DLSR on kayak


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May 5, 2006
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#1
Hi Guys,

I'm going to some resort island and it requires kayaking to explore the 25 small islands. Is it a good idea to carry the DSLR while kayaking? Bear with me as I never tried kayaing before :)

rgds,
/Mark
 

Jun 25, 2008
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Pasir Ris
#2
NO. DON'T EVER BRING YOUR DSLR KAYAKING. unless you get an underwater housing for it. and even then make sure it's securely attached to you at all times by bungee cord, so if you capsize it doesn't do a titanic and break your heart (not to mention your wallet)
 

giantcanopy

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Feb 11, 2007
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#3
Erh then i think nope.

You should try kayaking and see. I enjoyed both canoeing and kayaking previously but I wouldn bring one along ( not even with an underwater casing - maybe because i am not that zai .. )

- Not easy getting in / out, unlike a spacious canoe, and when capsize i am pretty sure i wouldn want to care for an additional burden
- Space is a premium after ur legs fill the floor.
- Sitting is much lower , gives u more stability in choppy waters but also means water splashes more easily.

But you r good u should not flip too easily in choppy waters compared to a canoe.

Ryan
 

Dream Merchant

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Jan 11, 2007
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#5
Hi Guys,

I'm going to some resort island and it requires kayaking to explore the 25 small islands. Is it a good idea to carry the DSLR while kayaking? Bear with me as I never tried kayaing before :)

rgds,
/Mark
Please don't get offended, but if you've never kayaked before, forget about shooting and concentrate fully on your own safety first. With a camera on-board, you'll be constantly distracted by thoughts about water leakage and scenes/angles and technicalities.
 

#7
Please don't get offended, but if you've never kayaked before, forget about shooting and concentrate fully on your own safety first. With a camera on-board, you'll be constantly distracted by thoughts about water leakage and scenes/angles and technicalities.
I second this. Was a sea scout previously and if you have not kayak before and especially you are doing a single seater. Balance is essential. And if you are going island hopping...you are pretty out at sea. Choppy waters, hidden currents and inexperiences with a kayak will result is a lot of overturning and lost of control in steering with the pedal while maintain balance. You CAN do worst then losing your camera to the sea or dipping it in salt water. You could lose your life if you are not experience...life jacket or no life jacket. Overturn in just 6 feet of water and you don't get out of your kayak fast enough and you panic is not a thing...so imagine further out at sea.

If you are simply carrying your camera to shoot once you are on the island that is find. Wrap it up in a a few strong plastic bags if you are bringing a DSLR and other gear. It would be bulky but best would be something water proof or small and easy to enclose in a water proof bag and then place it inside the kayak where it can be secure to something so if it over turns you don't lose the camera and whatever gear you have with you. THe idea is keep your stuff small and light and if the kayak has a seat cover even better. It will help to some extend.

Kayak tend to be more tricky then say a canoe. A twin seater canoe is alot more stable as the bottom tend to be flatter. But a kayak's bottom is more rounded and has a tendency to roll easier but then it was built for speed, nimble manoeuvrings and hit by a wave from the side it can tip you over easy if you don't know how to use the paddle to offset it. Something to keep in mind and you should google it and read up on it rather then just go there and start a crash course. This can mentally prepare you for what's to come and you will find you have more control mentally and mindful when you are doing it.
 

Jul 27, 2007
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#8
Please don't get offended, but if you've never kayaked before, forget about shooting and concentrate fully on your own safety first. With a camera on-board, you'll be constantly distracted by thoughts about water leakage and scenes/angles and technicalities.
second-ed too. safety first. but a small waterproof digicam wont hurt.
 

jacob

Deregistered
May 11, 2005
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#10
For activities like this, I recommend the Olympus Mju 1030 SW to you.... keep your DSLR at home.
i SECOND that! however most important is safety. you may have captures lots of good pictures but not here to show, how?

(this is not a curse but to alert you of safety)
 

Youhong

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Dec 30, 2004
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#11
Get a waterproof-housing and NOT waterproof bag. I've lost one digital camera (Canon Powershot A10) because the seawater gets in.

I recommend disposable film cameras. Kodak has one that is waterproof and shock proof one. You do not need to attach it with any floats as it will float by its own. You can just clip it to yourself with a karabiner.
 

sohzai

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Feb 27, 2003
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#12
Hi...

DSLR - No. Reason? Kayaking needs the person to be nimble and fast. Lug a weight around not only spoils the fun, but also proves to be rather dangerous, especially when you capsize. It also depends what kind of kayak you are using. If you are using dancers, which are more rounded, you will capsize easily especially when you are new to the sport. But if you are using those fibreglass, rather flat bottom ones, they are rather stable.

Compact, yes but you need to find the right waterproof bag to wrap it. I think a underwatercasing will be bulky. There are good waterproof bags around that can withstand sea-use. Example: I put my mobile using ziplocks (yes...ziplocks and they are good quality ones..)from sheares technology. They are good up to a certain depth..definitely no problem cause I don't see why you will sink to ungodly depths. They are relatively cheap as compared to those bags meant for camera underwater use. Say 1 that can put a compact camera in, probably around 10+ at max. Worried? 2 layers will ensure nothing gets in no matter what.

Where to keep the camera? I used to carry a waterbag to hydrate myself well at sea. Attaching a side pouch to the bag strap (so it ends up somewhere near your chest) will be convenient and makes sure the camera is not in your way at anytime. Or, place the camera carabiner-ed to you between your legs. I presume you will have skirting over the kayak, thus losing it should not be a problem. Carabiner will help you not lose your camera even if you capsize.

lastly, enjoy the sport...since you are new, you may have trouble catching up with others..taking pictures at the wrong time will only give you more problems.

Hope this helps!
 

kal-el

New Member
Sep 13, 2007
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#13
Actually if the kayak comes with a spray skirt water proof your camera in a baja bag would do fine.

but if it is your first time forget about it when it comes to canoeing even with like 12 yrs of experience i will never say my kayak would not capsize or get wet.
 

night86mare

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Aug 25, 2006
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#14
depends on your kayak, and your skill level, and the sea condition.

there is always risk in everything we do. for example, if i walk out, for all i know when i am shooting suddenly someone from the 8th floor will pour 10 litres of water on me and my camera. of course the risk is low, the kayak risk is higher, but it's always about weighing your options to see if it's worth it.
 

zac08

Senior Member
Feb 21, 2005
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#15
NOT a good idea...

I've done kayaking around SG before and even in local calm waters, its not really safe.

So better to get equipment which can get wet or lost. Things can get lost when you accidentally capsize.
 

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