China-made Flash


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lierudy

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Dec 11, 2008
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#1

eow

Senior Member
Jun 22, 2004
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#2
mchaint is selling it and it come with warranty
 

Moonlightsg

Senior Member
Jan 28, 2010
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#3
Sorry, borrow and ask.
this flash light can use in N and C also?
but k-7 and K-x cannot use N 's flash?

is there a standard to follow and look for?
is it P-TTL?
 

eow

Senior Member
Jun 22, 2004
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#4
it more for off camera flash use
full manual, no p-ttl
 

Baracus

New Member
Mar 24, 2008
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The Far East
#5
Guys.. need your opinion on china made Flash.
Any body used this "cheap" flash before?

I got one reference from ebay..
http://cgi.ebay.com/YN460-Mark-II-Flash-Speedlite-for-Canon-Nikon-Pentax_W0QQitemZ260540691745QQcmdZViewItemQQptZDigital_Camera_Flashes?hash=item3ca96f7521#ht_5798wt_1165

I know that someone is selling this in singapore.

Is this good? any other china-made brand?
*Raises hand*
Got it early this year and played with it a couple of times. Love the flash fine-tuning up to 1/64 power, but the LED indicator can be a bit bright in situations...

Build, reliability and power output has been upgraded, but it does misfire rarely. (But that may be due to the China PT04-II trigger as well) :dunno:

Some newbie strobist shots...




Other China brands are Nissin and Tumax, I think.

Sorry, borrow and ask.
this flash light can use in N and C also?
but k-7 and K-x cannot use N 's flash?

is there a standard to follow and look for?
is it P-TTL?
Since it's a fully manual flash (No TTL/P-TTL), it works on any camera brand as long as the hotshoe fits. I think Sony/Minolta uses it's own hotshoe shape.

I've used Nikon SB26/600 on my K10D with no problem.
 

poppyer

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Jun 24, 2009
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#6
Sorry, borrow and ask.
this flash light can use in N and C also?
but k-7 and K-x cannot use N 's flash?

is there a standard to follow and look for?
is it P-TTL?
no, this one is purely manual, so can fit in CNP.
for pure manual flash, you need to calculate the output by yourself (if you are good at math, but that is no big deal just need more practice). and set it manually each time. the bigger issue is that the recharging speed is usually slow, 5-10s typically.


BTW, I have an semi-auto one might want to let go (but not TTL). semi-auto means it has an internal sensor the automatically cutoff the light (and therefore recharging much quicker). So usually work, but sometimes not as accurate as PTTL especially if the environment are complicated. Anybody interested can PM me.

I think generally pure manual flash is okay for studio-like setting when you have enough time to do all the preparations.
 

Jan 16, 2009
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#7
Calculating the output is quite easy.

Estimate the distance to the subject in meters (e.g. 5 meters). If you not sure, you can focus first then read the focus distance off the marking on the lens.

Multiply the distance by the aperture f-number (e.g. 3.5), so 5 x 3.5 = 17.5

Take the guide number of the flash (38 for the YN460), multiply by the square root of your ISO (e.g. 400) divided by 100. So sq root of 400/100 = sqrt(4) = 2, then 38 x 2 = 76.

Now divide 76 by 17.5... 76/17.5 = 4.34 Take this number and set it to the nearest flash power ratio, i.e. 1/4


Once you get the hang of it, you can work it all out very fast in your mind, faster than using one of the more expensive P-TTL lenses.

Or not :D
 

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poppyer

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Jun 24, 2009
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#8
.....

Take the guide number of the flash (38 for the YN460), multiply by your ISO (e.g. 200) and divide by 100. So 38 * 200 / 100 = 76
I think should add a squared root here? i.e. ISO200 should be 38*sqrt(200/100).
or in short factor 1.4 for ISO200, factor 2 for ISO400, factor 2.8 for ISO800, ...etc.
math is always tricky. :D
 

poppyer

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Jun 24, 2009
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#10

Baracus

New Member
Mar 24, 2008
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#11
Calculating the output is quite easy.

Estimate the distance to the subject in meters (e.g. 5 meters). If you not sure, you can focus first then read the focus distance off the marking on the lens.

Multiply the distance by the aperture f-number (e.g. 3.5), so 5 x 3.5 = 17.5

Take the guide number of the flash (38 for the YN460), multiply by the square root of your ISO (e.g. 400) divided by 100. So sq root of 400/100 = sqrt(4) = 2, then 38 x 2 = 76.

Now divide 76 by 17.5... 76/17.5 = 4.34 Take this number and set it to the nearest flash power ratio, i.e. 1/4


Once you get the hang of it, you can work it all out very fast in your mind, faster than using one of the more expensive P-TTL lenses.

Or not :D
The numbers! They blind me more than the flash! :confused: :bsmilie:

I just take a few test shots and adjust parameters accordingly. (even in the field) I'd rather think about angles and composition than punching numbers. Better yet, get a light meter. ;)

Edit:
@poppyer: Ah, I remember using that table on my old Metz flash. It's handy all right. Too bad the circuitry died.
 

Last edited:

darrrrrrrrrr

Senior Member
Sep 19, 2006
3,209
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Singapore
#12
Calculating the output is quite easy.

