, 2008
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#1
Hi i like to take portraits and would like to move in to do portrait photography for business. I'm still working on my skills and thus currently not doing any sort of business. However I'm really thinking of heading in this portrait business direction. I'm thinking of upgrading my camera to Nikon D90. Is this camera good enough to go and do business with it or it's better for me to save and get the D300. I was also told that one reason why D300 would be better is because i can use it to substantiate the rate I'm charging.
 

catchlights

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Sep 27, 2004
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#2
what is your current camera?


IMO, at portrait photography, if my customers look at my camera/lenses instead of my works, it will be very sad. I would tell him to go somewhere else.
 

sinned79

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Jun 18, 2009
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#3
u should use your photos to impress them.
because usually ppl have this mindset , expensive camera = pro = superb photos.
 

Last edited:
May 20, 2009
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#4
u should use your photos to impress them.
because usually ppl have this mindset , expensive camera = pro = superb photos.
bro... maybe just maybe... TS are not able to produce good portrait to impress them since he is just starting out.. so he want to have expensive camera to impress them loh....;p
 

fotoudavid

Senior Member
Mar 11, 2005
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#5
Look from the clients side of perspective.
 

ortega

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Nov 2, 2004
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#6
get a medium format camera with digital back if you want to impress
or better yet a large format camera with a digital back

there are many consumers out there who also have the D90/D300/D300s/D700
 

Apr 12, 2008
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#7
hahaha...i'm not trying to impress them with an expensive camera la... What i meant was i want to do serious portrait photography since i like taking portraits. Currently i using Nikon D40. I've grown out of it. So currently thinking of either getting D90 or D300. Since i know next to nothing on the business of how portrait photography business works and what are the gears i should have, i asked what's more appropriate for me in the long run. I was wondering if anyone has done serious work with middle range cameras like the D90.
 

sfoto100

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Nov 29, 2009
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#8
this question can only be answered by those who have dealt with customers before... they will know best what the customers want...

i did heard before that customers do look at the equipments... u can't expect all customers to appreciate arts... to them who don't have an eye for good photos, i guess they are satisfied by reminding themselves that this pic is taken by a pro, using good equipment...

good is always subjective
 

catchlights

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#9
hahaha...i'm not trying to impress them with an expensive camera la... What i meant was i want to do serious portrait photography since i like taking portraits. Currently i using Nikon D40. I've grown out of it. So currently thinking of either getting D90 or D300. Since i know next to nothing on the business of how portrait photography business works and what are the gears i should have, i asked what's more appropriate for me in the long run. I was wondering if anyone has done serious work with middle range cameras like the D90.
get your feet off the ground first, you will know when to upgrade your gears.
 

May 20, 2009
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#10
get your feet off the ground first, you will know when to upgrade your gears.
yup agree with wat bro catchlight said.... who say D40 cannot take good photo of portrait?... i bet it can be done.....it really depend on the guy behind the camera ;).....
 

Apr 12, 2008
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#11
yup agree with wat bro catchlight said.... who say D40 cannot take good photo of portrait?... i bet it can be done.....it really depend on the guy behind the camera ;).....
As for me the D40 is a fantastic camera but the problem with not being able to use the AF lenses is a let down. Then D90 being able to use old lenses, if not wrong and having more commands on the button then menu plus the larger megapixel for the print size makes it ideal to use it for portrait business. haha... :)
 

fotoudavid

Senior Member
Mar 11, 2005
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#12
There are many who owns cameras, from low to high level, that is point one.

Many will say equipment not that important, it is the skills and work produced, that is point two.

Real life case:

Few years ago, i am shooting a wedding, along with a videographer. The videographer using a mid entry level set, which he recently bought, and says the same thing, shooting skills and end product tells, okay, as a photographer, i know about that, i agreed.

While shooting, really just starting to shoot, the bride's father came along, with the same set that the videographer had, and smiled.

Thru out the day, lucky not dinner, he kept saying the set was the same, how much, what can be done, he also can do etc etc......

So imagine what goes in the head of the bride, groom, sisters and brothers, including the videographer himself.

Point three, think yourself.
 

Leong23

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Oct 18, 2007
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#13
hahaha...i'm not trying to impress them with an expensive camera la... What i meant was i want to do serious portrait photography since i like taking portraits. Currently i using Nikon D40. I've grown out of it. So currently thinking of either getting D90 or D300. Since i know next to nothing on the business of how portrait photography business works and what are the gears i should have, i asked what's more appropriate for me in the long run. I was wondering if anyone has done serious work with middle range cameras like the D90.
If you had grown out of it, you will know what you want. :)
 

sfoto100

Senior Member
Nov 29, 2009
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#14
There are many who owns cameras, from low to high level, that is point one.

