Entry level DSLR?


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Jul 26, 2002
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#1
Whats a good entry level DSLR?

I currently own a 5700 and am pretty profficient with it.

The main thing thats making me want to get a DSLR is low light performance. I don't like using flash when I take photos, preferring to use whatever light available and sometimes my 5700 just frustrates me (althought I have learnt alot about coping with it)

If I get a DSLR, the first lens would definately be a 50mm f/1.8!
 

Jul 26, 2002
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#3
Hmm, I was thinking more along the lines of a DSLR with interchangable lens.

Where can I get more info about this E10/E20?
 

SzennyBoy

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#4
I don't think there is really such a thing as an "entry-level" DSLR. These DSLR will still set you back a hefty sum, be it the Canon (D30, D60, 10D, 1D, 1Ds), Nikon (D100, D1, D1H/x), Fuji (S1 Pro, S2 Pro)or Pentax (new?). And they are all very high spec bodies too!

If anything, you'll be looking at getting a second/third-hand old digital body like the Canon D30, Nikon D1 or Fuji S1 Pro. Just to give you an example, even the cheapest DSLR body from Nikon is still more expensive that their best ever SLR body... the Nikon F5!
 

hazardman

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#5
Originally posted by SzennyBoy
I don't think there is really such a thing as an "entry-level" DSLR. These DSLR will still set you back a hefty sum, be it the Canon (D30, D60, 10D, 1D, 1Ds), Nikon (D100, D1, D1H/x), Fuji (S1 Pro, S2 Pro)or Pentax (new?). And they are all very high spec bodies too!

If anything, you'll be looking at getting a second/third-hand old digital body like the Canon D30, Nikon D1 or Fuji S1 Pro. Just to give you an example, even the cheapest DSLR body from Nikon is still more expensive that their best ever SLR body... the Nikon F5!
i agree with that totally

thus, merlin, i suggest E10/20 which is e closest thing to 1. functions n feels like SLR. Cannot change lens but e basic lens covers a great range. n its not a lot much more than ur cp5700
check out e olympus section in e forum for it
 

munfai

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#6
Originally posted by Evilmerlin
I don't like using flash when I take photos, preferring to use whatever light available and sometimes my 5700 just frustrates me...
If this your only reason to purchase a DSLR, then I wouldn't recommend you taking the plunge. With a 50mm f/1.4, or even faster, you can get more handheld shots with natural lighting, but it will still frustrate you.

No matter what kind of cam you're using, a tripod is the greatest help. Flash, if used well is a remarkable tool as well.
 

Garion

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#7
Good advice from all who have replied in this thread so far. Speaking from a personal POV, I think the most important question to ask yourself before taking the plunge is,"do I really need a DSLR?" Look at where your own photographic needs and interests lie before deciding to invest in one. If you're the type who likes to shoot fast moving, action stuff like sports, motor racing etc. which require a fast focusing system or maybe wildlife/nature photography where a long range telphoto lens might come in handy, then a DSLR (probably a 2nd hand body like D30/60) would probably be a sound choice.

As SzennyBoy has pointed out, there isn't such a thing as "entry-level DSLR" at the moment...all of the DSLRs in the market now are pretty pricey...even a second hand model might set you back anywhere from 1.5 to 2.5k. And not forgetting the various lenses and accesories you would need to get....which will probably set you back by a few k more. A DSLR isn't an "all-in-one" package like a prosumer cam like the 5700. You need to invest heavily in accessories to maximise its potential.

Personally I feel that prosumer cams like the 5700, Canon G3, Fujifil S602Z are already excellent cams which have many SLR like features and can produce results close to/rivalling DSLR's perfomance. If you can look past the limitations like slow autofocus, limited reach of the lens and other not so niggling factors (like slow CF write speed etc.) and just focus on churning out good pictures using what you have (and learning along the way), I don't really see the need to upgrade to DSLR. I admit I do have equipment lust from time to time, but I just keep telling myself to try to push the limits of my cam to its max, maybe to try out new techniques of taking pictures, and learning valuable lessons along the way. And yes, you would be surprised at what a difference an external flash can do to your pics. Try it, and see the results yourself.
 

Jul 26, 2002
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#9
My thanks for all the valuable advise. Greatly appreciated.

Think I should get an external flash first then!
 

Wolfgang

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#10
Originally posted by Evilmerlin
My thanks for all the valuable advise. Greatly appreciated.

Think I should get an external flash first then!
Good choice. :) More economical and also, flash photography has it's challenges. Good to see that you responded so sensibly too. :)

Good on ya mate. Now, keep shooting and posting! :)
 

Azure

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#11
My thanks for all the valuable advise. Greatly appreciated.
Maybe you may want to consider getting on of those "specially for Nikon SB flash"? I heard from Desmond Chua that the SB80 is one such.....
Maybe he can comment...
Oi :kok:
 

D

Desmond Chua

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#12
Maybe you may want to consider getting on of those "specially for Nikon SB flash"? I heard from Desmond Chua that the SB80 is one such.....
I have yet to get myself a SB 80 so far(would love to have 1), heard that SB 30 will suit cp5700 from friends, but a camera dealer said SB 30 is not suitable for cp5700. Me confused... cuz backache lah...

Anyone care to comment...:dunno: :what:
 

mervlam

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#13
Originally posted by munfai
No matter what kind of cam you're using, a tripod is the greatest help. Flash, if used well is a remarkable tool as well.
Not really. If you are a concert photographer, using a tripod is not the way to go. What you will need is a bright lens.
 

Jul 26, 2002
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#14
Don't really need to worry about that cos I don't go to concerts that much. Maybe use a monopod?

As for the flash, I am thinking of getting the Sunpak PZ5000AF or the SB50DX. How much do these cost anyway?

I'm in Manchester now and these cost a bomb (a very big one too!) Do include the price of the 80 as well, thanks!

Oh and how does the 50 compare to the 80? I know more or less what the sunpak on is capable of (from DPReview forums) but not sure about the Nikon ones.

Thanks!
 

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