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Crossing Processing


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ptyap

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Apr 10, 2007
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#1
AFAIK, there are two types of cross processing: color negative film in slide chemicals ("C-41 as E-6") or slide film by the color negative process ("E-6 as C-41"). In photoshop, how do we get these two visual effects digitally? How are they different? Thanks! :)
 

lsisaxon

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Nov 29, 2004
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#3
AFAIK, there are two types of cross processing: color negative film in slide chemicals ("C-41 as E-6") or slide film by the color negative process ("E-6 as C-41"). In photoshop, how do we get these two visual effects digitally? How are they different? Thanks! :)
Basically if you cross-process slide film in C-41, what you would get is a negative image without the brown tint. The tonal curve would also be quite different. If you cross-process negative film with E6, then you're going to get a positive image due to the reversal process but with the brown tinge. Usually, most would cross process slide film with C-41 rather than the other way round, so in Photoshop you can just try inverting the colours and then tweaking the colour balance and the gamma to get a similar effect.
 

calebk

Senior Member
Jul 25, 2006
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Clementi
#4
Check this website out. This website offers Photoshop actions for download, and I think the one that might interest you is called 'Editorial Lomo'.
 

ptyap

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Apr 10, 2007
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#5
Basically if you cross-process slide film in C-41, what you would get is a negative image without the brown tint. The tonal curve would also be quite different. If you cross-process negative film with E6, then you're going to get a positive image due to the reversal process but with the brown tinge. Usually, most would cross process slide film with C-41 rather than the other way round, so in Photoshop you can just try inverting the colours and then tweaking the colour balance and the gamma to get a similar effect.
Thanks for the explanation. :)
 

Jul 30, 2006
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#7
If you have photoshop cs3, go to the curve adjustment and select cross processing option.
 

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