Dry box damage and night photography questions


MarkCYX

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Jul 18, 2013
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#1
Hello there this is my first post.

I had accidentally let my dry box drop in the floor and there's some minor internal cracking in the corner of the lid and on the box itself. However the dry box interior manage to stay at 50 (between 40-60) despite the damage, so I presume there's no leaks?

Samurai f280 iirc, blue one.

Also i got a d3200, and I want to do night panning of vehicles at high speed, but ISO3200 seems a tad too noisy and smudged up. Any recommendations for the settings?
 

Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
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#2
For the first one, seems OK, but keep an eye on it.

For the second one, I don't even use iso3200 for F1. However, the settings you need will depend on the lighting and shutter speed you need. A large-aperture lens will help you manage iso and shutter speed better.

You did not mention what lens you use.
 

MarkCYX

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Jul 18, 2013
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#3
For the first one, I've actually noticed the damage 2 days after the damage had happened, with my d3200 stored inside for at least 1 night. So if it leaks the reading will jump to be higher? I'll monitor.

I'm using the 18-55 kit lens and the d3200 is my first dslr. My first trial night paning was at ISO3200, F3.8 due to zoom in and shutter reaching at 1/50, as the velocity of the vehicle was on average of 50km/h
 

Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
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#4
For the first one, I've actually noticed the damage 2 days after the damage had happened, with my d3200 stored inside for at least 1 night. So if it leaks the reading will jump to be higher? I'll monitor.

I'm using the 18-55 kit lens and the d3200 is my first dslr. My first trial night paning was at ISO3200, F3.8 due to zoom in and shutter reaching at 1/50, as the velocity of the vehicle was on average of 50km/h
If you zoom in, it would stop down to f/5.6.

If you are happy with the 50mm focal length, I suggest a 50MM f/1.8 to allow for lower ISO. It's a nice lens for portraiture too.
 

MarkCYX

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Jul 18, 2013
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#5
If you zoom in, it would stop down to f/5.6.

If you are happy with the 50mm focal length, I suggest a 50MM f/1.8 to allow for lower ISO. It's a nice lens for portraiture too.
Hmm. My photography nature does not allow me to continuously have downtime just to switch lenses, hence I need to live with the f5.6 max and the ISO have to be bumped up.

I tried doing some daytime panning just now during lunch, the autofocus area (on Auto AF), for weird reasons the panning shot for the front of the subject is slightly blur unless I do burst shots and have one that is sharp
. Is this normal? I came from a compact with 1 AF point, and can't seem to trust my new dslr at the moment
 

Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
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#6
Hmm. My photography nature does not allow me to continuously have downtime just to switch lenses, hence I need to live with the f5.6 max and the ISO have to be bumped up.

I tried doing some daytime panning just now during lunch, the autofocus area (on Auto AF), for weird reasons the panning shot for the front of the subject is slightly blur unless I do burst shots and have one that is sharp
. Is this normal? I came from a compact with 1 AF point, and can't seem to trust my new dslr at the moment
Switching lenses is part and parcel of photography with a dslr. As for panning blur, that's due to the relative distances during the pan itself. You will need to shoot at a faster shutter speed.

It's not a matter of trusting your dslr. It's a matter of having the skill and knowledge to understand why your photos turn out that way. Can your dslr trust you to use the correct settings and technique?

Blaming your equipment for a lack of technique is sad.
 

denniskee

Senior Member
Oct 26, 2003
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#7
Hmm. My photography nature does not allow me to continuously have downtime just to switch lenses, hence I need to live with the f5.6 max and the ISO have to be bumped up.
personal opinion... sometimes when u "force" urself to go out with only a prime lens, u may find urself see thing from a different angle that u would have otherwise not explore because u have a "easy" lens (just zoom in/out).

but of cause, if u r discipline enough to go out n shoot with a zoom lens but through out the day u uses only 1 focal length will also do lar. but most will after awhile give up n start zooming.
 

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MarkCYX

New Member
Jul 18, 2013
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#8
Actually, I'm covering public buses, hence that's why I can't really go prime, as the nature of my photography/documentary involves vehicles, sometimes far and near to document them.

This is my photography page, though most of the pics were shot with a Canon SX130IS before it spoilt - facebook (dot) com (slash) busesingapore. Still looking out for a 18-105 2nd hand, and hopefully can do night panning despite the F3.5 wide aperture.

My dry box seems fine, the seal on the cover/lid was not broken Whew...only cosmetic damage T-T Accidents happen though. The dry box maintained its humidity inside between the safe level.
 

Octarine

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Jan 3, 2008
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#9
Still looking out for a 18-105 2nd hand, and hopefully can do night panning despite the F3.5 wide aperture.
Other people do, so it can't be the lens. You can have a look at the Night Photography section here.
Secondly, if you want to capture light then make sure there is some to begin with. Looks for spots with sufficient light, do enough test shots to get the exposure settings, use Manual to keep those settings (cameras get easily confused with low light conditions at night).
 

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