Do you use exposure bracketing?

Do you use exposure bracketing?


Results are only viewable after voting.

Status
Not open for further replies.

Flare

New Member
Jan 24, 2002
1,734
0
0
36
Bukit Batok West Avenue 2
public.fotki.com
#2
Well, I guess I'm too reliant on the digital format, electronic view finders and instant preview. Thus i lack the skill in exposure judgement, thus, I do bracket when I can, but usually it's more like shoot, see, reshoot and reshoot.
 

#3
Splutter said:
Hi, I was wondering if anyone really uses the exposure bracketing feature.
Yes. Yes. Yes. Both with film camera before and dslr now.

Splutter said:
Would it actually impair the exposure judgement skill of a photographer?
Why would you want to acquire "exposure judgement skill" when you could have something like 12-zone exposure evaluation these days? You're not using a prewar camera with no built-in light meter are you
:)

I rather concentrate on looking for the right subject, getting the right light on it, composing it creatively and conceptualizing it in a meaningul way.
 

May 24, 2003
334
0
16
Singapore
Visit site
#4
You need to add another option

"I shoot RAW so I don't need to do exposure bracketing."
 

clive

Senior Member
Oct 9, 2002
2,537
0
0
Visit site
#5
only when the shot is deemed 2b rather important
 

TME

Senior Member
Jan 19, 2002
6,580
0
0
41
Clementi
#6
U should include another option - "No bec I dun use slides"

Coz if using negative film, the bracketing effects are not obvious due to the wide latitude of negative film. I tried before doing a +/-1-stop 3-shot bracket and didn't see any difference when the shot was finally developed. I suppose the photo studio might have compensated for it but if it were anything as obvious as in slides (where no compnesation at the studio will be done), I would have seen it..... and I never used slides before anyway..... :)
 

Kit

Senior Member
Jan 19, 2002
11,707
42
48
42
Upper Bukit Timah
Visit site
#8
I seldom do bracketing but I do shoot contrasting scenes using various exposures to do "multiple exposure" in post editing.
 

TME

Senior Member
Jan 19, 2002
6,580
0
0
41
Clementi
#9
Kit said:
I seldom do bracketing but I do shoot contrasting scenes using various exposures to do "multiple exposure" in post editing.

Won't that be easier to bracket?
 

Kit

Senior Member
Jan 19, 2002
11,707
42
48
42
Upper Bukit Timah
Visit site
#10
They're essentially the same but for bracketing, you usually do 1 under and 1 over and the exposure differences is fixed. Sometimes I need 1 stop over, 2 stops under, etc or at times I don't even need both, just either under or over will do depending on the situation. More freedom not to use auto bracketing.
 

May 24, 2003
334
0
16
Singapore
Visit site
#11
djork said:
really? wow i didn't know that
You have about 2 stops of latitude either way with Nikon's NEF raw format. That's provided you don't blow out the highlights.
 

TME

Senior Member
Jan 19, 2002
6,580
0
0
41
Clementi
#12
Kit said:
They're essentially the same but for bracketing, you usually do 1 under and 1 over and the exposure differences is fixed. Sometimes I need 1 stop over, 2 stops under, etc or at times I don't even need both, just either under or over will do depending on the situation. More freedom not to use auto bracketing.

Hmm..... I dun think any camera has these features.... kekeke....... might be a good idea to pitch to the camera companies... :D
 

mpenza

Senior Member
Jan 18, 2002
12,938
0
0
Singapore
www.instagram.com
#13
I "burst" more often than doing exposure bracketing when the lighting conditions are not good. this helps increase the chances of getting sharp pics when I don't have a tripod with me.
 

TME

Senior Member
Jan 19, 2002
6,580
0
0
41
Clementi
#14
mpenza said:
I "burst" more often than doing exposure bracketing when the lighting conditions are not good. this helps increase the chances of getting sharp pics when I don't have a tripod with me.

Hmm... if I got DSLR will also burst mode lor.......... :D but on film very expensive to do so... thanks anyway!
 

MooEy

New Member
Feb 21, 2004
170
0
0
#15
usually i bracket only when the camera is on the tripod and i cannot be sure of the exposure. still figuring out how to use the camera auto-bracket, now just change shutter time manually.

anyway hor, negative sometimes oso need bracketing. when u shooting from behind a piece of glass(eg window) at night and u wan capture the reflection from the glass as well as the light from outside, need bracket alot, then slowly choose the one u like.

~MooEy~
 

TME

Senior Member
Jan 19, 2002
6,580
0
0
41
Clementi
#16
MooEy said:
usually i bracket only when the camera is on the tripod and i cannot be sure of the exposure. still figuring out how to use the camera auto-bracket, now just change shutter time manually.

anyway hor, negative sometimes oso need bracketing. when u shooting from behind a piece of glass(eg window) at night and u wan capture the reflection from the glass as well as the light from outside, need bracket alot, then slowly choose the one u like.

~MooEy~
Your cam should have an exposure mode that is dedicated for bracketing... look in the manual. The lower end cams have a fixed step for the bracketing e.g. +/-0.5EV, whereas the higher end ones u can set the bracketign value - +/-0.3, 0.5, 0.7, 1.0EV etc...
 

coke21

New Member
May 12, 2003
706
0
0
42
East
Visit site
#17
Think exposure bracketing is good when you first start off with the camera. It will allow you to figure out how the camera exposes etc and for you to learn how much to compensate intially.

After that, guess when you figure out how the camera responses, you can focus your attention on just taking the shot you want.

Bracketing will be expensive for film, for DSLRs, guess all you need is a bigger or more CF cards....:)
 

ST1100

Senior Member
Jun 18, 2003
1,785
0
0
Singapore, Bedok
#18
i rarely bracket, but am beginning to think it might be a good idea.

1) Backlit subjects. Moving, event-type candids. There isn't time to spot-meter, and and the degree of backlighting is constantly changing (bcoz everyone is moving around). i get around this by 'guessing' how much to over-expose. Or take a risk by taking one grey exposure and set the camera to manual.

2) Focus and recompose. Not sure about your cameras, but for mine, i'm quite sure the exposure is locked together when focus is acquired. If recomposition changes the degree of backlighting substantially, the exposure is usually out, by a lot.

Shooting RAW doesn't help much. You gain maybe 1/2 stop of detail in the highlights, but it's usually the shadows that are giving problems when backlit.
 

smallaperture

Senior Member
Jan 5, 2004
2,441
0
0
Catchment Area
#19
These days, the metering of the camera is so good that we hardly need bracketing, except for extreme contrasty situations, where some exp comp would do nicely. Often, centre-weighted or sport metering would do the trick.

In today's context, for film, you will have to change film in no time and somewhat costly. Those who do bracketing should go digital rightaway. Same thing goes for those who fires off continuously, also known as machine-gun style shooting.
 

di0nysus

New Member
Jul 15, 2003
1,009
0
0
38
m
Visit site
#20
IMO, tripod is a must.

else it'll be very difficult to merge the pictures later.
 

Status
Not open for further replies.
Top Bottom