[Crop1.6]50mm ok for portraits?


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Ah Keong

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Dec 3, 2014
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#1
Hi,

I would like to ask is 50mm lens ok for wedding portraits shoot on a crop sensor?
50mm x 1.6 = 80mm.

Read that [FF]85mm, [FF]100mm, [FF]135mm lens would be good for portraits.

Thank you.

:lovegrin:
 

rhino123

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#2
Hi,

I would like to ask is 50mm lens ok for wedding portraits shoot on a crop sensor?
50mm x 1.6 = 80mm.

Read that [FF]85mm, [FF]100mm, [FF]135mm lens would be good for portraits.

Thank you.

:lovegrin:
depend on your composition (half body, full body, headshot, etc), the size of the venue you are shooting the portrait on (how far you can step back, move forward, etc), etc. any lens of any focal length can be used.
 

SkyStrike

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#3
As mentioned by Rhino, any lens can do portraits. The only difference will be the working distance.

The "standard" portraits focal length in the past is 35, 85, 135. But that doesn't mean that other focal length are bad. Just a matter of different application.

But with that being said, take into consideration the distortion that different focal length gives. E.g. shooting 24mm for a headshot might give you a big nose.

**on a side note, you're going to shoot wedding ???
 

Nikonzen

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#4
IMO It's possible to make a decent half body portrait with a 50 on the crop you mentioned and any other similar crop. I have an 85 but I prefer the 100 and using my legs to go for the head and shoulders. I feel that full body made with 135 or 180 and the subject is a good distance from photographer are good focal lengths to represent the subject in it's environment. The longer length flattens the environment and background which can sometimes really make the subject pop. All of this DX of course. (Must say I am about the same with full frame too)
 

Ah Keong

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#5
depend on your composition (half body, full body, headshot, etc), the size of the venue you are shooting the portrait on (how far you can step back, move forward, etc), etc. any lens of any focal length can be used.
Thanks rhino123!

the composition would be around half body to headshot, the venue would be a ballroom. I was told that the space would be limited for stepping back and was recommended to use a short telephoto (85mm or 100mm).
 

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Ah Keong

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Dec 3, 2014
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#6
As mentioned by Rhino, any lens can do portraits. The only difference will be the working distance.

The "standard" portraits focal length in the past is 35, 85, 135. But that doesn't mean that other focal length are bad. Just a matter of different application.

But with that being said, take into consideration the distortion that different focal length gives. E.g. shooting 24mm for a headshot might give you a big nose.

**on a side note, you're going to shoot wedding ???
Thanks SkyStrike!

I was shown the floor plan with the tables layout and was told the space may not be sufficient step back.
Read that 50mm is still ok on the distortion aspect.

**on a side note, I would be the third photographer (noob) to assist the other two photographers (pro) to shoot wedding.
**Read that Wedding shooting is more chim than Street shooting. Stress....
 

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Ah Keong

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Dec 3, 2014
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#7
IMO It's possible to make a decent half body portrait with a 50 on the crop you mentioned and any other similar crop. I have an 85 but I prefer the 100 and using my legs to go for the head and shoulders. I feel that full body made with 135 or 180 and the subject is a good distance from photographer are good focal lengths to represent the subject in it's environment. The longer length flattens the environment and background which can sometimes really make the subject pop. All of this DX of course. (Must say I am about the same with full frame too)
Thanks Nikonzen!

was thinking whether to buy a F1.8-50mm lens, or borrow a 85mm lens from my friend. 100mm maybe out of range for my crop camera body as I am task to capture snapshots of head and shoulders.
I am also afraid of spoiling my friend's 100mm lens and was also told that his lens focusing is slow compared to 85mm.
 

SkyStrike

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#8
Thanks SkyStrike!

I was shown the floor plan with the tables layout and was told the space may not be sufficient step back.
Read that 50mm is still ok on the distortion aspect.

**on a side note, I would be the third photographer (noob) to assist the other two photographers (pro) to shoot wedding.
**Read that Wedding shooting is more chim than Street shooting. Stress....
wow... with 2 person shooting on the ground, I'm not even sure where you will get your shot without interference at 50mm range (I would probably use a bazooka and stay far far away out of sight).

Not sure about 85mm, but I kinda feel that 100mm L does focus quite slowly... (esp when it goes from macro to infinity)
 

rhino123

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#9
Frankly, I will use a 70-200mm f2.8 if I were you. I can stand back quite comfortably or focus closer in to get my shot. Yes... it's aperture is only f2.8 and so you might want to get an external flash to help you with. But not sure if that setup will cause any problem with the pro-photographers.
 

pinholecam

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#10
Thanks SkyStrike!

I was shown the floor plan with the tables layout and was told the space may not be sufficient step back.
Read that 50mm is still ok on the distortion aspect.

