Diopter Issues


tbc666

New Member
Sep 10, 2009
58
0
0
#1
Dear experts,

I would like some advice. I am new to DSLR and using a Nikon D300s. As per manual to adjust the diopter, I found that when focus is locked on and I adjusted the diopter to clockwise maximum its almost sharp (I presumed) but I have a feeling it could be sharper but I can't find out since its at the maximum. The manual suggested getting the DK-20C to further compensate. What's your expert advice?

I mostly shoot on tripod and manual focus but the shots came out not sharp even when subject is within 10 meters range. Most probably one in a hundred is sharp. Is this diopter issue the cause? Where can I purchase the recommended DK-20C? Does any of the regular camera stores have it or only Nikon S'pore since I couldn't find this particular model on their website?

Note : I don't wear glasses but do experience slight dispersed lights in the night (San Guang). Think its called astigmatism.

Thanks in advance.

tbc
 

madmartian

Senior Member
May 2, 2009
20,218
11
0
Outer Space
#2
Dear experts,

I would like some advice. I am new to DSLR and using a Nikon D300s. As per manual to adjust the diopter, I found that when focus is locked on and I adjusted the diopter to clockwise maximum its almost sharp (I presumed) but I have a feeling it could be sharper but I can't find out since its at the maximum. The manual suggested getting the DK-20C to further compensate. What's your expert advice?

I mostly shoot on tripod and manual focus but the shots came out not sharp even when subject is within 10 meters range. Most probably one in a hundred is sharp. Is this diopter issue the cause? Where can I purchase the recommended DK-20C? Does any of the regular camera stores have it or only Nikon S'pore since I couldn't find this particular model on their website?

Note : I don't wear glasses but do experience slight dispersed lights in the night (San Guang). Think its called astigmatism.

Thanks in advance.

tbc
The diopter does not affect focussing. If its adjusted to the max @ +, that's the furthest it can go. It depends on your eyesight & need to be adjusted accordingly.
If you shoot mostly on tripod, make sure the VR is off, that is if you are using VR lenses.
That might be the problem of the result you get in your photos. It has got nothing to do with the diopter. You can shoot blindfolded, or even if the diopter is not tune to your eyesight, provided you are using a autofocus lens.
As you mentioned, you have astig, so that may not give you 100% clear view in the viewfinder but I don't think it affect very much or even it might not affect your viewing unless your astig is real bad. ;)
 

Timolol

New Member
Sep 24, 2009
297
0
0
#3
Dear experts,

I would like some advice. I am new to DSLR and using a Nikon D300s. As per manual to adjust the diopter, I found that when focus is locked on and I adjusted the diopter to clockwise maximum its almost sharp (I presumed) but I have a feeling it could be sharper but I can't find out since its at the maximum. The manual suggested getting the DK-20C to further compensate. What's your expert advice?

I mostly shoot on tripod and manual focus but the shots came out not sharp even when subject is within 10 meters range. Most probably one in a hundred is sharp. Is this diopter issue the cause? Where can I purchase the recommended DK-20C? Does any of the regular camera stores have it or only Nikon S'pore since I couldn't find this particular model on their website?

Note : I don't wear glasses but do experience slight dispersed lights in the night (San Guang). Think its called astigmatism.

Thanks in advance.

tbc
What is your spectacle prescription?
 

tbc666

New Member
Sep 10, 2009
58
0
0
#5
The diopter does not affect focussing. If its adjusted to the max @ +, that's the furthest it can go. It depends on your eyesight & need to be adjusted accordingly.
If you shoot mostly on tripod, make sure the VR is off, that is if you are using VR lenses.
That might be the problem of the result you get in your photos. It has got nothing to do with the diopter. You can shoot blindfolded, or even if the diopter is not tune to your eyesight, provided you are using a autofocus lens.
As you mentioned, you have astig, so that may not give you 100% clear view in the viewfinder but I don't think it affect very much or even it might not affect your viewing unless your astig is real bad. ;)
Thanks madmartian for the reply, but you mentioned I can shoot blindfolded? I mean if the lens is a manual focus version without any CPU / motors inside, shouldn't the sharpness be determined by my eyesight?

tbc
 

aspenx

New Member
Aug 10, 2008
1,350
0
0
here
#6
Thanks madmartian for the reply, but you mentioned I can shoot blindfolded? I mean if the lens is a manual focus version without any CPU / motors inside, shouldn't the sharpness be determined by my eyesight?

tbc
Are you using a manual focus lens?
If you're not, I don't see the problem of shooting "blindfolded".

I have lazy eye and I hate to wear my glasses when I shoot (I don't like to wear contacts either) and I have my diopter adjusted for my master eye. But I switch to the other (bad) eye when I use the holding technique suggested by Joe McNally etc when handholding telephotos with a longer shutter speed which requires looking through the viewfinder with the left eye.

I can compose somewhat with the left eye and can also make out the focus dot although what I see through the viewfinder is blurred... I can't imagine trying to shoot with my manual focus lenses with my left eye. It is possible with the "digital rangefinder" in your camera if you are patient but it certainly won't be as fast as being able to see and focus for yourself with the correct diopter setting.
 

tbc666

New Member
Sep 10, 2009
58
0
0
#7
Are you using a manual focus lens?
If you're not, I don't see the problem of shooting "blindfolded".

