Do you turn off your camera while changing lens?


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Dec 29, 2007
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#1
Do you turn off your camera first when you want to change the lens?

Would it spoilt the lenses if I forgotten to turn off the camera? I notice that once I mount it on the red light on the back of the camera was blinking and heard the AF was activated.
 

eosandy

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Sep 14, 2008
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#2
Do you turn off your camera first when you want to change the lens?

Would it spoilt the lenses if I forgotten to turn off the camera? I notice that once I mount it on the red light on the back of the camera was blinking and heard the AF was activated.
What does yr manual say about the model you have?

I do not switch off if need to change in a hurry, and have never had any issues at all.
 

zac08

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Feb 21, 2005
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#3
Pls do a search.

This query was discussed recently
 

bruggink

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Jul 2, 2008
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#4
It is a risk you have to take. After all, there are elctrical contacts on the lenses and cameras.

How much time can you save by not switching off your camera while changing lenses?
 

Octarine

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Jan 3, 2008
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#5
It is a risk you have to take. After all, there are elctrical contacts on the lenses and cameras.
Care to explain the risk? If there is any I'm quite sure the lawyers of Canon USA had demanded for pages of disclaimers and warning messages ...
 

biglobe

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Jun 27, 2009
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#7
Most casual users will, most photo journalists or press photographers never been bothered. I am 50-50.
i nv switch the camera off. both changing lens and mounting flash.
 

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Linnl71

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Jul 2, 2009
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#9
I always turn it off when changing lenses. One if the reason is because I change my lenses very slowly and carefully. Haha paranoid maybe..
 

biglobe

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Jun 27, 2009
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#10
everyone has their own way with things...

maybe if u feel u care about ur things.. just follow manufacturer's instructions ;)
 

Mar 1, 2009
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#12
Ermm can anyone shed light on this issue? I was told by the tech engineers that if we do not switch off the power, the static in the sensor will attract dust if we swop lenses. This will induce dust particles to be attracted to the sensor inside.
 

#13
Ermm can anyone shed light on this issue? I was told by the tech engineers that if we do not switch off the power, the static in the sensor will attract dust if we swop lenses. This will induce dust particles to be attracted to the sensor inside.
your action of mounting on the lens to the body will already push dust from the air into the body. what's the difference?
 

Aug 3, 2008
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Hougang
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#14
There are many reasons why a manufacturer states to turn your camera off before changing lenses

1. The static charge attracting dust is true. Though you might argue that while mounting the lens you're already getting some dust in the chamber. Do note that there might be a possibility that the shutter could be released accidentally and the sensor would be exposed to the whole world of dust when it's live and active.

2. The camera today is more of a computer. As with any computer peripheral, it must be deliberately designed for plug n play. I've heard cases whereby the body shut itself off when the lens was changed without turning the camera off or the VR circuitry on the lenses get spoilt due to a swap done live (http://www.bythom.com/70200VRlens.htm).

3. The moisture in the environment can cause a short circuit (least possibility) when the lens is mounted and / or an electro static discharge could harm any of the integrated circuits be it in the body or in the lens (There are metering chips / AF confirmation chips / VR Circuitry etc)

I have many friends who are professionals who seem to carry multiple bodies with different lens ranges to avoid frequent changing and when they need to, they DO turn their camera off.
 

night86mare

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Aug 25, 2006
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#17
your action of mounting on the lens to the body will already push dust from the air into the body. what's the difference?
if on, and there is movement of dust within the body, especially with introduction of new one, of course the charged sensor will attract more dust than an uncharged one.
 

lcd0189

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Nov 13, 2008
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#18
it good to turn off the equipment during lens swopping.
might never knw if there is any minor electrical discharge or due to bad contact. I experience this with 2 of my thumbdrive. in the end shortened the life of my thumdrive. So just b safe i power off my cam while changing lens. 2 costly for mistake.
 

Octarine

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#19
Do note that there might be a possibility that the shutter could be released accidentally and the sensor would be exposed to the whole world of dust when it's live and active.
Sounds really scary, right? :bsmilie: It doesn't matter much of you 'load' the dust into the camera during lens change and it get's to the sensor later compared to what you describe. I have changed my lenses many times without having a dust disaster on my sensor. Occasionally I check and give it a blow of air, that's it. Will have a look at wet cleaning solutions later. For changing lenses, sometimes I switched off the cam, sometimes not. Since I only have one digital body it just has to be done quickly sometimes. I'm glad that cameras are able to take this.

3. The moisture in the environment can cause a short circuit (least possibility) when the lens is mounted and / or an electro static discharge could harm any of the integrated circuits be it in the body or in the lens (There are metering chips / AF confirmation chips / VR Circuitry etc)
It needs more than 80% RH to cause short circuits on PCB's. Those elements that are really sensitive are enclosed and sealed anyway. On the other hand: static charges rather build up in dry air, provided the right materials are present. Humid air will support the slow equalization of any charges. Secondly, camera engineers have done their homework, too. Today, cameras are dangling around necks and rubbing against t-shirts and dresses of all kinds of material. Chances for electrostatic charges to build up are quite good - but nothing happens. ;)

I have many friends who are professionals who seem to carry multiple bodies with different lens ranges to avoid frequent changing and when they need to, they DO turn their camera off.
Changing lenses also takes time - that seems to me the most obvious reason for having two bodies. With two bodies you simply use the one with the lens fitting best to the situation. Otherwise the moment is gone. The other idea behind this is to have a backup system.

I'm not against being careful with equipment. For most of us it's a lot of money. But dust is nothing to be scared about and get sleppless nights. It was there, it is there, it will be there.
 

Aug 3, 2008
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Hougang
www.geekbrains.com
#20
I guess many here forget that Prevention is better than cure...When I spoke about probable Short Circuits and Static Discharge, these are possible under extreme conditions and the manfacturer advises you to be careful by turning off the camera to avoid those extreme conditions. Don't say that you never take your camera out in an extremely humid environment (My Hygrometer reads 73% RH in my non Air Con room currently).
 

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