Chinese Furniture


neon2

New Member
Jan 29, 2009
232
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0
35
#1
1. In what area is critique to be sought?
Composition, colour and mood that is portraited to you, the viewer.

2. What one hopes to achieve with the piece of work?
When I saw the scene that eventually produced this photo, there was a connection between the colour of the light, chinese calligraphy, the furniture in the background and the pillar. All these elements are sort of chinese related. Therefore, in my photo I am trying to capture the relationships between these elements.

3. Under what circumstance is the picture taken? (physical conditions/emotions)
At night at Nankin Row, near China Square. The lighting was dim and my tripod was in use by my friend, so the ISO was 800. The photo was taken out of creativity during a casual walkabout.

4. What the critique seeker personally thinks of the picture
I think the chinese theme substance in the photo can be captured better but I was limited by the capability of my lenses available. I had to use the fastest lens I have to take this photo because the lighting is too dim. The most interesting aspect in this photo is the big writing of "furniture" on the pillar and the partial appearance of the furniture in the pitch dark background. I especially liked the colour too. Maybe you will feel the colour is a bit off, this is because I am colour deficient. In case you are not familiar with mandarin, the 2 words on the pillar literally means "furniture".

 

tkmtkm

New Member
Apr 12, 2010
47
0
0
#4
Problem is the whole furniture is not shown. Also, problem with lighting - the whole word is not uniformly exposed. A wireless flash onto the back of the furniture might do the trick.
 

neon2

New Member
Jan 29, 2009
232
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#5
Problem is the whole furniture is not shown. Also, problem with lighting - the whole word is not uniformly exposed. A wireless flash onto the back of the furniture might do the trick.
Yeah I totally agree with you. The furniture only half shown and the exposure is not ideal. I had my wireless flash with me but at that moment I thought it will be good to maintain the scene's original lighting condition. Anyway, I can't put my flash at the back of the furniture because it is enclosed in a shop that had called it a day. Thanks for your comments!
 

cityhunter66

Deregistered
May 5, 2010
142
0
0
#6
1. In what area is critique to be sought?
Composition, colour and mood that is portraited to you, the viewer.

2. What one hopes to achieve with the piece of work?
When I saw the scene that eventually produced this photo, there was a connection between the colour of the light, chinese calligraphy, the furniture in the background and the pillar. All these elements are sort of chinese related. Therefore, in my photo I am trying to capture the relationships between these elements.

3. Under what circumstance is the picture taken? (physical conditions/emotions)
At night at Nankin Row, near China Square. The lighting was dim and my tripod was in use by my friend, so the ISO was 800. The photo was taken out of creativity during a casual walkabout.

4. What the critique seeker personally thinks of the picture
I think the chinese theme substance in the photo can be captured better but I was limited by the capability of my lenses available. I had to use the fastest lens I have to take this photo because the lighting is too dim. The most interesting aspect in this photo is the big writing of "furniture" on the pillar and the partial appearance of the furniture in the pitch dark background. I especially liked the colour too. Maybe you will feel the colour is a bit off, this is because I am colour deficient. In case you are not familiar with mandarin, the 2 words on the pillar literally means "furniture".
Perhaps if the furniture could be seen in the background, even dimly, would have been nicer...
 

cabbySHE

New Member
Dec 5, 2008
1,553
0
0
#7
Thought I would see some refine Ching or Ming dynasty craftsmanship, but disappointed totally.
 

pokiemon

Senior Member
Mar 5, 2005
2,039
0
0
#8
sorry where is the chinese furniture??? or maybe this is too abstract for me.
 

neon2

New Member
Jan 29, 2009
232
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0
35
#9
Thought I would see some refine Ching or Ming dynasty craftsmanship, but disappointed totally.
sorry where is the chinese furniture??? or maybe this is too abstract for me.
Thanks for your comments. You guys have just added another dimension of idea into my learning process. Next time I will put in more effort in the title thinking process. By the way, the furniture is in the background. The background is too dark so only the bottom part of the furniture is revealed.
 

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