Circular Polarizer... How to use?


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mrericlee

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Sep 27, 2008
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#1
Bought one... but since it is dark, will my shutter speed auto compensate for it?

Also, what is the typical way to dial in the setting?

Any good sites?
 

Octarine

Moderator
Staff member
Jan 3, 2008
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Pasir Ris
#6
Thanks guys.... what is a good brand? B+W? or Nikon? Hoya?
Good is what fulfills your requirements. Have you defined this? Whether you want to pay the respective price is a different question. You can have a look at the price list for filters here in the forum.
 

Anson

Senior Member
Jul 31, 2006
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ansonchew.com
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#7
I am curious too... what separate the quality of the CPL? I understand that Hoya lens are manufactured by Tokina... are they same lens with different branding? :think:
 

Kit

Senior Member
Jan 19, 2002
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#10
I always recommend Nikon polarisers simply because they are much more efficiently as far as light loss is concerned. With Hoyas and the likes, I typically loose around 1.5 to 2 stops. With Nikons, its only around 1/3 to 1/2 a stop.
 

#11
Bought one... but since it is dark, will my shutter speed auto compensate for it?

Also, what is the typical way to dial in the setting?

Any good sites?
Some camera manufacturers (and pros) have suggested using center weighted or spot metering on your camera. My CPLs work fine with matrix metering. I tend to use Aperature Priority mode and leave the shutter speed to auto compensate. Works fine for all my photos so far.

You can always try directing your questions by email to the following filters retailer at :-

http://www.2filter.com/

This is a specialised camera filters shop and have a good reputation in the States.
 

#12
Thanks guys.... what is a good brand? B+W? or Nikon? Hoya?
Here's a concise summary of each :-

B+W MRC -> The "rolls royce" of filters. MRC coating is easy to clean as compared with Hoya.

Hoya -> High quality cheaper alternative to B+W. However, some users complain that smudges are difficult to clean.

Nikon -> Slim CP II filters are highly recommended especially in order to prevent vignetting on wide-angled lenses. Very high quality too.
 

mrericlee

New Member
Sep 27, 2008
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#16
Here's a concise summary of each :-

B+W MRC -> The "rolls royce" of filters. MRC coating is easy to clean as compared with Hoya.

Hoya -> High quality cheaper alternative to B+W. However, some users complain that smudges are difficult to clean.

Nikon -> Slim CP II filters are highly recommended especially in order to prevent vignetting on wide-angled lenses. Very high quality too.
I bought the "rolls royce" and took some shot with some sky. Didn't show bluish at all. Effect way below expectations but sky was cloudy. Will try again.

QUESTION:

Do I have to keep switching filters? Meaning CPL only for shots with sky or water. Then, if I shoot portraits, people, flowers, etc... I need to change back to my UV filter?

It's quite troublesome. Had this problem at Sentosa flower event. Not all pics had sky or water and I kept thinking if I should remove the filter.
 

Baracus

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Mar 24, 2008
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#17
I bought the "rolls royce" and took some shot with some sky. Didn't show bluish at all. Effect way below expectations but sky was cloudy. Will try again.
Aim 90 deg from the sun for best effect. On a sunny, cloudless day.


Do I have to keep switching filters? Meaning CPL only for shots with sky or water. Then, if I shoot portraits, people, flowers, etc... I need to change back to my UV filter?

It's quite troublesome. Had this problem at Sentosa flower event. Not all pics had sky or water and I kept thinking if I should remove the filter.
Nobody said taking good photographs was easy. When you're feeling lazy, use a compact camera instead. I know I do.
 

Octarine

Moderator
Staff member
Jan 3, 2008
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Pasir Ris
#18
I bought the "rolls royce" and took some shot with some sky. Didn't show bluish at all. Effect way below expectations but sky was cloudy. Will try again.
Read more: http://www.great-landscape-photography.com/polarizing-filter.html
If there is no blue sky then no filter will 'generate' it for you.

Do I have to keep switching filters? Meaning CPL only for shots with sky or water. Then, if I shoot portraits, people, flowers, etc... I need to change back to my UV filter?
It's quite troublesome. Had this problem at Sentosa flower event. Not all pics had sky or water and I kept thinking if I should remove the filter.
First you could dump your UV filters, quite useless (imho). Your camera doesn't need any UV protection (lenses filter already, the sensor has a filter, too) and for protection a lens hood serves better. If you insist on UV for your peace of mind then you need to change. Otherwise (meaning you stack CPL on top of UV) you might get vignetting (dark corners in the picture).
First: get clear about what you want to shoot. No point jumping between beach and flowers and screwing filters on and off. Stick to one object / scenery. Secondly: filters have a purpose and effect. If you intend to use this effect then put on the filter, if not then just don't do. Filters are an optional element for certain conditions, they are not compulsory in general.
 

Octarine

Moderator
Staff member
Jan 3, 2008
12,516
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Pasir Ris
#20
Thanks for the link, I saw it before my post but the Nikon's CPL filter is not included in the list and the last update is 2 years ago... :(
Scroll down, in the Nikon posting there's a 77mm CPL II (IIRC, that's the slim version). The prices are still somewhat valid. Compare with the MO threads and you'll see that 77mm B+W still goes for about SGD 110. Check here. (MO saves the few bucks that go for shop rental and aircon.)
 

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