converting your DSLR into monochrome... by scratching off the colour filter...


qystan

New Member
Jul 8, 2010
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#3
really gutsy... but, i can't imagine anyone intentionally scratching off the colour filter to convert the camera to BnW....

:eek:
If you did read the post, it is clearly stated.
 

qystan

New Member
Jul 8, 2010
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#9
With the same amount of $ you can scratch 5 D7100s of its color sensor and still retain one with color sensor in tact. :bsmilie:
Scratch n win prize.
 

ed9119

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Mar 11, 2002
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#10
the tones look flat ... thats a crude hacksaw method of converting into a bw camera

there are other methods of conversion to BW with various verisons of BW available out there for only a couple of hundred bucks

my personal view is to leave the camera alone and use screw-on color filters and/or PS
 

Last edited:

ArchRival

New Member
Sep 17, 2006
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#11
Anybody knows any service to do this locally?
Reason is i hope to do narrowband imaging in hydrogen-alpha, i'd prefer a proper b/w sensor.
 

JasonB

Deregistered
Jun 2, 2009
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#12
Dumb to me, ingenious to some.
 

qystan

New Member
Jul 8, 2010
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#13
Taking the filter off removes a layer of light loss. Effectively its like getting a more sensitive sensor without more noise that normally accompanies.

Stars are pretty much just white dots unless you're talking major telescopes.

A BW camera is not likely to equal this hack. PS can't do anything if the data isn't there.
 

fatigue

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Sep 26, 2005
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#14
I've got some scrap sensors and tried to remove the Bayer filter.
Here's what I discovered:
- Removing the sensor glass cover is a bit tricky. It can break easily. Best is to apply solvent on the glue that holds the glass cover before prying open
- Scratching the Bayer filter with wood will leave some fine scratches. For better results, use lens tissue dipped in solvent

 

nightwolf75

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Staff member
Dec 18, 2003
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really MORE diaper changes
#15
I've got some scrap sensors and tried to remove the Bayer filter.
Here's what I discovered:
- Removing the sensor glass cover is a bit tricky. It can break easily. Best is to apply solvent on the glue that holds the glass cover before prying open
- Scratching the Bayer filter with wood will leave some fine scratches. For better results, use lens tissue dipped in solvent

haha... i was about to message you to ask about your progress! i guess it is a no-go? i was following up on the thread over at petapixel. it seems those astro-photographers are using some industrial solvents (which i don't even want to pretend i understand...got lost when they started throwing multi-syllable chemical names... ) to remove the coating.
 

fatigue

Senior Member
Sep 26, 2005
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#16
Tried my luck on another scrap sensor. This time I used a strong thread and solvent to carefully remove the glass cover.



Success! managed to remove the cover in one piece.
But removing the Bayer filter needs a delicate and long process so I decided not to proceed. :(
 

Jan 30, 2012
326
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New Zealand
#17
How would you "process" the resulting RAW? If I open the "mono" image in Sony Data Convertor, it surely applies the demosaicing process, when in reality it isn't needed.
Anyone familiar with opening a RAW image with something like DCRAW, so I can see if the Sony software is any different? RAW files are indeed mono, but I want to see if they are better with other software.
Gary
 

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