Dry Box Humidity setting


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IntruderX

New Member
Jun 23, 2007
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#1
Greetings, I wish to know is there a correct setting for the humidity setting to your dry boxes. I have heard that if it is too dry, the rubbers (on the cam) may crack, a reasonable explanation though.

I am using a dry box with drier equipment, those that can be electically dry on the silicas type. Every effective to keep dry condition within the box and equipment. The hygrometer shows 35% RH quite constantly.

Do you guys have any idea about this?

Thank you in advance.
 

Dec 4, 2008
55
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#3
there's a manual?
if im nt wrong..most pple commented in forums that it be ard 45-55
hope this helps.
 

yipxh

New Member
Aug 4, 2008
35
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Singapore
#4
im capping mine at 45-55.
nothing wrong so far :D
takes a while to get it right.hahaha
 

ortega

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Staff member
Nov 2, 2004
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#5
mine came with a piece of paper, i suppose that is the manual
i set mine at 55% RH as mine is in an air-conditioned room

maybe i'll buy a meter and see what is the RH in my room
 

IntruderX

New Member
Jun 23, 2007
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#6
Thank you all for the informations. Surely your updates have up for me for another piece of information that i have collected.

Mine was not bought without any manual as it was bought as used item.

My dryer agent is of those reusable, electric dryer unit which i have bought from DIY shop. I will plug it onto a wall plug to make dry the silicas within then put it back to the dry box. Guess i will need to do some work to make it to give the range require.

Thank you all again. :)
 

Atlas

New Member
Jan 18, 2007
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Behind the Camera
#7
Using the silicas gel will just make the box too dry. It will keep sucking water till it can't suck anymore. It wouldn't switch off even when your dry box reach the required humidity.
Don't think it is suitable to use it.
 

zac08

Senior Member
Feb 21, 2005
11,755
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#8
Using the silicas gel will just make the box too dry. It will keep sucking water till it can't suck anymore. It wouldn't switch off even when your dry box reach the required humidity.
Don't think it is suitable to use it.
Plus... it's carcinogenic (cancer causing)
 

IntruderX

New Member
Jun 23, 2007
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#9
Hmm.... didn't know that small little droplets can cause such a high damage...
 

Jan 25, 2009
89
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#10
hi... like to know where can i get a hygrometer.. thanx in advance
 

IntruderX

New Member
Jun 23, 2007
14
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#11
I saw something similar in DIY shop (HOMEFIX) digital type. Not sure if it will suit your requirement.

Alternatively, I got mine in Carrefour for about 20+ to $30. A small black box with air-tight seal and built in analog meter. Within it, there clips to hold the silica bits in a holder.

Hope this is useful for you.
 

Jan 25, 2009
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#12
I saw something similar in DIY shop (HOMEFIX) digital type. Not sure if it will suit your requirement.

Alternatively, I got mine in Carrefour for about 20+ to $30. A small black box with air-tight seal and built in analog meter. Within it, there clips to hold the silica bits in a holder.

Hope this is useful for you.
cool thanx~~~ :):)
 

Octarine

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Staff member
Jan 3, 2008
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Pasir Ris
#13
Jan 25, 2009
89
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#14
saw one analogue one thermo-hygrometer in Home-Fix Marina Square... made of brass.. 30 bucks...
dunno how accurate it is.. so didnt purchase it..

then from couldnt find it in Carrefour Suntec..

oh well.. keep searching.. a digital one should be nice i guessed
 

Jul 25, 2008
398
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16
City area, SG
#15
My dry cabinet goes from 45% to 55% RH every 24 hours without me opening it. Is this normal or do i need to change the dehumidifying unit inside? If so, where to buy?

It's a 6 yr old, second hand dry cab.
 

Octarine

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Jan 3, 2008
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Pasir Ris
#17
My dry cabinet goes from 45% to 55% RH every 24 hours without me opening it. Is this normal or do i need to change the dehumidifying unit inside?
Since the RH is well within the recommended range I don't see a need to replace. Just monitor, that's all. You can check with the vendor whether they still offer spare parts, just to be prepared. But even if the dry unit goes down it won't spoil your equipment immediately. Enough time to look for replacement then.
 

Jul 25, 2008
398
0
16
City area, SG
#18
Since the RH is well within the recommended range I don't see a need to replace. Just monitor, that's all. You can check with the vendor whether they still offer spare parts, just to be prepared. But even if the dry unit goes down it won't spoil your equipment immediately. Enough time to look for replacement then.
Thanks for the advice. :) I was worried that the cabinet is getting too old and wasting electricity by having to dehumidify every 24 hours.
 

Octarine

Moderator
Staff member
Jan 3, 2008
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Pasir Ris
#19
Thanks for the advice. :) I was worried that the cabinet is getting too old and wasting electricity by having to dehumidify every 24 hours.
AFAIK, all cabinets run 24/7 on electricity. From your description it seems that your cabinet has a feedback loop with active control. That's even better than many simple cabinets today that have a "human feedback loop" (check and adjust). But the consumption is really low, nothing to worry. Switching off won't bring you any "Green Award" :)
 

IntruderX

New Member
Jun 23, 2007
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#20
So far my wireless dehumifier works well, too well that it brought my RH to below 40%. As recommended by fellows of 45% - 55%. I have remove the unit out from my little box. Now still maintain at 38%.... Thirsty little 'magic box'.

My air tight box is a small basic cam container bought from Carrefour, cheap and useful, with add-on dehumifying unit (abt $19) which can be dried and reused after 'dry up' by plugin it to the electrical supply, then there goes down the 'wetness' within the box again. Every economy for user whom wants to save electricity and of course unneccesary fire hazard (with extra electrical appliance running when no one at home- unlikely though). :eek:

Originally Posted by IntruderX
Hmm.... didn't know that small little droplets can cause such a high damage...

It needs less of other substances to cause cancer. Silica gel contains cobalt chloride as blue indicator. Cobalt is known to be carcinogenic. (More to read in Wikipedia, section "Biological Role")
Material Safety Data Sheet (Silica Gel)
Material Safety Data Sheet (Cobalt Chloride)
Thanks dude, informative piece of links. Surely the MSDS can let user have a better knowledge on the little bit-lets.
 

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