Cokin Filters


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Evilmerlin

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Jul 26, 2002
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I'm looking to try out the Cokin Filters on my 14-45mm and potentially 11-22mm lens. Was wondering if anybody has tried them out and experienced any vignetting or otherwise undesirable effects?

Which one should I get the A or P holder? Quite confusing this system.

Mainly going to get the Grad ND Filters.
 

Fire Kirin

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I would advise the P-series.:D
 

OlyFlyer

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Mar 22, 2006
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I'm looking to try out the Cokin Filters on my 14-45mm and potentially 11-22mm lens. Was wondering if anybody has tried them out and experienced any vignetting or otherwise undesirable effects?
Why Cokin? I find them just too clumsy to handle, very effective dust collectors and also very sensitive to scratches. By accident, I got several different ones and after examining those, I must say I was not interested in trying them. Just didn't see any point in doing that. Sold all, the one I can not sell is a Blue A 020. Nobody seems to be interested in that one.
 

ryuggen

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Apr 5, 2006
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Why Cokin? I find them just too clumsy to handle, very effective dust collectors and also very sensitive to scratches. By accident, I got several different ones and after examining those, I must say I was not interested in trying them. Just didn't see any point in doing that. Sold all, the one I can not sell is a Blue A 020. Nobody seems to be interested in that one.
For landscape photography, isnt that the cokin p system the best choice? Thats the way we can alter the placement of the GND.
 

OlyFlyer

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Mar 22, 2006
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For landscape photography, isnt that the cokin p system the best choice? Thats the way we can alter the placement of the GND.
Don't ask me, I have no Cokin knowledge. Don't even know what the difference is between P and A type.
 

Evilmerlin

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The primary reason I'm looking to get the Cokin Filters is for their Graduated ND Filters. It allows great flexibility in where you place the graduation. Something you can't do with the screw on GND.

Cumbersome to use no doubt but I think its worth it for the flexibility.
 

nuxnewbie

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Nov 2, 2006
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My guess is that you'll most likely to be shooting with the assistance of a tripod whilst using GND filters.

If so, handling / positioning the filters is a piece of cake since you've got both hands free to do it.

The filters are plastic and rather prone to scratches.

Nevertheless, the scratches/dust will hardly, if ever, show up on your photos due to the filter being positioned within your lens' closest focusing distance and the fact that you'll stop the lens down most of the time. Just replace the filters if they get too banged up. Only @ S$20-30 a piece.

Most manufacturers have filters in either 'P' size (84mm width) or 'Z' size (100mm width), so it will be advisable to buy the filter holder in such sizes. Use 'Z' size if using really wide angle lenses (< 20mm, 35mm equivalent). Bigger filters cost more obviously. Get only the biggest size that you need, save the money to buy more filters.

Some tips, which you may already know: -

1) Meter with the dark portion of the filter covering your lens. The rating of the ND may not be accurate. A ND rated at 3-stops may be only be worth 2-1/2 stops. TTL metering eliminates this problem.

2) Effect more pronounced when lens is stopped down. that's why you're most likely to be using a tripod. and that's why the filters should be quite easy to handle.

3) Graduation effect / line can be quite hard to see. If lens aperture is electronically controlled, use DOF button to stop the lens down (also see point 2). Of course, ALWAYS position the filter by looking thru' the viewfinder...
 

nuxnewbie

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oh... one more thing... if using crop cameras, get the "hard" NDs

if using film / full frame, get "gradual" NDs
 

Evilmerlin

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Whats a hard ND?

I'll be getting those scew on ND Filters well, to try to get thosemisty water effects in the day time. Are those defined as Hard ND?

I'll definately be using a tripod for this, can't see myself one hand hold camera and another hand playing with filter.
 

ryuggen

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oh... one more thing... if using crop cameras, get the "hard" NDs

if using film / full frame, get "gradual" NDs
Hard ND is a distinct line betwen the clear and the ND.

Grad ND sets a gradual tone from ND to clear.


btw, why crop sensor needs hard ND instead of GND?
 

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