I have lazy eye and I hate to wear my glasses when I shoot (I don't like to wear contacts either) and I have my diopter adjusted for my master eye. But I switch to the other (bad) eye when I use the holding technique suggested by Joe McNally etc when handholding telephotos with a longer shutter speed which requires looking through the viewfinder with the left eye.

I can compose somewhat with the left eye and can also make out the focus dot although what I see through the viewfinder is blurred... I can't imagine trying to shoot with my manual focus lenses with my left eye. It is possible with the "digital rangefinder" in your camera if you are patient but it certainly won't be as fast as being able to see and focus for yourself with the correct diopter setting.

Hi aspenx,

Actually I shoot through a telescope (digiscoping) which I think is not popular in S'pore. BTW what is the purpose of the "digital rangefinder" and how does it affect me in my case of digiscoping?

tbc
 

aspenx

New Member
Aug 10, 2008
1,350
0
0
here
#8
Hi aspenx,

Actually I shoot through a telescope (digiscoping) which I think is not popular in S'pore. BTW what is the purpose of the "digital rangefinder" and how does it affect me in my case of digiscoping?

tbc
I don't know what digiscoping is, but laser rangefinders (those used for hunting etc) can give you a good reading of how far your subject is away from you (provided you can point fairly accurately at it). The super-enthusiastic photographers shooting in the dark use the reading to help with setting the focus on their lens.
 

Timolol

New Member
Sep 24, 2009
297
0
0
#9
If the diopter adjustment is moved to the maximum +, and it feels clearer than it being at -, but still not totally clear, then you might want to check if you do have hyperopia (or presbyopia, depending on your age...)
 

madmartian

Senior Member
May 2, 2009
20,218
11
0
Outer Space
#10
Thanks madmartian for the reply, but you mentioned I can shoot blindfolded? I mean if the lens is a manual focus version without any CPU / motors inside, shouldn't the sharpness be determined by my eyesight?
tbc
Of course if you are using a manual focus lens then you have to focus with your good eye & you can't shoot blindfolded with that lens.
Like what timolol mentioned, have your eyes checked by the optician ;)
 

TroyP

New Member
Dec 23, 2008
1,822
0
0
#11
I had diopter issues when I got my camera too.
Proper diopter setting is a must when using manual focus, I was shooting macro @ 8cm away, which is a real problem when diopter is not calibrated.

Set your camera on a tripod, spot focus.
Use auto focus, and half-press to focus on the object.
Now look through the view finder and turn the diopter until you can see that same object in the same focus. Now you're set ;)

If you can't turn the diopter far enough, you'll need to get the view finder addon as suggested.
 

tbc666

New Member
Sep 10, 2009
58
0
0
#12
I had diopter issues when I got my camera too.
Proper diopter setting is a must when using manual focus, I was shooting macro @ 8cm away, which is a real problem when diopter is not calibrated.

Set your camera on a tripod, spot focus.
Use auto focus, and half-press to focus on the object.
Now look through the view finder and turn the diopter until you can see that same object in the same focus. Now you're set ;)

If you can't turn the diopter far enough, you'll need to get the view finder addon as suggested.

That's what I did as recommended in the manual. I tried calling Nikon S'pore on 03 May and they are closed. Will call them again these few days.
 

tbc666

New Member
Sep 10, 2009
58
0
0
#13
I don't know what digiscoping is, but laser rangefinders (those used for hunting etc) can give you a good reading of how far your subject is away from you (provided you can point fairly accurately at it). The super-enthusiastic photographers shooting in the dark use the reading to help with setting the focus on their lens.
aspenx,

Digiscoping is using P&S or DSLR to shoot through spotting scope or telescope. People overseas tried them very sucessfully though the bokeh is not as fantastic as standard lens due to absence of aperture ring. But the focal length can range from 1000 to 5000mm. IQ and sharpness is comparable to prime lens under ideal conditions. That's a poor man's long lens in my case.
 

aspenx

New Member
Aug 10, 2008
1,350
0
0
here
#16
Manual focus. They have a focussing knob / wheel where you turn.
There are no focus scales or anything to read the distance off from etc? Or do you have to really rely on just your eyesight (and diopters?) to focus?
 

tbc666

New Member
Sep 10, 2009
58
0
0
#17
There are no focus scales or anything to read the distance off from etc? Or do you have to really rely on just your eyesight (and diopters?) to focus?
aspenx,

Sorry to ask why do we need to tell the distance? I am new to photography! I connect the camera body to a Kenko 2X TC to an adapter and to the telescope. Look through the viewfinder, focus and shoot.

tbc
 

aspenx

New Member
Aug 10, 2008
1,350
0
0
here
#18
You may want to read up on zone focusing then.

Some of the best street photographers pre-focus their lenses to a certain distance and raise their cameras (or maybe not) to take the shot when the subject they want in focus falls into the "zone" while the photographers themselves may also be on the move.

Another need to know the distance is for the calculation of depth of field and of course calibration, I guess.
 

tbc666

New Member
Sep 10, 2009
58
0
0
#19
You may want to read up on zone focusing then.

Some of the best street photographers pre-focus their lenses to a certain distance and raise their cameras (or maybe not) to take the shot when the subject they want in focus falls into the "zone" while the photographers themselves may also be on the move.

Another need to know the distance is for the calculation of depth of field and of course calibration, I guess.

That is very chim indeed. I use this setup for birds and they can be so unpredictable as to where and when they want to land.
 

Top Bottom