European cities hopping, which airline?


edutilos-

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Dec 28, 2010
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#2
If you are based in Europe, Ryanair and Easyjet used to be the 2 main budget airlines (at least for the UK) which you could use. Your context has not been made clear - are you going to be long-term in Europe, or are you planning a trip which covers Europe?

These 2 budget airlines are very attractive when you have the luxury of time, since they do have promotional periods where the flights are literally free within Europe, and you only pay for taxes (which aren't a lot, IIRC). Without promotions, they become noticeably less attractive and some people may consider the hassle of travelling to a more obscurely located airport (some cities have more than one, with the non-budget airlines usually being housed in the more convenient-to-access airports) not worth the savings obtained. Transportation from the usual tourist areas to the various airports is also something you should factor in.

To be up to date on what are the best options, you should ask the people you know who happen to be there long-term. Students will probably know better since they actually have extended holidays compared to working people.
 

Jan 6, 2010
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#3
If you are based in Europe, Ryanair and Easyjet used to be the 2 main budget airlines (at least for the UK) which you could use. Your context has not been made clear - are you going to be long-term in Europe, or are you planning a trip which covers Europe?

These 2 budget airlines are very attractive when you have the luxury of time, since they do have promotional periods where the flights are literally free within Europe, and you only pay for taxes (which aren't a lot, IIRC). Without promotions, they become noticeably less attractive and some people may consider the hassle of travelling to a more obscurely located airport (some cities have more than one, with the non-budget airlines usually being housed in the more convenient-to-access airports) not worth the savings obtained. Transportation from the usual tourist areas to the various airports is also something you should factor in.

To be up to date on what are the best options, you should ask the people you know who happen to be there long-term. Students will probably know better since they actually have extended holidays compared to working people.

Thanks for the reply. Planning a trip to cover Europe.

I'm wondering whether to travel by Easyjet, Eurostar or Eurorail? But for rails, wouldn't you waste time on travellnig, because the train needs to stop at the various cities.


Euro Railways - Official Site: European Rail Passes, Tickets & Reservations and Eurostar tickets
 

edutilos-

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#4
Thanks for the reply. Planning a trip to cover Europe.

I'm wondering whether to travel by Easyjet, Eurostar or Eurorail? But for rails, wouldn't you waste time on travellnig, because the train needs to stop at the various cities.


Euro Railways - Official Site: European Rail Passes, Tickets & Reservations and Eurostar tickets
I don't usually city hop, but one example where people have usually made a conscious choice to use rail is London --> Paris.

By air you fly from either Heathrow or Stansted or Gatwick or Luton (these are the usual 4) to CDG in Paris. The airports are not located within Central London and take significantly more time to get to compared to the major railway stations (King's Cross, Victoria, etc, I remember I took the Eurostar to Paris from KC both times I've been). CDG is also 30-40 minutes away by train from central Paris' Gare du Nord (main train station). Comparatively, Eurostar goes straight to Gare du Nord (or is it Gare du Lyon, in any case, you end up in central Paris).

IIRC the check-in timing for trains is also shorter. So while flight time is shorter (1 hour - 1 1/2 hour compared to 2 hour 15 minutes for Eurostar) you do risk losing some time in possible runway delays (more likely than train delays), more space is required since longer journeys in London means more vulnerability to the mercies of the London public transportation system and/or traffic.. And while the Eurostar probably costs more than a budget flight with taxes, you do have to pay for the train to and from the airports.

Most people find the Eurostar a safer bet, I guess.

You will have to do your research, I'm afraid.. Until you have a more concrete plan to make proper comparisons (if all these factors I've mentioned matter to you), there is no general right answer as to whether flights > train or vice versa. It really, really depends.
 

billcoke

New Member
Dec 12, 2009
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#5
Thanks for the feedback.

I don't usually city hop, but one example where people have usually made a conscious choice to use rail is London --> Paris.

By air you fly from either Heathrow or Stansted or Gatwick or Luton (these are the usual 4) to CDG in Paris. The airports are not located within Central London and take significantly more time to get to compared to the major railway stations (King's Cross, Victoria, etc, I remember I took the Eurostar to Paris from KC both times I've been). CDG is also 30-40 minutes away by train from central Paris' Gare du Nord (main train station). Comparatively, Eurostar goes straight to Gare du Nord (or is it Gare du Lyon, in any case, you end up in central Paris).

