Do u agree with this?


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jsbn

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#1
"I show courtesty to another elderly. But I don't respect him/her till he has some experience or had done something worthy of my respect"

Dun mistaken me to be the believer of some obscure, twisted, decadent Western teaching. But when I was on the bus juz now, I saw an old lady scolding another young guy, calling him "not educated" and "his mother never teach him [to respect elders, so goes the Confucian saying]"

Makes me wonder, does age automatic guarantee u this word 'respect'?

Wad are u guys opinion of this?
 

roninwolf

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#2
how about "giving someone his due respect as a fellow human being till he has done something that throws this respect away"
 

jsbn

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#3
Originally posted by roninwolf
how about "giving someone his due respect as a fellow human being till he has done something that throws this respect away"
Hmm... The basic underlying ego & dignity of all human beings.

Makes me wonder abt alot of things.... :light:
 

#4
Originally posted by jsbn
"I show courtesty to another elderly. But I don't respect him/her till he has some experience or had done something worthy of my respect"

Dun mistaken me to be the believer of some obscure, twisted, decadent Western teaching. But when I was on the bus juz now, I saw an old lady scolding another young guy, calling him "not educated" and "his mother never teach him [to respect elders, so goes the Confucian saying]"

Makes me wonder, does age automatic guarantee u this word 'respect'?

Wad are u guys opinion of this?
I would look at this from the asians' culture point of view. In asians' context, it is grilled into our seniors' minds that to respect your seniors. Remember how these teachings were imparted to us in the good old days where your teacher taught/nagged to you to respect your elders with no questions asked or how your parents taught you to respect your teachers without displaying resistances. Contravening this would result in some scolding or spanking somehow? However, they didn't teach you to respect the juniors, right? Guess this means age do guarantee respect.

For the younger generations, it's the principle that no matter who you are, you must earn my respect first before reciprocate. At the extreme, any sight disrespect given would result in a enemy created regardless who you are, how old you are and what you are.

To me, its not a matter of respect but a ego problem. By the way, does this saying sounds familiar - " While you do not respect your superior, you would still have to respect the chair he/she sits on"

My Rs1 worth.
 

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#5
Originally posted by Nospeech
"While you do not respect your superior, you would still have to respect the chair he/she sits on"
In the army, this sentence would be translated as "Don't respect me nevermind, but must respect my rank !" :bsmilie:
 

hongsien

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#6
I think it is a misunderstanding of Confusius teachings which Asians were and are still following. What he meant was that, yes, younger people has to respect elders, but it is reciprocal: elders also have to respect younger people, and the latter is what most people easily forget or were not told when they were young......

Hong Sien
 

hongsien

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#7
To me I will respect a person first no matter of the age (I think you mean in the case when you don't know the person), then I will relook if that person's actions justify my respect for him/her by observing their actions. But don't forget, there are no perfect human beings............so have some leeway, it all depends on the situation too

Hong Sien
 

chpeck

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#8
Very often the truly uneducated people are the ones who would blame other for being "not educated" when they are annoyed.

I do agree that old age does not automatic warrant respect by the younger but I would not jump to conclusion of thinking that the old person was wrong.

The whole event would take ten of thousands of words to describe and probably a whole panel of judges to decide who was right or wrong.

As for the understanding of respect in the SAF, I remember once I was told in a lift by a Major that I did not have to respect her but, very importantly, I must not forget to respect her rank.
 

espn

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#9
You want respect, you earn it. If you can respect me, I'll respect you back.

Don't throw your seniority shit at me, I don't give a damn, if you can't do a single thing requested, then you suck, and if you suck, you don't deserve my respect.

This is the real world we're talking about, not in the army, where any Maj, LTC, COL just comes along and you have no choice but to respect them, cos of their 'seniority' in ranks.

Courtesy is politeness, that's something everybody should get. I believe in that. But respect wise, I would require more evidence that he/she deserves my respect before I would show and give any.

Age doesn't go ratioed with respect. Older doesn't mean more respect. I've had elderlies just cut my queues and scream and shout at me just because I told them off. Elderness isn't everything. If that's the case I can cut a primary school kid's queue and scream and shout and make a fool out of myself.

Old folks can't see that we show courtesy to them for their age, they're afraid that we can't see that they're old and then they start to throw their weight around to get the attention and thus loses our respect for them.
 

rapidmax

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#10
I think it is disrespect to what Confucius or any great philosopher maybe have taught to assume that it is biased towards a segment of the population because of age. Both ways should work.

However, if you say that if you respect me I respect you, and everyone says the same, then where do we start?

My take is that as long as you haven't done anything to me, I shall respect you. So here, I start first, you follow, we continue; you do not follow, I stop respecting you.

Any great philosophers would probably teach respect for the next guy, and I really wonder how they managed to actually put age (sometimes a couple of years) in the equation.

I still remember those guys in orientation in hall who would ask us freshies if it's like that that we respect our seniors - well, did you do anything to earn the kind of respect you anticipate? I barely know you and you haven't done anything that shows that you deserve not respect here but privileges.

Anyway, elderlies like youngsters are not entitled to more respect than anyone. Some elderlies have done things that are not so respectful, so how can they expect respect? But then again, who are we to judge?

Dilemma... :dunno:
 

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#11
Well the asian's value, as imparted to us, is to respect the elders. Full stop. No buts or ifs.

But let me tell you what I've seen in Australia. Hong Kong people SCOLDING the elders (parents presumably) during yum cha, in full view of everyone. Maybe the Hong Kees are not "asians" per se. It happens so often.:dunno:

In the western world, age does not equal to respect. Full stop. It may be a good thing - elders won't abuse the "respect" privilege that easily.

But I rather prefer the asian's concept.
 

jsbn

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#12
Originally posted by randomwalk
Well the asian's value, as imparted to us, is to respect the elders. Full stop. No buts or ifs.

But let me tell you what I've seen in Australia. Hong Kong people SCOLDING the elders (parents presumably) during yum cha, in full view of everyone. Maybe the Hong Kees are not "asians" per se. It happens so often.:dunno:

In the western world, age does not equal to respect. Full stop. It may be a good thing - elders won't abuse the "respect" privilege that easily.

But I rather prefer the asian's concept.
Hmm... Perhaps I believe in this 'twisted, decadent, evil' teachings of the West. That age does not equate to wisdom or respect.

I'd read that the English (in good ol' England) used to attend Court sessions wearing white wigs, Queen Victoria used to attend Court sessions with white wigs and even as now Judges are putting on white wigs. The idea of putting on white wigs comes frm the belief that 'white hair = sign of wisdom'.

Perhaps judges of now are juz following tradition. But this is wad I'd read anyway.

Back to topic. We see chee ko pehs molesting women (these ppl are in the minority) and some ppl, way past the age of retirement, commit crimes, etc.

It's the 21st century. Personally, ancient Confucian values and philosophy serves as a guide to bettering one's life. But den the ancient saying of: "Respecting ur elders" and the good ol' English tradition that age (symbolised by the white 'hair') equates wisdom doesn't really seem applicable now.
 

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