Controlling Flash in strong backlit situation


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Aug 9, 2006
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#1
How do one control or uses their flash on their dark subject in strong backlit situation? You do not want to overexpose the already-bright background but neither you want to underexpose your already-dark subject.

What should be the correct approach? Please share.
 

eikin

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#2
canongrapherL said:
How do one control or uses their flash on their dark subject in strong backlit situation? You do not want to overexpose the already-bright background but neither you want to underexpose your already-dark subject.

What should be the correct approach? Please share.
what do you mean by control/use the flash? your question is very vague for me ...
 

Del_CtrlnoAlt

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#3
canongrapherL said:
How do one control or uses their flash on their dark subject in strong backlit situation? You do not want to overexpose the already-bright background but neither you want to underexpose your already-dark subject.

What should be the correct approach? Please share.
use HSS, then point your flash head directly at subject, spot meter on the subject, and shoot.

but den if i was the one shooting, there its another story altogether, mine need to chut pattern 1... hahah... cos i need trial & error, i dun like direct light. find out your own style...
 

ipin

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#4
canongrapherL said:
How do one control or uses their flash on their dark subject in strong backlit situation? You do not want to overexpose the already-bright background but neither you want to underexpose your already-dark subject.

What should be the correct approach? Please share.
take 2 shots in RAW and then use HDR in CS2 to get correct exposures for both foreground and background
 

Aug 9, 2006
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#5
Pardon me, what is HDR?

Any techniques to take photos without having to photoshop?
 

AReality

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#6
Set your flash to Manual, and maximum output.
Set to Tv mode, at your cam's fastest sync speed, usually 1/250s.
-1 EV on your cam.
ISO does not really matter as long as your aperture is able to handle the situation. i.e.: not at your highest F-number. if it is, dial down ISO.

Aim and make sure is focused at your subject.
Fire away.
Preview, adjust flash output as necessary.
 

Apr 10, 2006
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#7
i just shot an event today & every shot was against the sun. my style is high shutter/small aperture. bokeh isn't stunning but its still there...with no overexposure.
 

Aug 9, 2006
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#8
wont 1/250 overexpose the background if it is really strong sunlight?



AReality said:
Set your flash to Manual, and maximum output.
Set to Tv mode, at your cam's fastest sync speed, usually 1/250s.
-1 EV on your cam.
ISO does not really matter as long as your aperture is able to handle the situation. i.e.: not at your highest F-number. if it is, dial down ISO.

Aim and make sure is focused at your subject.
Fire away.
Preview, adjust flash output as necessary.
 

Aug 9, 2006
267
0
0
#9
wont 1/250 overexpose the background if it is really strong sunlight?



AReality said:
Set your flash to Manual, and maximum output.
Set to Tv mode, at your cam's fastest sync speed, usually 1/250s.
-1 EV on your cam.
ISO does not really matter as long as your aperture is able to handle the situation. i.e.: not at your highest F-number. if it is, dial down ISO.

Aim and make sure is focused at your subject.
Fire away.
Preview, adjust flash output as necessary.
 

CYRN

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Nov 14, 2002
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#10
canongrapherL said:
wont 1/250 overexpose the background if it is really strong sunlight?
there's no way your itsybitsy flash can be more powerful than the sun.

There's always the option of reflector + strobe combi if you really want. :sweat:
 

Sep 14, 2004
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#11
there's this guy on the internet who has a website that talks about the use of flash extensively with a number of great real-life experience stories. he is a portrait photographer (often doing location work) and he has a few techniques that helped me tremendously. take a look at his website at http://www.dg28.com/technique.html. i think you'll find your answers there.
 

westwest1

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Feb 25, 2006
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#12
My example of strong backlight



Setting

Focal Length: 70mm
Exposure Mode: Aperture Priority
Metering Mode: Multi-Pattern
1/180 sec - F/2.8
Exposure Comp.: 0 EV
Sensitivity: ISO 100
Optimize Image: Normal
White Balance: Auto
AF Mode: AF-S
Flash Sync Mode: Front Curtain
Auto Flash Mode: Built-in TTL
Auto Flash Comp: -3.0 EV
Second Flash: -0.7 EV
Color Mode: Mode I (sRGB)
Tone Comp.: Auto
Hue Adjustment: 0°
Saturation: Auto
Sharpening: Auto
Image Comment: copyright(C)glenn
Long Exposure NR: Off
High ISO NR: Off
 

judeseah

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Jan 20, 2005
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#13
assuming u r a canon user, setting P n centre weighted metering,-

aim at the bright spot,
press FEL, focus n recompose,
shoot.
that's it,
use a lower iso too would help unless its night scene.

jude
 

Aug 9, 2006
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#14
CYRN said:
there's no way your itsybitsy flash can be more powerful than the sun.

There's always the option of reflector + strobe combi if you really want. :sweat:
haha. You got me wrong.

Let describe the situation again. When you meter at the strong background of the sky, the meter says "1/2000" but when you meter your subject in front of the sky, it says "1/250". THEREfore, if I shoot at the shutter speed of "1/250" this shutter speed will be too long for the background and thus overexpose the strongly lit sky (Though the subject is correctly exposed). BUT if I shoot at "1/2000", my backlit subject will be underexposed so some flash is necessary (But TTL will be fooled by the sun so need manual flash control)

So there should be a methodological approach to caculate the the right shutter speed and flash manipulation in order to correctly expose both background and foreground subjects. I am surprised nobody seems to be able to describe the approach yet.
 

CYRN

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#15
canongrapherL said:
haha. You got me wrong.

Let describe the situation again. When you meter at the strong background of the sky, the meter says "1/2000" but when you meter your subject in front of the sky, it says "1/250". THEREfore, if I shoot at the shutter speed of "1/250" this shutter speed will be too long for the background and thus overexpose the strongly lit sky (Though the subject is correctly exposed). BUT if I shoot at "1/2000", my backlit subject will be underexposed so some flash is necessary (But TTL will be fooled by the sun so need manual flash control)

So there should be a methodological approach to caculate the the right shutter speed and flash manipulation in order to correctly expose both background and foreground subjects. I am surprised nobody seems to be able to describe the approach yet.
oic... normally ppl use ND filters loh.

Else use the FP thingy, common in flashes nowadays, and shoot @ 1/2000. Cuz if you dun use the FP thingy, you'd be stuck @ 1/200 or 1/250 anyway.

For calculation between subject and BG... depends on the contrast between them loh...if beyond sensor's DR no matter how also cannot loh.
 

willyfoo

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Jan 18, 2002
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#16
CYRN said:
there's no way your itsybitsy flash can be more powerful than the sun.

There's always the option of reflector + strobe combi if you really want. :sweat:
It depends... the other way to have a stronger flash is to move closer to the subject... you might have to use a wider lens though..
 

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