do you meter when you use flash??


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bokeh1.8

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Jul 6, 2006
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#1
Hi guys.. been a while since I have posted in this corner liaox.. I was shooting when I had the following question:

  1. I would like to know if you 'zero-in' a meter when you shoot with a flashgun.. or do you compensate??
  2. how does manual flash compensation work??

ha ha.. pardon my ignorance.. thanks in advance!! :bsmilie:

regards,
bokeh1.8
 

photobum

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Apr 17, 2005
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#2
I would like to know if you 'zero-in' a meter when you shoot with a flashgun.. or do you compensate??
  • Depending on what subject I am shooting, and the camera I am using. Most of the time, I compensate about a third of a stop.
how does manual flash compensation work??
  • Read your manual.
 

Aug 20, 2004
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Serangoon Nth
#3
On-camera metering is to control the amount of ambient lightyou want to end up with. The flash exposure is determined by the aperture only, nothing to do with the shutter speed - as long as your are still synced.

Flash compensation is adjusting the +/- according to the color of the point just prioir releasing the shutter. AF lock and recompose technique is usually the one main factgor in getting the wrong flash output.

If subject is white, then add at least 1.5 stop. If subject is dark, the, -1 to 1.5 stop.

This is very generinc for flash photogy.

Hoep this helps.

DT :)
 

MDZ2

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Feb 23, 2005
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Eastern Part
#4
As mentioned above, flash exposure is affected only by the aperture. So to either underexpose of over, you must first get the correct aperture for the subject distance on the table that is either printed on your flash or in the manual. Then its just a simple matter of closing the aperture to reduce the exposure or vice versa.
 

Artosoft

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Aug 31, 2005
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Tanjong Katong
#5
MDZ2 said:
As mentioned above, flash exposure is affected only by the aperture. So to either underexpose of over, you must first get the correct aperture for the subject distance on the table that is either printed on your flash or in the manual. Then its just a simple matter of closing the aperture to reduce the exposure or vice versa.
Pardon me, above is if you do manual flash mode.

AFAIK, the flash itself can control its flash's duration in order to overexposure or underexposure (ok, if it is max already, can not overexposure anymore). The overexposure or underexposure by flash doesn't change the camera's aperture.

Regards,
Arto.
 

ricohflex

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Feb 24, 2005
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#6
There is such a thing as a flash meter which I use, normally with studio flash.
 

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