Confusing ques: Canon D30 + Adobe PS


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psyche

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#1
Hi,

The Canon 10D utilizes Adobe RGB as its colour gamut, while the D30 uses only sRGB (something I only know recently!) But I have some questions which I don't understand.

When I open an image file taken with the D30 on Photoshop, it will ask me 3 ques, 2 of which if I want to assign it as Adobe RGB or leave it as it is. If the image is in sRGB, what's the point of assigning it as RGB since some colours will be clipped due to the different colour gamuts?

2nd ques: Does that mean the D30 is more limited compared to 10D when it comes to printing the images (RGB) since sRGB is more suitable for screen display?

Sorry if the questions sounds basic... I'm barely grasping the concepts of colour managemnt....

Thanks!!!
 

munfai

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The 10D can capture in both sRGB and Adobe RGB.

if your image was taken using the sRGB colour space, when you open it using PS, you assign the sRGB colour space to it, then convert it to Adobe RGB.

converting sRGB to Adobe RGB will not cause clipping as Adobe RGB has a wider gamut.

the advantage with using Adobe RGB is you have a wider colour space to play with. anyway, you're not going to send your images straight from the D30 to the printer. you are after all going to tweak the image in PS, right?

colour management in digital workflow is not dependant on the camera. so images from the D30 is no way inferior to the 10D when it comes to printing.
 

Watcher

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#3
Originally posted by munfai
colour management in digital workflow is not dependant on the camera. so images from the D30 is no way inferior to the 10D when it comes to printing.
To a certain extent, it does. In fact the above statement is wrong. It does matter. Why? Imagine I have a colour that is outside the sRGB gamut, but is inside AdobeRGB. When I use the D30, I cannot capture the exact color, but with the 10D I can. Without the colour in the original, can you say that is equal?
 

munfai

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Originally posted by Watcher
To a certain extent, it does. In fact the above statement is wrong. It does matter. Why? Imagine I have a colour that is outside the sRGB gamut, but is inside AdobeRGB. When I use the D30, I cannot capture the exact color, but with the 10D I can. Without the colour in the original, can you say that is equal?
point taken. i stand corrected.
 

May 24, 2003
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I believe it probably does not matter whether you are using sRGB or Adobe RGB if you intend to print the photos as the printer's gamut is less than either.

However, having a wider gamut will probably help if you are tweaking the colours in PS.
 

Watcher

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Originally posted by linse
I believe it probably does not matter whether you are using sRGB or Adobe RGB if you intend to print the photos as the printer's gamut is less than either.

However, having a wider gamut will probably help if you are tweaking the colours in PS.
Wrong again. It depends on your device that you will be printing to. For examle, the Epson 2100/2200 has a substantially larger gamut than sRGB (view it inside the book that Noir and I mentioned here). Even a sub-dye printer has a significantly larger (in fact a very large) gamut.

sRGB is actually a rather small gamut as it is the "lower common denominator" that is commonly used by digital devices.
 

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Originally posted by Watcher
Wrong again. It depends on your device that you will be printing to. For examle, the Epson 2100/2200 has a substantially larger gamut than sRGB (view it inside the book that Noir and I mentioned here). Even a sub-dye printer has a significantly larger (in fact a very large) gamut.

sRGB is actually a rather small gamut as it is the "lower common denominator" that is commonly used by digital devices.
You're probably right about the more expensive printers. I do not have any experience with the Epson 2100/2200 professional printers or dye-sub printers. I hear Canon's S950 is pretty good too but.

My experience with Fuji Frontiers commercial printers is that the prints have much narrower gamut than sRGB.

 

Watcher

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#8
Originally posted by linse
You're probably right about the more expensive printers. I do not have any experience with the Epson 2100/2200 professional printers or dye-sub printers. I hear Canon's S950 is pretty good too but.

My experience with Fuji Frontiers commercial printers is that the prints have much narrower gamut than sRGB.
Yep, the Frontiers have a much smaller gamut. That is why unless I die die must do lots of prints, I don't bother to use the Frontier to print. For top shots, I would rather spend $$$ to print on the Epson as it will do justice to the image. It is kinda of a letdown if you spend so much money on the capturing device, effort in capturing the picture but let down by the output device...
 

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