Cheapest lab for Xpro


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muthusalami

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Jan 25, 2007
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kimtian cheaper. its at hong lim complex
 

muthusalami

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Jan 25, 2007
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if im not wrong. processing and scanning is $10/roll.
 

gangeslim

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Oct 20, 2006
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processing includes xpro?!?!
if yes then i running down there this weekend
 

muthusalami

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Jan 25, 2007
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yeahh should be la. very good deal hor. i also running down soon to get my roll processed.
 

w.s.y

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Nov 14, 2005
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Hi juz wondering how much does Ruby charges for xpro?
 

gangeslim

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yeahh should be la. very good deal hor. i also running down soon to get my roll processed.
yah super good deal if got include scanning
my usual lab at the hdb there needs me to consolidate at least 10 rolls before the uncle can do or else not economical for me. ;p
 

w.s.y

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Nov 14, 2005
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Hi guys,

wanna find out from u guys, how much is the price range for most 120mm film? and processing and print it will roughly cost how much in normal shops???
 

casey4355

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Oct 11, 2006
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i called up ruby, turn around is 5 days. sounds like eternity.
any faster places ?
 

TrailsofLife

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Jul 6, 2004
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Abit OT, I read in flickr sometime ago, a lady used coffee to process her negatives, very interesting, maybe you guys want to check it out.
 

ullyss

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Jun 16, 2003
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Coffee Developing receipe

Havn't tried it yet, so don't know if it works. Results will vary from different types of film.
Not tried it coz Coffee more ex than buying developer mah

Coffee contains several reducing agents capable of reducing exposed silver halide to metallic silver. Among these there are
tannins, sugars, catechols, polyphenols, and the most powerful:
Caffeic Acid, which is a complex form of Cinammic acid. (simple Cinammic acid, however, has no reducing power, but a legion of other organic acids present in coffee, may)
Vitamins in coffee, like Niacin (vitamin B3) Ascorbic Acid (vitamin C) and other strong reducing compounds are partially destroyed or transformed in the process of roasting. There are many factors influencing the rate of development, the contrast, the amount of coffee stain and the fog level of the coffee developed image. Among these are:

-Acidity
-Type of Coffee
-Type of alkaline activator
-Concentration


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Recipe
340g distilled Water
6 teaspoon instant coffee granule crystals
3 teaspoon sodium carbonate or "Sal Soda - the brand"

Method
1. Mix all the ingredients for 5mins
2. Add the mixed developer to the developing tank, agitate every 30sec for 25min at room temperature
3. Empty developer washing with Water til its clear
4. Add Fixer, for 3mins
5. Wash the film for 5 mins, with the final wash adding 1 drop of washing liquid
6. Hang the film up, spray distilled water , leave to dry


Here's the old receipe from Shutterbug

Developer Components
The two most essential ingredients of a photographic developer are a developing agent (a reducing agent) and an activator. Caffeine, that magical component of coffee, tea, and many soft drinks, is an excellent reducer and can work well as a developing agent. Vitamin C can also do the job, as well as vanilla extract, iron supplement tablets, and a number of other common materials when properly applied.

Brew A Pot Of Developer
Caffeine is one of the best, and it’s simple to use. Coffee or tea can be the source, but coffee may be preferable because of its higher caffeine content. So if you want to try your own skill at kitchen chemistry processing, here’s a plan: First get a jar of instant coffee crystals at your local supermarket. Next head to the laundry detergent aisle and pick up a box of washing soda. That’s the stuff that will activate the developing agent, the caffeine in the instant coffee. With the wide variety of laundry materials available today, washing soda isn’t the big seller that it once was, but the larger chains will carry it. (Baking soda just won’t do.)
That’s all you need. And here’s a recipe for making a half pint of developer, enough to process a roll of 35mm film in a typical developing tank.

8 oz of water
4 teaspoons of instant coffee crystals
2 teaspoons of washing soda

Stir the ingredients until uniform, then develop film for 25 minutes, agitating every 30 seconds.
This simple formula will develop any silver-halide emulsion, but for best results you’ll need to experiment to determine the optimum composition and development time for the particular film and exposure level you use. I used only Kodak T-Max 400, exposed at ISO 100.

If the idea of working in a darkroom with the pleasant aroma of fresh-brewed coffee sounds appealing—don’t count on that. The activator degrades some of the components of coffee, and the solution will soon take on the odor of the coffee pot you forgot to turn off the night before. Not the most pleasant sensation!

Developing With Vitamins
If you’re not into coffee all that much and want to still try another alternative process, think vitamin C. Citrus fruits and fruit juices immediately come to mind as good sources of vitamin C. Unfortunately, though, that vitamin is not in high enough concentration in these juices to serve as an effective developing agent. You’ll need to turn to the medicine cabinet and get out the vitamin C tablets. Vitamin C can nicely replace coffee as the developing agent, but because vitamin C is more acidic than caffeine, a larger quantity of activator will be required. Here’s a workable composition:

8 oz of water
8 vitamin C tablets (1000mg each)
5 teaspoons of washing soda
Develop for 30 minutes, agitating every 30 seconds.

Film development with either of these concoctions—the coffee brew or the vitamin C mix—is straightforward and simple. And what will you have in the end? A strip of negatives with all the requirements for producing good prints. The negatives may not have as clean and crisp an appearance as you’re accustomed to seeing, but don’t be deceived. A remarkable level of detail is there, and with a little effort you can generate prints of surprising quality. Try it and see.

Simple Stop And Fix
Now what about the stop bath and fixer? The local grocer has these, too. Many photographers (including this one) use only a thorough water rinse as a stop bath for film development. But if quick-stop action is desired, a dilute vinegar solution works well.

For fixing, ordinary saltwater will do. In fact, seawater was long ago used as the very first successful fixing agent. The process is slow, however, and very inefficient compared to the action of modern fixing solutions. It takes a lot of saltwater, but it can be done.
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Here's the website that uses coffee developer

http://www.costaricacoffeeart.com/
 

muthusalami

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Jan 25, 2007
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ive seen my friend do before. results very grainy
 

doUbleCHIN

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May 10, 2004
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U can try Grace digital Lab at clementi blk 105 #01-04. I got mine in 1/2 to 1 hour but of course depends the "traffic" la!.
 

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