IIRC the check-in timing for trains is also shorter. So while flight time is shorter (1 hour - 1 1/2 hour compared to 2 hour 15 minutes for Eurostar) you do risk losing some time in possible runway delays (more likely than train delays), more space is required since longer journeys in London means more vulnerability to the mercies of the London public transportation system and/or traffic.. And while the Eurostar probably costs more than a budget flight with taxes, you do have to pay for the train to and from the airports.

Most people find the Eurostar a safer bet, I guess.

You will have to do your research, I'm afraid.. Until you have a more concrete plan to make proper comparisons (if all these factors I've mentioned matter to you), there is no general right answer as to whether flights > train or vice versa. It really, really depends.
 

shierwin

Senior Member
Dec 29, 2008
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#6
Air flights not necessary faster.
Eg; Time is needed to get to Changi Airport, wait to board, the 40min flight to KL get out and take airport transport to KL city centre. Total time at best 4hr. Bus to KL around 5hr.

Not counting airport baggage check-in and check-out are more troublesome.

Buy a EURAIL pass, hop on and off right in the city centre. Cost is firm and time is constant and consistent with delays unlikely.
 

billcoke

New Member
Dec 12, 2009
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#7
I plan to get those European prepaid 3G Data plan for my iphone but do I need to get a different sim card for each European countries? or they have a prepaid sim card that can be used for all European countries.

Which is the preferred telco in Europe?

Local, prepaid mobile broadband




I don't usually city hop, but one example where people have usually made a conscious choice to use rail is London --> Paris.

By air you fly from either Heathrow or Stansted or Gatwick or Luton (these are the usual 4) to CDG in Paris. The airports are not located within Central London and take significantly more time to get to compared to the major railway stations (King's Cross, Victoria, etc, I remember I took the Eurostar to Paris from KC both times I've been). CDG is also 30-40 minutes away by train from central Paris' Gare du Nord (main train station). Comparatively, Eurostar goes straight to Gare du Nord (or is it Gare du Lyon, in any case, you end up in central Paris).

IIRC the check-in timing for trains is also shorter. So while flight time is shorter (1 hour - 1 1/2 hour compared to 2 hour 15 minutes for Eurostar) you do risk losing some time in possible runway delays (more likely than train delays), more space is required since longer journeys in London means more vulnerability to the mercies of the London public transportation system and/or traffic.. And while the Eurostar probably costs more than a budget flight with taxes, you do have to pay for the train to and from the airports.

Most people find the Eurostar a safer bet, I guess.

You will have to do your research, I'm afraid.. Until you have a more concrete plan to make proper comparisons (if all these factors I've mentioned matter to you), there is no general right answer as to whether flights > train or vice versa. It really, really depends.
 

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edutilos-

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Dec 28, 2010
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#8
I plan to get those European prepaid 3G Data plan for my iphone but do I need to get a different sim card for each European countries? or they have a prepaid sim card that can be used for all European countries.
No. A SIM card is not like the Euro. I guess there are options but they are pretty obscure. I'm pretty sure you don't get coverage across ALL European countries, maybe a set, but definitely not ALL.

I think data over there (at least for UK) was never very cheap at least 2 years back... You can top up and get free data, I guess... But if you're a heavy user prepare to pay through the nose.

Here's a thought, you can actually try googling for information and you actually can get results: http://forums.whirlpool.net.au/archive/871977
 

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billcoke

New Member
Dec 12, 2009
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#9
Many thanks for the info. :)

No. A SIM card is not like the Euro. I guess there are options but they are pretty obscure. I'm pretty sure you don't get coverage across ALL European countries, maybe a set, but definitely not ALL.

I think data over there (at least for UK) was never very cheap at least 2 years back... You can top up and get free data, I guess... But if you're a heavy user prepare to pay through the nose.

Here's a thought, you can actually try googling for information and you actually can get results: http://forums.whirlpool.net.au/archive/871977
 

liban

New Member
Feb 8, 2011
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0
#10
For UK, you can get prepaid sim from 3 with unlimited data for £15 a month. Theres cheaper alternatives like giffgaff (£10 for unlimited data) but you need a UK address for them to mail the sim card to since they don't have physical stores.
 

Jan 6, 2010
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#11
Thanks, will check on that too.

For UK, you can get prepaid sim from 3 with unlimited data for £15 a month. Theres cheaper alternatives like giffgaff (£10 for unlimited data) but you need a UK address for them to mail the sim card to since they don't have physical stores.
 

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