**on a side note, I would be the third photographer (noob) to assist the other two photographers (pro) to shoot wedding.
**Read that Wedding shooting is more chim than Street shooting. Stress....

I would suggest going for 35mm (about 56mm on the Canon).
50mm would have working distance problems indoors in a wedding.

The safest bet is a workhorse zoom like a 28-75/2.8, 17-50/2.8 or 24-70/2.8
 

daredevil123

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Oct 25, 2005
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#11
Thanks SkyStrike!

I was shown the floor plan with the tables layout and was told the space may not be sufficient step back.
Read that 50mm is still ok on the distortion aspect.

**on a side note, I would be the third photographer (noob) to assist the other two photographers (pro) to shoot wedding.
**Read that Wedding shooting is more chim than Street shooting. Stress....
As a 3rd photographer you should be using a longer lens and capture some moments while not in the way.
 

Nikonzen

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#12
Here is a sample of 105 on DX Fujifilm Crop. I was just a guest with a camera here so I stayed out of the way.

 

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undergrd

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Jun 16, 2007
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#13
Agree with some of the bros here. As a 3rd photographer, i think one of your considerations is not to interfere with the main 2. Best is a long lens and snipe from far since you are probably more of a candid shooter.
 

Kermitfm

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Mar 10, 2007
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#14
To directly answer your question, 50mm is definitely alright for the half body portraits using a crop sensor camera. The fast aperture f1.8 or faster is also good to provide background separation and shooting in low light condition.

As advised by some posters here, as a 3rd shooter, you should not interfere with the primary photographers. Try to focus on the periphery of the event, to cover those shots that the main photographers are not shooting. eg. when the bride and groom are walking in to the dining room, focus on the parents and their proud faces. This way, the couple will have better view of the the whole event when they look through the photos. If you are quick in changing lenses, then have a zoom handy so that you can compose without moving.

Most important point: ask the person who engaged you (the main photographers or the couple), what are their expectation (backup to the 2 photographers or complement with environmental shots or ….)

Cheers
 

undergrd

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Jun 16, 2007
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#15
Most important point: ask the person who engaged you (the main photographers or the couple), what are their expectation (backup to the 2 photographers or complement with environmental shots or ….)
This is a damn important point. Totally agree. Know the expectations so that you don't shoot blindly and mismatch with the expectations at the end of the day.
 

Ah Keong

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Dec 3, 2014
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#16
wow... with 2 person shooting on the ground, I'm not even sure where you will get your shot without interference at 50mm range (I would probably use a bazooka and stay far far away out of sight).

Not sure about 85mm, but I kinda feel that 100mm L does focus quite slowly... (esp when it goes from macro to infinity)
Thanks SkyStrike,

In this case, I may borrow 85mm then.
 

Ah Keong

Senior Member
Dec 3, 2014
571
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#17
Frankly, I will use a 70-200mm f2.8 if I were you. I can stand back quite comfortably or focus closer in to get my shot. Yes... it's aperture is only f2.8 and so you might want to get an external flash to help you with. But not sure if that setup will cause any problem with the pro-photographers.
Thanks rhino123!
I am still noob with the flash so I may not be using else may spoil the pro's shots.
 

SkyStrike

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#18
Thanks SkyStrike,

In this case, I may borrow 85mm then.
Thanks rhino123!
I am still noob with the flash so I may not be using else may spoil the pro's shots.
I think it's starting to go abit off topic liao... The "casual" wedding dinner shooter topic kinda draws alot of heated debates.

If you have an option of shooting with a lens 70-200 f2.8, I'll suggest using that over the 85mm. One reason why I'll suggest such long lens is as mentioned by others is to not obstruct/limit the 1st and 2nd shooter's movement and angles. Some of them tends to run all over the place. *Probably one of the last thing you will want to do is to shoot right behind them*

And, if you are not the main photog team, I won't recommend firing flash at all. Since it may potentially cause the "banding" issue for some critical shots.


For your original question: Just found the link to the portrait and focal length post... http://stepheneastwood.com/tutorials/lensdistortion/strippage.htm
I think the images are self-explanatory.

Here's a thumbnail view of those images I grabbed off Google images
 

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Ah Keong

Senior Member
Dec 3, 2014
571
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#19
I would suggest going for 35mm (about 56mm on the Canon).
50mm would have working distance problems indoors in a wedding.

The safest bet is a workhorse zoom like a 28-75/2.8, 17-50/2.8 or 24-70/2.8
Thanks pinholecam!

I shall consider the 35mm also.
 

Ah Keong

Senior Member
Dec 3, 2014
571
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#20
As a 3rd photographer you should be using a longer lens and capture some moments while not in the way.
Thanks daredevil123!
I shall consider 85mm or 100mm so as not to obstruct the first two photographers.
 

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