Circular Polarizer vs linear Polarizer


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oryzain

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Jan 16, 2007
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#1
I have been a user of film SLR and switched to dSLR. I feel the effects of Cricular polarizer are not as good as the linear polarizer. Do you guys have any thoughts on this? or Is it sometime to do with the way I am using it?
:nono: :nono:
 

OlyFlyer

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Mar 22, 2006
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#4
I have been a user of film SLR and switched to dSLR. I feel the effects of Cricular polarizer are not as good as the linear polarizer. Do you guys have any thoughts on this? or Is it sometime to do with the way I am using it?
:nono: :nono:
When I switched to digital I decided to test my linear polarizer and came to the conclusion that it works without any problems. As far as I know it has even better effects than the circular. All that talk about AF or exposure or WB not working is just talk. Maybe it is my camera (E-500) or my lenses but I definitely suggest you try first before spending extra money on something that is not necessary. I think most people who dare try linear pl has the same experience, anyway it is definitely not my individual camera or lenses.
 

Jan 14, 2005
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#5
When I switched to digital I decided to test my linear polarizer and came to the conclusion that it works without any problems. As far as I know it has even better effects than the circular. All that talk about AF or exposure or WB not working is just talk. Maybe it is my camera (E-500) or my lenses but I definitely suggest you try first before spending extra money on something that is not necessary. I think most people who dare try linear pl has the same experience, anyway it is definitely not my individual camera or lenses.
:think: That's good. Does it work at all polarising angles? AF might work. How about matrix metering?

However, my camera manual (D80) specifically says no linear polariser. I don't have a linear polariser to try out unfortunately. I am curious to know whether AF and metering will work with linear polarisers. Linear polarisers are supposed to be more effective.

BC
 

OlyFlyer

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Mar 22, 2006
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#6
:think: That's good. Does it work at all polarising angles? AF might work. How about matrix metering?

However, my camera manual (D80) specifically says no linear polariser. I don't have a linear polariser to try out unfortunately. I am curious to know whether AF and metering will work with linear polarisers. Linear polarisers are supposed to be more effective.

BC
I have an Olympus and with my camera it works as it worked on my old film camera. All meterring modes and AF works as well, but I have no idea how it would behave on your Nikon. I think you can get a real chep one with scratches from ebay and test it and then if it works you can get a high quality. Still end up at half price and better polarizing effects if it works, if not, well, not much is lost, but a lot is learned. I think camera manufacturers always want us to buy their more expensive and new stuff. They never lead you to a cheaper solution. In my case, for exaple I also use Canon flash shoe cord 2 for half of Olympus FL-CB05 price with the same functionality.
 

lsisaxon

Senior Member
Nov 29, 2004
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#7
:think: That's good. Does it work at all polarising angles? AF might work. How about matrix metering?

However, my camera manual (D80) specifically says no linear polariser. I don't have a linear polariser to try out unfortunately. I am curious to know whether AF and metering will work with linear polarisers. Linear polarisers are supposed to be more effective.

BC
Since metering is done in the prism nowadays, it should work fine with lin pol. At certain polarising angles, however, the AF will start to hunt.
 

OlyFlyer

Senior Member
Mar 22, 2006
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#8
Since metering is done in the prism nowadays, it should work fine with lin pol. At certain polarising angles, however, the AF will start to hunt.
...yes, that is what everybody says. I have never had any problems with AF, I would guess that also depands on the lens' maximum aperture. The brighter the lens the better and easier for the camera to focus. If you take away light from an already dark lens it may not work. That is why I say, get a cheap filter and test with the specific camera and lens.
 

lsisaxon

Senior Member
Nov 29, 2004
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#9
...yes, that is what everybody says. I have never had any problems with AF, I would guess that also depands on the lens' maximum aperture. The brighter the lens the better and easier for the camera to focus. If you take away light from an already dark lens it may not work. That is why I say, get a cheap filter and test with the specific camera and lens.
Yes, I fully agree with that. Usually, if the light is sufficient, it should be ok because because the light reaching the sensor will not be fully cut also.
 

cichlid

Senior Member
Dec 2, 2006
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#10
Hi all

Can OT abit?

Will the use of a polarizr reduce chromatic aberration ?

TIA
 

lsisaxon

Senior Member
Nov 29, 2004
11,941
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#11
Hi all

Can OT abit?

Will the use of a polarizr reduce chromatic aberration ?

TIA
Erm... No.. I don't think so. Chromatic aberration is due to dispersion so no matter how much light you try to cut out in whatever polarization, the colours will still disperse if the lens is inherently unable to focus the colours together.
 

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