Many will say equipment not that important, it is the skills and work produced, that is point two.

Real life case:

Few years ago, i am shooting a wedding, along with a videographer. The videographer using a mid entry level set, which he recently bought, and says the same thing, shooting skills and end product tells, okay, as a photographer, i know about that, i agreed.

While shooting, really just starting to shoot, the bride's father came along, with the same set that the videographer had, and smiled.

Thru out the day, lucky not dinner, he kept saying the set was the same, how much, what can be done, he also can do etc etc......

So imagine what goes in the head of the bride, groom, sisters and brothers, including the videographer himself.

Point three, think yourself.


:thumbsup:

welcome to reality!!!

at the end of the day, it is how the customer sees it.

the same applies to working in a company... a worker may not perform well, but if he dress well, speaks well, has good PR skills, he leaves a better imppression on others, even though he can't perform.

there are just too many factors to consider...
 

Apr 12, 2008
262
0
0
#16
There are many who owns cameras, from low to high level, that is point one.

Many will say equipment not that important, it is the skills and work produced, that is point two.

Real life case:

Few years ago, i am shooting a wedding, along with a videographer. The videographer using a mid entry level set, which he recently bought, and says the same thing, shooting skills and end product tells, okay, as a photographer, i know about that, i agreed.

While shooting, really just starting to shoot, the bride's father came along, with the same set that the videographer had, and smiled.

Thru out the day, lucky not dinner, he kept saying the set was the same, how much, what can be done, he also can do etc etc......

So imagine what goes in the head of the bride, groom, sisters and brothers, including the videographer himself.

Point three, think yourself.
i see..haha...thanks for sharing...poor videographer..

What I'm afraid is if client see that my camera is those like entry or mid range they would think that I'm not serious or a pro. Cos now everyone carries a DSLR...haha...
 

May 20, 2009
189
0
0
#17
i see..haha...thanks for sharing...poor videographer..

What I'm afraid is if client see that my camera is those like entry or mid range they would think that I'm not serious or a pro. Cos now everyone carries a DSLR...haha...

understandable that customer might be thinking tat way... however if ur photos turn out to be great.. i doubt the customers will have any question about it right?.... let ur end results show the differents!!.. ;)
 

fotoudavid

Senior Member
Mar 11, 2005
2,158
3
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#18
The way you speak, act, dress also tells different stories, now a days, i try to wear better, including shooting in studio, as the clients now are different from the past, not they are different levels, but the clients are better informed, well behave, higher education, thus will ask for more in services.

You dun wear shorts and old t-shirts to shoot a family portraits do you??
 

sjackal

Senior Member
Jul 9, 2008
4,490
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#19
At the age of 16 many years ago, I already own a Fender Stratocaster, bought with my own money. You know how expensive these stuff are back then and only professional musicians use them.

I was an aspiring guitarists going to rock the world, except the fact that I don't know how to play it. I tried, you know, as I had tried many things in life.

Many, many years later now, I still own that great Stratocaster.

I still don't know how to play it.


Another story;

Once a Rolling Stone magazine editor/writer was interviewing a certain legendary guitarist during a sound check at one of his world tours. He started the conversation like:

"Wow that Les Paul sounds really good ehh."

The guitar hero stopped playing and asked the writer

"How does it sounds now?"


That said, IMHO, buy the best you can afford, lens priority first, then lighting equipment, then bodies.
 

Apr 12, 2008
262
0
0
#20
At the age of 16 many years ago, I already own a Fender Stratocaster, bought with my own money. You know how expensive these stuff are back then and only professional musicians use them.

I was an aspiring guitarists going to rock the world, except the fact that I don't know how to play it. I tried, you know, as I had tried many things in life.

Many, many years later now, I still own that great Stratocaster.

I still don't know how to play it.


Another story;

Once a Rolling Stone magazine editor/writer was interviewing a certain legendary guitarist during a sound check at one of his world tours. He started the conversation like:

"Wow that Les Paul sounds really good ehh."

The guitar hero stopped playing and asked the writer

"How does it sounds now?"


That said, IMHO, buy the best you can afford, lens priority first, then lighting equipment, then bodies.
i see...haha..i think the best i can afford now is the D90.
 

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