cycling to take photos


t3hkor

New Member
May 18, 2009
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#1
Any of u bro/sis have experience possibly to share?

i was thinking to get a bag that is able to carry a tripod while cycling. of course the tripod cannot add on too much weight lol.

When cycling, theres definately alot of sweat on your back and bag will be slightly wet. if we leave our camera in it, will it affect the camera in anyway on long term basis? or the paddings will be sufficient to shield the camera from your sweat?

got no idea what other questions to ask at the moment...but definately the feeling of shagness and taking photo is a minus though lol.
 

kei1309

Senior Member
Apr 12, 2010
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#2
Any of u bro/sis have experience possibly to share?

i was thinking to get a bag that is able to carry a tripod while cycling. of course the tripod cannot add on too much weight lol.

When cycling, theres definately alot of sweat on your back and bag will be slightly wet. if we leave our camera in it, will it affect the camera in anyway on long term basis? or the paddings will be sufficient to shield the camera from your sweat?

got no idea what other questions to ask at the moment...but definately the feeling of shagness and taking photo is a minus though lol.
get these bags if you must keep the insides dry:

http://www.timbuk2.com/tb2/products/messenger/bike-messenger-bags/lightbright-messenger


http://www.timbuk2.com/tb2/products/sale/lightbright-swig-backpack


i'm using the sling featured on top. and i ride a motorcycle to work. it keeps my stuff dry even through a heavy rainstorm ;)
 

rhino123

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Staff member
Sep 1, 2006
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#3
Any of u bro/sis have experience possibly to share?

i was thinking to get a bag that is able to carry a tripod while cycling. of course the tripod cannot add on too much weight lol.

When cycling, theres definately alot of sweat on your back and bag will be slightly wet. if we leave our camera in it, will it affect the camera in anyway on long term basis? or the paddings will be sufficient to shield the camera from your sweat?

got no idea what other questions to ask at the moment...but definately the feeling of shagness and taking photo is a minus though lol.
Never did cycling and taking photo... but from my personal experience, your camera will not degrade in any way if you keep it in the bag while cycling, and a the padding from your bag is enough to absorb your sweat. Heck... even when you sweat on your camera it will basically not degrade its performance or whatsoever.

DSLR is not that fragile in the first place. People had used them in much more adverse environment.
 

sjackal

Senior Member
Jul 9, 2008
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#4
Install a motorcycle box on your bike ala Ah Pek style. Consider installing an umbrella too to protect from rain while riding. Problem solved! :)
 

t3hkor

New Member
May 18, 2009
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#5
Install a motorcycle box on your bike ala Ah Pek style. Consider installing an umbrella too to protect from rain while riding. Problem solved! :)
cannot lah... umbrella on fast moving object is useless :p

kei,
http://www.timbuk2.com/tb2/products/...ight-messorder the customizable one looks damn good! and yea. i only thought of sweat... what if rain? LOL GG.

the bags look damn nice. now tio new poison.
 

Sgdevilzz

Senior Member
May 16, 2010
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#7
Don't get sling/shoulder bags, I carried one while cycling around PU and it was very irritating. It keeps going to the front after
Some time an you always have to push it back.

You can consider the Lowepro Primus AW (unable to hold tripod) or the SuperTrekker Which is able to hold a tripod at the side.

Just curious, if you're taking photos while cycling, why do you need a tripod? It's gonna be very heavy with all your gear especially while going uphill. I feel that a monopod would be a better choice.
 

Edwin Francis

Senior Member
Mar 24, 2006
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#8
If you're gonna use it a fair bit and ride for longer distances, a proper rack and pannier setup is an good option.


Ortlieb Front Roller Classic Panniers by EdFrancis, on Flickr

Rain? The Ortliebs in the photo can take a torrential downpour and keep your stuff dry. They weren't cheap at over $200, but then your gear is probably worth a lot more.
I placed in insert from one of my cam bags inside for some padding and for the compartments.

I did some experimentation when starting to bike commute to work on a foldie 3 years ago, with a backpack, then the backpack strapped to the rack with bungee cords, then bit the bullet and bought the panniers (I rode to work with a 12" notebook, DSLR and other assorted bits).

Sling bags are okay for light stuff e.g. a notepad and a compact, but they do swing to the side and front at inconvenient moments, which is more of a problem with heavier loads. Some favour backpacks, but they leave me with a sweaty back and sore shoulders (depending on load and distance of course). I've comfortably carried ard 16kg in my rear panniers on a foldie. You only really feel the weight when you lift the bike, or go up a steep slope.

