Changing lens with power on or off


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Joywalker

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I went out shooting today and decided to change my lens on my 350D.
After I was done,I then realised I didn't switch off the power before I change.
Does it matter? Didn't have problems after I did that and kept on shooting.

Just curious how many people here leaves the power on while changing lens.:)
 

sk.images

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I've never bothered to switch off the power on my old SLR or on my new DSLR's.

I've never heard or read anything to suggest that it would be a problem.
 

nightwolf75

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cyber_m0nkey said:
I've never bothered to switch off the power on my old SLR or on my new DSLR's.

I've never heard or read anything to suggest that it would be a problem.
well, the theory is dat the charged sensor (CMOS in this case) will attract dust. dats why some folks recommend powering off the camera when changing lenses.

for SLRs, shldn't be a problem even if u leave the power on.
 

Snoweagle

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nightwolf75 said:
well, the theory is dat the charged sensor (CMOS in this case) will attract dust. dats why some folks recommend powering off the camera when changing lenses.

for SLRs, shldn't be a problem even if u leave the power on.
I never turn off my SLR when changing lens regardless of what i'm taking. It's also faster this way.
 

custom_biker

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I have noticed something strange with my 350D... If I change lenses with the power on, sometimes the Exposure compensation (AEB) behaves strangely. Instead of centering at 0 it centers on 1 or 2. As a result my pictures come out overexposed.

The only way to fix this is to reset all camera settings. Well this doesnot happen everytime but it does happen quite frequently to bother me. And this has happened with both Canon lenses and 3rd party lenses like Tamron / Sigma.

Moral of the story : It is better to change lenses when your SLR is powered down. Unless u love resetting your camera every now and then :)
 

Snoweagle

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For DSLRs it's better to power off the camera as it has a charged sensor inside and there's a tendency to attract dust which can be a real headache to clean.
 

+evenstar

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Snoweagle said:
For DSLRs it's better to power off the camera as it has a charged sensor inside and there's a tendency to attract dust which can be a real headache to clean.
regarding charged sensors, isn't there a mirror and a shutter that's covering the sensor? :think:
 

evo76

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+evenstar said:
regarding charged sensors, isn't there a mirror and a shutter that's covering the sensor? :think:
There is a lot of space between the lens and the mirror. Dust that gets in remains circulated in there and will bind to the sensor whenever the mirror flips and the shutter opens.
 

Snoweagle

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+evenstar said:
regarding charged sensors, isn't there a mirror and a shutter that's covering the sensor? :think:
evo76 is right. To add to this, if my sealed EOS 30 LCD can have a speck of dust entering inside, then isn't the sensor area more vulnerable??
 

Dunnomuch

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IIRC, the CMOS sensors in the EOS DSLRs are not charged all the time. they are charged only at the moment the picture is taken - i.e. when the shutter release is pressed.

the older 1D and earlier DSLRs that had CCD sensors, yes. the CCD is always on when the camera is on, hence the dust attrraction theory and this also logically accounts for the poorer battery life on CCD sensor DSLRs.

so if the CMOS sensors in our DSLRs are not charged when on, then the dust attraction logic doesn't hold true when changing lenses right?

I think this info can be found on some other forums too.
 

John Tan

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Dunnomuch said:
IIRC, the CMOS sensors in the EOS DSLRs are not charged all the time. they are charged only at the moment the picture is taken - i.e. when the shutter release is pressed.

the older 1D and earlier DSLRs that had CCD sensors, yes. the CCD is always on when the camera is on, hence the dust attrraction theory and this also logically accounts for the poorer battery life on CCD sensor DSLRs.

so if the CMOS sensors in our DSLRs are not charged when on, then the dust attraction logic doesn't hold true when changing lenses right?

I think this info can be found on some other forums too.
I learn something today...btw I have no problem with CMOS cleaning either...
 

Snoweagle

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Dunnomuch said:
IIRC, the CMOS sensors in the EOS DSLRs are not charged all the time. they are charged only at the moment the picture is taken - i.e. when the shutter release is pressed.

the older 1D and earlier DSLRs that had CCD sensors, yes. the CCD is always on when the camera is on, hence the dust attrraction theory and this also logically accounts for the poorer battery life on CCD sensor DSLRs.

so if the CMOS sensors in our DSLRs are not charged when on, then the dust attraction logic doesn't hold true when changing lenses right?

I think this info can be found on some other forums too.
That's a gd enlightenment :)
 

harrynkl

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Dunnomuch said:
IIRC, the CMOS sensors in the EOS DSLRs are not charged all the time. they are charged only at the moment the picture is taken - i.e. when the shutter release is pressed.

the older 1D and earlier DSLRs that had CCD sensors, yes. the CCD is always on when the camera is on, hence the dust attrraction theory and this also logically accounts for the poorer battery life on CCD sensor DSLRs.

so if the CMOS sensors in our DSLRs are not charged when on, then the dust attraction logic doesn't hold true when changing lenses right?

I think this info can be found on some other forums too.
learn a new thing today thxs bro:thumbsup:
 

Steplim

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Dunnomuch said:
IIRC, the CMOS sensors in the EOS DSLRs are not charged all the time. they are charged only at the moment the picture is taken - i.e. when the shutter release is pressed.

the older 1D and earlier DSLRs that had CCD sensors, yes. the CCD is always on when the camera is on, hence the dust attrraction theory and this also logically accounts for the poorer battery life on CCD sensor DSLRs.

so if the CMOS sensors in our DSLRs are not charged when on, then the dust attraction logic doesn't hold true when changing lenses right?

I think this info can be found on some other forums too.

Though you call yourself "Dunnomuch" but you know alot :bsmilie: . Yes, learnt something new from u too.:thumbsup:

By the way, what about CF card? Will there be a problem, if you take out or insert CF card while power on.??
 

blimmer

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buffer images gone, possible image naming error
as for the rest the wise Dunnomuch could shed more light ;)
 

Goldenstars08

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On when changing lens...off it after changed...;p
Is all depend on personal...:)
 

Dunnomuch

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Steplim said:
Though you call yourself "Dunnomuch" but you know alot :bsmilie: . Yes, learnt something new from u too.:thumbsup:

By the way, what about CF card? Will there be a problem, if you take out or insert CF card while power on.??

Paiseh.. please, i really dunnomuch. hehe. photography is a new hobby for me and i am still learning as much as a newbie can learn.

When you open the CF door, the camera already shuts off, and if at the time you do this, the CF card write light is still blinking, then habis.. say byebye to those pictures still in the buffer that were in transit to the card.

so i think you can't take out the card with the power on. once you open the CF card door, the camera shuts off. at least it does on my 20D. AFAIK, it's not a good idea to yank out the CF card when your camera is on. What are you planning to do with the CF while the power is on? street magic? heeheehee
 

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