Dengue Hotspots !


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Sep 20, 2004
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#2
Useful indeed, thanks for sharing.

Just another note: Aedes aegyptii, the main vector of dengue, is most active at dawn, with 5 to 9 being the most dangerous period. These days, if I need to photograph insects in the neighbourhood, I put up with the heat and do it around noon or 1pm instead, when the mosquitoes are hiding indoors!
 

raincool2005

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Sep 10, 2005
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#3
Useful indeed, thanks for sharing.

Just another note: Aedes aegyptii, the main vector of dengue, is most active at dawn, with 5 to 9 being the most dangerous period. These days, if I need to photograph insects in the neighbourhood, I put up with the heat and do it around noon or 1pm instead, when the mosquitoes are hiding indoors!
5 to 9 ? tat is when most pple are going school and going to work..
 

Sep 20, 2004
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www.vespa-bicolor.net
#4
5 to 9 ? tat is when most pple are going school and going to work..
Yup. Going to school/work cannot be helped, we can't choose to go in only in the afternoon just because of the risk of dengue. But I'd carry out other outdoor activities near residential areas (including photography) somewhat later. (Not applicable for outdoor shooting in parks some distance from residential areas; the chance of getting dengue from such areas is far lower and negligible)
 

giantcanopy

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Feb 11, 2007
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#6
PCK say , dun play play ..:cool:

( wait that was for SARS virus that he wanted to minus )

any problem just see your friendly neighbourhood doctor

Ryan
 

raincool2005

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Sep 10, 2005
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#8
geylang is hotspot. I go geylang every week......... my church is there.
u better alert the property in-charge to do fogging now... better call up the pest control before NEA comes and found something unpleasant.
:think:
 

Hawaiisg

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Oct 16, 2006
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#9
I dunno much about dengue, but i think for any disease, especially one that can kill you coming at a clip of 300-400 a week something has to be done. What I'm more curious with is that at that high a frequency rate, I wonder how many have actually died from dengue and that perhaps this might not be reported in the media.

From an outsiders point of view, if you pretty much clear out the land as in the city area, and basically leave your larger green spaces around outerlying resdential areas, i think it's a fair assumption that your outer population is now living in areas that are more dangerous. what i mean by this is that i think Singapore is too small to have cleared out some areas while leaving others in check. i mean i understand the concept of keeping as much green spaces as possible but simple diffusion will tell you that if you had an ocean that dried up into a few smaller lakes, then into a few smaller ponds, in order for the fish to live they have to migrate along with the ocean shrinkage. perhaps this is the same with the mosquitos... like the fish example, they have to migrate somewhere to survive and the smaller or less or scattered their habitat becomes, the more concentrated they will be.
 

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