cleaning


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Nov 30, 2009
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#1
does canon warranty covers the cleaning of system?

if not, how much would it cost to be cleaned?
 

Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
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#3
Call up canon and ask. But if the mirror is damaged, you'll need to explain how it's a manufacturer flaw. If it's your negligence, you need to pay.
 

CS TAN

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Sep 3, 2007
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#4
User error or wear and tear? The most common damaged mirror will be for someone to try to mount a EF-S lens onto a non 1.6 crop body such as 5D / 5D Mark II.
 

torak

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Sep 4, 2009
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#5
User error or wear and tear? The most common damaged mirror will be for someone to try to mount a EF-S lens onto a non 1.6 crop body such as 5D / 5D Mark II.
why would mounting an APS-C lens onto a Full Frame body damage the mirror?

Sony DSLR users sometimes mount APS-C lenses onto the FF A850/A900 bodies, and theres no problems at all. The FF bodies even auto switch to an "APS-C" mode so that vignetting doesnt occur when using APS-C lenses on FF bodies.
 

Last edited:
Nov 30, 2009
51
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0
Singapore
#6
its more to user error ithink. my friend said he tried to "wipe" sumting on the mirror of his 450D which i dont know what the sumting is. haha.

now he say the inside is like not that clear. i tried looking at his 450D. cant really see anyting amiss. but he still claimed it's not normal.

i told him, he must be crazy doing that wiping... he has 3 mths of warranty to go.

if really own error, think how much would it cost?
 

torak

New Member
Sep 4, 2009
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#7
its more to user error ithink. my friend said he tried to "wipe" sumting on the mirror of his 450D which i dont know what the sumting is. haha.

now he say the inside is like not that clear. i tried looking at his 450D. cant really see anyting amiss. but he still claimed it's not normal.

i told him, he must be crazy doing that wiping... he has 3 mths of warranty to go.

if really own error, think how much would it cost?
probably dust patches or oil stains then, especially if the cloth he used is not clean. Or the liquid he uses for cleaning the mirror has some residues (common when using cheapo cleaning solution)

If its under warranty, cleaning should be free. U should call up Canon Service Centre to confirm though, as Im a Sony user and Sony service Centre covers DSLR sensor and interior cleaning for free. Im assuming Canon should cover it too.
 

Last edited:

Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
19,105
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#8
why would mounting an APS-C lens onto a Full Frame body damage the mirror?

Sony DSLR users sometimes mount APS-C lenses onto the FF A850/A900 bodies, and theres no problems at all. The FF bodies even auto switch to an "APS-C" mode so that vignetting doesnt occur when using APS-C lenses on FF bodies.
Canon system is different from Sony system. There's not enough mirror clearance if you use aps-c lenses on a canon FF body.
 

CS TAN

Senior Member
Sep 3, 2007
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Hong Kong
#10
why would mounting an APS-C lens onto a Full Frame body damage the mirror?

Sony DSLR users sometimes mount APS-C lenses onto the FF A850/A900 bodies, and theres no problems at all. The FF bodies even auto switch to an "APS-C" mode so that vignetting doesnt occur when using APS-C lenses on FF bodies.
Canon EF-S lenses are built to prevent their being mounted on any camera that is not designed to receive them.

This rubber stopper will hit the mirror (and most likely damage it). By taking it out, you should be able to mount it on FF bodies but since EFS lenses are designed for crop bodies, do expect vignetting and other image degradation around the edges of the FF camera images. When a lens is designed to fill only a 15 x 22.5mm image space, it surely won't completely fill a 24 x 36mm film frame or DSLR sensor with the same quality image as the APS-C camera would capture.

 

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