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Dual/Triple/more images


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stl

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#1
how to do those as mentioned? that is, in a picture, the person poses maybe 2 or more different pose... is it by using a dual image filter? but dual image filter can do 2 images only, how abt 3 or more or even 6?
 

luisg

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#2
dont know how to do it on SLR but ive tried it on digital.
DC must be in tripod and i use a remote.
ask ur model to pose 3 or more times in different location on the frame.
then cut and paste in photoshop.
 

stl

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#3
Originally posted by luisg
dont know how to do it on SLR but ive tried it on digital.
DC must be in tripod and i use a remote.
ask ur model to pose 3 or more times in different location on the frame.
then cut and paste in photoshop.
No lah... if use photoshop, it's like manipulating the photo already... it's SLR that i want lor...
 

SzennyBoy

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#5
For double or more exposures on your image, your F80 should have the "multiple exposure" button/function. When that is activated, the camera will re-load the shutter WITHOUT advancing the film, so that the next shot will be exposed onto the same frame (or all other shots until this function is switched off!).

Important note is to dial-in the relavent exposure compensation (minus EV) otherwise the overall picture will be over-exposed. Another tip is to use a tripod and a cable release. That way, when the camera is fixed in place, everything else in all the multiple exposure(s) will be in sharp focus except for the subject that is non-stationary.

Example for this can be for different views of flowing water like here on the link below with the last shot taken with 8 multiple exposures...
http://www.photo.net/photodb/folder?folder_id=176212
 

ziploc

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Jan 17, 2002
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#6
If you do it at night, you do not need to use multiple exposure to achieve multiple images in a shot. You can just use a flash capable of strobing: set the camera for long exposure (use shutter priority mode with long shutter speed), and set the flash to strobe mode with a fixed firing interval. Then just ask your subject to move while the flash is strobing. :)
 

stl

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#8
;) actually i was thinking the way to do this... here's how i think... the camera must be on tripod and shooting without the film advancing. Exposure must be compensated as well...

But how to control the exposure har? By the way, Dynax 5 has got multiple exposure?
 

TME

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#9
I thought that there is no need to compensate for exposure if your background is the same? For example u mount the camera on a tripod and then expose 4 times on the same frame. If only the subject moves in between takes, then the background is identical, would that not mean that exposure compensation is not need? This would of course mean that the background is completely still like maybe some hills in the distance. At least that is what is says in my Dynax 505si manual. Any advice?
 

#10
Originally posted by TME
I thought that there is no need to compensate for exposure if your background is the same? For example u mount the camera on a tripod and then expose 4 times on the same frame. If only the subject moves in between takes, then the background is identical, would that not mean that exposure compensation is not need? This would of course mean that the background is completely still like maybe some hills in the distance. At least that is what is says in my Dynax 505si manual. Any advice?
You need to dial in the compensation for all multiple exposures of the same scene or else the overall shot, especially the still/motionless sections of the shot will become over exposed.

Example: A 4 multiple exposure shot taken at say f/8 aperture at 1 second shutterspeed is the same as taking the same shot as one single shot at the same aperture of f/8 but at 4 seconds shutterspeed. They both give the same level of exposure on the film.
 

TME

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#11
Originally posted by SzennyBoy


You need to dial in the compensation for all multiple exposures of the same scene or else the overall shot, especially the still/motionless sections of the shot will become over exposed.

Example: A 4 multiple exposure shot taken at say f/8 aperture at 1 second shutterspeed is the same as taking the same shot as one single shot at the same aperture of f/8 but at 4 seconds shutterspeed. They both give the same level of exposure on the film.
Is that so? I will take a look at my experiment when I get my prints tomorrow.
 

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