Estimate the distance to the subject in meters (e.g. 5 meters). If you not sure, you can focus first then read the focus distance off the marking on the lens.

Multiply the distance by the aperture f-number (e.g. 3.5), so 5 x 3.5 = 17.5

Take the guide number of the flash (38 for the YN460), multiply by the square root of your ISO (e.g. 400) divided by 100. So sq root of 400/100 = sqrt(4) = 2, then 38 x 2 = 76.

Now divide 76 by 17.5... 76/17.5 = 4.34 Take this number and set it to the nearest flash power ratio, i.e. 1/4


Once you get the hang of it, you can work it all out very fast in your mind, faster than using one of the more expensive P-TTL lenses.

Or not :D
that's if you are using direct flash, which you should avoid, unless you are doing strobist off-camera lighting. once you start bouncing flash then you can't do that anymore right?
 

daredevil123

Moderator
Staff member
Oct 25, 2005
21,660
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lil red dot
#13
Other China brands are Nissin and Tumax, I think.



Since it's a fully manual flash (No TTL/P-TTL), it works on any camera brand as long as the hotshoe fits. I think Sony/Minolta uses it's own hotshoe shape.

I've used Nikon SB26/600 on my K10D with no problem.
Nissin is a japanese brand. But products are made in China but many products are made in china, including big brand name stuff.

Nissin 622 and 866 are also fully compatible with Nikon and Canon's native wireless TTL flash systems.
 

Jan 16, 2009
898
0
0
#14
Yours is auto though, luckily. Don't have to calculate as much as full manual.

that's if you are using direct flash, which you should avoid, unless you are doing strobist off-camera lighting. once you start bouncing flash then you can't do that anymore right?
Yea, that assumes direct flash. With bounce flash, I suppose you have to factor on surface reflectivity, bounce distance, etc :bsmilie: I think better to just trial-and-error or use auto/p-ttl :D
 

lierudy

New Member
Dec 11, 2008
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#15
that's if you are using direct flash, which you should avoid, unless you are doing strobist off-camera lighting. once you start bouncing flash then you can't do that anymore right?
We'll need a notebook handy to calculate?? :cool::D
I guess at the end it will boil down to feeling and exp?

Thanks all for the comments/advice.
 

sircam

New Member
May 21, 2007
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#16
With bounce flash, I suppose you have to factor on surface reflectivity, bounce distance, etc.
Yup. Absolutely right.

My advice to those investing in flash units for the first time... go for the very best units. You won't have to bother too much about all these factors such as ceiling reflectivity, bounce distance, etc. A good capable flash unit makes things easy for you! Most of these can be used in dumb auto modes as well. Its those silly cheapo unknown brand ones which are often a hassle for newbies!

If your first experience with a flash is negative, you will always tend to hate using them!

If you first experience is positive, there is a greater chance you will learn more complex ways to use flash effectively to enhance the appeal of your images.

However, if you are already aware of the basics and have adequate experience, then just about any flash will suit your needs if you understand their quirks and limitations. Brand, price, etc. don't really matter too much then.
 

Moonlightsg

Senior Member
Jan 28, 2010
764
1
18
#17
Yup. Absolutely right.

My advice to those investing in flash units for the first time... go for the very best units. You won't have to bother too much about all these factors such as ceiling reflectivity, bounce distance, etc. A good capable flash unit makes things easy for you! Most of these can be used in dumb auto modes as well. Its those silly cheapo unknown brand ones which are often a hassle for newbies!

If your first experience with a flash is negative, you will always tend to hate using them!

If you first experience is positive, there is a greater chance you will learn more complex ways to use flash effectively to enhance the appeal of your images.

However, if you are already aware of the basics and have adequate experience, then just about any flash will suit your needs if you understand their quirks and limitations. Brand, price, etc. don't really matter too much then.
so what are the more idiot proof flash light to recommand?
i am not going to buy so soon... just want to know so i can read up more on it...:)
 

CorneliusK

Senior Member
Jan 23, 2010
790
0
16
#18
So how about the AF360FGZ? Good?

I'm using a K-x now.
 

Jan 16, 2009
898
0
0
#19
AF360FGZ is good until you need to bounce flash off the ceiling while taking portraits-orientation shots...
 

iFoto

New Member
Apr 18, 2007
113
0
0
North
#20
Calculating the output is quite easy.

Estimate the distance to the subject in meters (e.g. 5 meters). If you not sure, you can focus first then read the focus distance off the marking on the lens.

Multiply the distance by the aperture f-number (e.g. 3.5), so 5 x 3.5 = 17.5

Take the guide number of the flash (38 for the YN460), multiply by the square root of your ISO (e.g. 400) divided by 100. So sq root of 400/100 = sqrt(4) = 2, then 38 x 2 = 76.

Now divide 76 by 17.5... 76/17.5 = 4.34 Take this number and set it to the nearest flash power ratio, i.e. 1/4


Once you get the hang of it, you can work it all out very fast in your mind, faster than using one of the more expensive P-TTL lenses.

Or not :D
Oh that is simple!
It might be good if can buy a manual flash with build-in scientific calculator, then we can forget about this crazy P-TTL. Ha Ha!
 

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