cpl filter


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alvinkm

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Dec 4, 2008
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wads the different between expensive and cheap ones?
 

ChongK

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Nov 15, 2007
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#7
I can tell you the main difference between cheap and expensive CPL filters.

Firstly,a cheap filter will reduce your f/stops by 2.5-4 stops..

For an expensive(pro) filters, it reduces your f/stops by only 1.

Thats one of the main reason between the pricing of filters. And of course,not to forget the brand, like Hoya,B+W, it is sure bound to be more expensive. But i have a Kenko (pro),if you actually do some research, Hoya,Kenko and some other brand are actually from the same manufacturer. So its up to you which to choose, this is just my 2 cents worth of thoughts :D


Cheers!
 

Apr 15, 2008
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#8
I can tell you the main difference between cheap and expensive CPL filters.

Firstly,a cheap filter will reduce your f/stops by 2.5-4 stops..

For an expensive(pro) filters, it reduces your f/stops by only 1.
wow :bigeyes:

2.5-4 stops...guess those are only useful for shots taken with tripods. (the plus though, is that they can serve as low-powered ND filters as well :p)
 

Kit

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Jan 19, 2002
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#9
Truthfully, I haven't come across a polariser that let you loose up to 4 stops. Not even a $15linear polariser. But its true the more expensive ones are more efficient. Nikon ones only loose about 1/3 to 1/2 stop.
 

ChongK

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Nov 15, 2007
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#11
Ehh sorry, i was going to type 3stops instead of 4 ;p Sorry my bad :embrass:

Yah, 3 stops is really going to make you lose quite abit of light..unless you can afford long exposures.

CPL is somewhat similar to ND i guess in certain ways? ( Don't slam me if i'm worng) hahah!
But yeah,CPL helps you get richer colours in your pictures..Its good investing in a "pro" CPL filter,you will find it useful somehow. :)
 

Octarine

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Jan 3, 2008
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#12
Curious... so a "cheap" CPL can be a plus point in a sunny day... to act as a ND filter too right?
That depends on your intention and usage. Under certain conditions where you cannot close the aperture any further (diffraction) and you have already lowest possible ISO it can help to extend the exposure time. But keep in mind that those cheap filters also have their drawbacks (flare). Also, check that you don't get polarizing effects that you might not want. A ND filter is neutral.
 

Anson

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Jul 31, 2006
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#13
That depends on your intention and usage. Under certain conditions where you cannot close the aperture any further (diffraction) and you have already lowest possible ISO it can help to extend the exposure time. But keep in mind that those cheap filters also have their drawbacks (flare). Also, check that you don't get polarizing effects that you might not want. A ND filter is neutral.
I understand... mainly CPL filter are used in daylight shots... which we can use the shutter speed & aperture to control the overall lighting of the photo... I have not yet to have a issue with flaring on a budget hoya CPL filter yet (maybe because I used it together with a lens hood)... :think:
 

couleur

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Nov 12, 2006
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#14
I think ts the material, cheap and expensive sure has a difference,

I just bought myself a 77MM B+W KSM MRC, this is like one of the most expensive ones you can get in the market. But i haven't tried it though. It comes with a filter cap too. Pretty impressive.
 

Anson

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Jul 31, 2006
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#15
I think ts the material, cheap and expensive sure has a difference,

I just bought myself a 77MM B+W KSM MRC, this is like one of the most expensive ones you can get in the market. But i haven't tried it though. It comes with a filter cap too. Pretty impressive.
Curious... normally the filter should fit into the original lens cap, why would you need an extra filter cap? :dunno:
 

#16
Curious... normally the filter should fit into the original lens cap, why would you need an extra filter cap? :dunno:
If it is the SLIM type of B+W filter, there are no front threads, hence the need for the filter cap.

The only exception is the latest XS-Pro B+W filter with front threads. This is the only SLIM B+W filter which can accommodate the lens cap.
 

agape01

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Feb 13, 2003
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#18
I think ts the material, cheap and expensive sure has a difference,

I just bought myself a 77MM B+W KSM MRC, this is like one of the most expensive ones you can get in the market. But i haven't tried it though. It comes with a filter cap too. Pretty impressive.
Hey, how much was it and you got it from CP?
 

mrericlee

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Sep 27, 2008
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#20
Thanks for the info... I also heard that these filter are harder to remove and often get "stuck" on the lens... is it true? :dunno:
I have a B+W 77mm MRC. Never had the stuck in lens issue. Unless... you try to screw it in SUPER tight, I don't see why installing and removing will be any different from a UV filter.
 

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