There are other options such as handlebar bags. Check out the bike forums (e.g http://www.togoparts.com), and google for panniers, handlebar bags etc. Ortlieb's site - http://www.ortlieb.de/index_black.php. There's a shop at Alexandra Road, opp Alexandra Hospital that deals with Ortliebs -- Fall Factor (http://www.fallfactor.com). There are other good brands of course, but I haven't tried the others.
 

aspenx

New Member
Aug 10, 2008
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#9
The simplest way is to put whatever bag you're using for your camera, into the basket if the bicycle comes with one. At least, that's what I do when I rent bikes in Japan. If I were traveling with my DSLR, I'll have it outside with a lens mounted and carry it with my Rapidfire strap (while cycling). When it's just my compact, I'd just hang it on my wrist. Of course, this doesn't apply for mountainbiking etc.

If you're riding cross country and what not, and require a hydration pack too, I'd recommend a Osprey backpack. I have the Atmos 25 and really like it. It has great support, keeps your back cool and fits EVERYTHING you need in without being a burden. Not recommended for downhilling though as the bag is apt to hit your head for steeper slopes.

For a touring bike, definitely the panniers.
 

t3hkor

New Member
May 18, 2009
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#11
I'm currently using the Lowepro Photo Sport 200 AW.

http://www.lowepro.com/photosport

Fits my E-PL1 and a couple of lens, water bag and gorrillapod on the side. Plus still have space for other times if required.
yea this one looks good also!

thanks for the replies guys!
btw have u guys cycled with a tripod before? lol
 

catchlights

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Sep 27, 2004
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#12

pinholecam

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Jul 23, 2007
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#13
I do this now and then.
In fact I've done this on a couple of overseas trips.
There is no need for any fancy gadgets and gizmos.
There isn't even a need for a fancy bike, cause it will just attract attention and get stolen the moment you leave it to take photos.
Just a decent bike that can be cycled for some distance will do (but those $80 ones sure CMI :D ; been there done that )

Carrying the camera can be done by just placing it in a haversack bag, and hanging it on the handle bars in the front.
If the bike has a front basket, you can use that too.
If not, or if you dislike the front heavy handling and drag when at speed or when the headwind blows (of both), then just get a rear panier.
For me, I just use a cheapo Urata foldable with a unwanted spare Shimano 105 crank with a rear panier.
The bag is secured the old way with a bicycle elastic band and hook.
I will run the bag strap round the seat post just in case the hooks give way somehow, so the bag does not drop to the ground.
Tripod is either hanged on the handlebar or secured behind on the panier.
 

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t3hkor

New Member
May 18, 2009
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#14
thanks for the pic catchlights! looks like a damn good way to mount my tripod! gota figure out after i settle down everything!

pinehole, actually yea i got a bicycle and i damn vain lol so my bicycle got no basket n stuffs lol... but i wana ride and take pics like a cycling journalism kind. maybe i should check out with the shops also!
 

canonmono

Senior Member
Nov 22, 2010
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#15
Im using a brompton and a leather bag specially design for puting camera mount in place of the basket the mounting + bag (18L, can put flash my 70-300mmL, diffsuerand a camera with 17-50mm mounted)and padding is ard 400+ and bike is 3K O.O
 

boonzzzz

New Member
Sep 2, 2011
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#16
i am a newbie to photography but i have always enjoy cycle touring. my 2cts:

1) it depends on how far you want to travel. if you are just cycling within singapore, a backpack may be ok but i would hate to have any serious weight on my back for any trip >1day or >150km. for longer distances, besides sweat, you will be juggling between numb hands and butt ache and having a ton of gear on your back wont help at all ... if you are cycling >3-4hrs/day during your trip, it pays to invest to get the weight off your back to make cycling more enjoyable.

2) how much gear/weight? anything thing more than 5kg i want it off my back. below 10kg, i may try to distribute weight between a medium to large size saddlebag and handlebar bag (checkout carradice for some style). anything more than 10kg i will want to get a rear rack + trunk bag or panniers. anything more than 20kg i will get a front rack to distribute the load more evenly. loading the front will affect bike handling so the sequence is usually load rear before load front and always try to load low (C.G) for heavier stuff. i will never consider putting stuff in a bicycle front basket unless i am only cycling a few blocks to get a 6-pack. it also looked very auntie... as for tripod, it should work by putting on top of a rear rack.

3) what kind of bike? if your road/hybrid/mountain bike comes with braze-ons/screw-boss, you will have many options for racks and panniers. if yours is a pure road racing machine, racks/panniers may not be an option. you may have to consider those bigger saddlebags and complement with handlebar bags, frame bags etc. seatpost mounted racks are also an option but i will prefer the saddlebag route. advantage of the non-rack options is that you can easily take them off when you are not loading.
h t t p : //joecruz.wordpress.com/category/gear/

hope this helps
 

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