Dusty Images, Vintage Gears


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Nov 16, 2004
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I found some really old cameras stashed away in the attic,
I know that flipping the photography history books in the library will help,
but would like to ask if anyone can share their knowledge of and how these equipments work.

First up,



ROBI

a metal box clad in leather


looking through the periscope optical viewfinder
 

Nov 16, 2004
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Next,


"Tin Can-mera"
more description needed
What seems like a part of the amour of Iron Man Mk.I is actually a camera that works identical to the earlier mentioned ROBI. I call this the "Tin Can-mera" because of its appearance looking like a cuboidal tin can and since it does not have any branding on it.

from portraiture to landscape




take a look inside the periscope


hurl this and you might just kill someone
 

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Nov 16, 2004
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Next,

Kodak INSTAMATIC 50
"The World's First 126 Film Compact Point-&-Shoot Camera". The simplest camera that needs no batteries, simply snap and crank.


Definitely the mass-market 'anyone can shoot' camera of the past!
 

Dream Merchant

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Jan 11, 2007
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#4
Woah ... way cool lookin dudes!

The first two are likely rollfilm cameras using 120 or 620 film, all-mechanical affairs.

The kodak is a consumer level camera using pre-loaded cartridges, for convenience. Usually a 126 style cartridge, square format IIRC. Many of us grew up with these as the were relative affordable (read: dirt cheap) and the great grand-daddy of 'idiot-proof' point-n-shoots. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Instamatic

Unfortunately, there's a whole boat-load of similar cameras floating around so there would be little by ways of collectors' value.
 

Nov 16, 2004
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Woah ... way cool lookin dudes!

The first two are likely rollfilm cameras using 120 or 620 film, all-mechanical affairs.

The kodak is a consumer level camera using pre-loaded cartridges, for convenience. Usually a 126 style cartridge, square format IIRC. Many of us grew up with these as the were relative affordable (read: dirt cheap) and the great grand-daddy of 'idiot-proof' point-n-shoots. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Instamatic

Unfortunately, there's a whole boat-load of similar cameras floating around so there would be little by ways of collectors' value.
Thanks for the heads up.
Will look up more on rollfilm cameras.

Agree on the last point, but for me its definitely not the monetary value but the sentimental value. I will try to restore their former glory and be prepared one day when energy is depleted, these mechanical toys can still perform! :bsmilie:
 

Nov 16, 2004
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Last, a camera that captures motion!
Yes we will probably call it a videocam or camcorder, or a camera with video function.
This camera is a mechanically-operated motion picture camera which captures pictures frame by frame on film. During those days, they called it "Cine Camera" or "Super 8" or "8mm Film Camera"
.


Yashica 8-T2 Twin-Turret Cine Camera
The Yashica 8-T2 is one of the early mechanically-driven portable motion picture camera for making home videos on 8mm film. It features a twin-turret which allows 2 lenses to be mounted (lenses not shown in pictures) and easily interchanged by rotating the turret over the shutter. The 8mm film are then processed into a reel for playback on projectors.


Kids these days who have only seen modern projectors will really miss the joy of fiddling with film projectors! Physically stitching films has never been more fun! I really miss those days in the AVA group!
 

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