Canon 5DmkII or 7D


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Hobbes00

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Which DSLR should I get!!!!! To take videos of cos :)
 

Reportage

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Which DSLR should I get!!!!! To take videos of cos :)
video part, both are more or less equal....is there anything on the camera side that you need between the two?
 

brianop87

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7D for video is very good...esp can control the shutter speed..which 5DMkII cannot...
Slower shutter speed can produce smoother movement in video;)...

For the lens 10-22, and sigma 30, must be nice
 

roofies

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7D for video is very good...esp can control the shutter speed..which 5DMkII cannot...
Slower shutter speed can produce smoother movement in video;)...

For the lens 10-22, and sigma 30, must be nice
dude...5dmkii also offers full manual control...

the 7d triumphs with variable framerates but at the cost of higher operating temperatures
 

roofies

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video part, both are more or less equal....is there anything on the camera side that you need between the two?
not really..the DOF on the 5D mkII can be alittle too thin for an inexperienced videographer...

The 7D gives the videographer a more useable DOF while still retaining a fair bit of its cinelook and feel.
 

jaegersing

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5D2 is limited to 30fps (not 29.97) so it is more tricky to mix the footage with videocam footage.

If you plan to continue shooting with videocam as well as DSLR, 7D is more flexible. Pity about the overheating problem though. I suppose if you are making a film with mostly short takes, it should not be a big issue.

Personally I will probably wait and see what the next phase of videocams has to offer.
 

Shen siung

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not really..the DOF on the 5D mkII can be alittle too thin for an inexperienced videographer...

The 7D gives the videographer a more useable DOF while still retaining a fair bit of its cinelook and feel.
Oh, I never thought about "the DOF on the 5D mkII can be alittle too thin" as an issue. Can elaborate a bit more?

I was wonder, the ability of thin DOF is a good point of 5DII... I mean we can set smaller aperture if don't need shallow DOF right?
 

roofies

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Oh, I never thought about "the DOF on the 5D mkII can be alittle too thin" as an issue. Can elaborate a bit more?

I was wonder, the ability of thin DOF is a good point of 5DII... I mean we can set smaller aperture if don't need shallow DOF right?
you could set a smaller aperture, but videography is not like photography, to certain extent, you might not have as much headroom to play with your shutter speed if you want to close up your aperture.

=)
 

Shen siung

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you could set a smaller aperture, but videography is not like photography, to certain extent, you might not have as much headroom to play with your shutter speed if you want to close up your aperture.

=)
I still not really understand...Maybe I'm not owning either camera... Example, if aperture about f8, then the shutter speed could be, say 1/20. But will this 1/20 affect? I thought when we take video, the shutter is always open? Ha ha, I am more confuse now...
 

engr

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the shutter speed in video is different from stills. You have this electronic shutter moving down in lines to read the data off the sensor like a rolling shutter. Anyway, I think roofies is refering to the difficulty of focusing due to the shallow DOF of FF sensor without auto focusing.
 

Shen siung

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Still confusing... anyway, maybe when I owned a video able DSLR, I will know...
 

jaegersing

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In video, you would not normally adjust shutter speed to control exposure. Changing the shutter changes the amount of motion blur which gives a different "feel" to the video. For 25fps video the standard shutter speed is 1/50s. You can set it slower (to exagerate MB) or faster (for when you want to slomo the shot, or for special crispy-looking effect on the video) but it's not so good if it is changing all the time for no reason.

For DOF control, of course you can close the aperture to widen the DOF, provided you have enough light. Outdoors should be no issue, but indoors where there is less light, and where you are unable to add lights, you either need to open the iris or increase the gain (ISO). Given the choice, I expect most people would open the iris rather than increase ISO, and when the lens is wide open or close to it, that's where you would have to cope with the thin DOF from the 5D2.

But I wouldn't count the thin DOF on the 5D2 as a point against it. If the DOF is too shallow, you can close the iris and compensate with ISO, which will give similar results as the 7D under the same conditions. And when you really want the thin DOF, it is available on the 5D2 but not on the 7D.

Anyway, as I mentioned before, I think the 7D is better overall for video because of the selectable frame rates. Compared with conventional videocams, both the 5D2 and 7D have phenomenal DOF range available and if I was planning to buy one of them for video shooting, this would not be a major factor in my decision.
 

Shen siung

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In video, you would not normally adjust shutter speed to control exposure. Changing the shutter changes the amount of motion blur which gives a different "feel" to the video. For 25fps video the standard shutter speed is 1/50s. You can set it slower (to exagerate MB) or faster (for when you want to slomo the shot, or for special crispy-looking effect on the video) but it's not so good if it is changing all the time for no reason.

For DOF control, of course you can close the aperture to widen the DOF, provided you have enough light. Outdoors should be no issue, but indoors where there is less light, and where you are unable to add lights, you either need to open the iris or increase the gain (ISO). Given the choice, I expect most people would open the iris rather than increase ISO, and when the lens is wide open or close to it, that's where you would have to cope with the thin DOF from the 5D2.

But I wouldn't count the thin DOF on the 5D2 as a point against it. If the DOF is too shallow, you can close the iris and compensate with ISO, which will give similar results as the 7D under the same conditions. And when you really want the thin DOF, it is available on the 5D2 but not on the 7D.

Anyway, as I mentioned before, I think the 7D is better overall for video because of the selectable frame rates. Compared with conventional videocams, both the 5D2 and 7D have phenomenal DOF range available and if I was planning to buy one of them for video shooting, this would not be a major factor in my decision.
Dear jaegersing,

thanks for your explanation, which makes me more clear now.
 

Hobbes00

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Richard my dear... you are a indeed a tech geek!
Have you got your 7D yet?! =)
I think I might either go with HPX-502, or a 7D with Steadicam Flyer :p
 

jaegersing

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Richard my dear... you are a indeed a tech geek!
Have you got your 7D yet?! =)
I think I might either go with HPX-502, or a 7D with Steadicam Flyer :p
I engineer mah, all the time having to explain technical things at work! :)

I am reluctant to get the 7D because of the overheating problems. Will wait to see how that develops, and what else comes on the market.

7D on a steadicam? I wouldn't want shallow DOF for that type of shooting, cos not possible to control focus while flying. I think the 7D is best for the "beauty" shots, where you want the nicest image possible.
 

giantcanopy

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Feb 11, 2007
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I have read some people retrofitting cine lenses onto the 7D ( while getting the mirror out of the way ) And because the less pricey cine lenses can cover the crop sensor better.
A fast wide prime lens from zeiss for a larger 35mm format will cost .... an MF digital back

Ryan
 

doom102938

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Aug 30, 2008
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Well, since your going purely for video and is just starting out, I think that the 7D would be a better choice mainly because of its frame rates.

Both camera are wonderful but shooting on the 7d might just save you sometime because you do not have to convert from 30p to 25p or 24p. Buying the 7D would also allow you to allocate more money for the lenses, external lcd, camera support and filters.

Yes lol cinema lenses are supremely expensive and they only cover up to 1.4 crop. They have amazing apertures too. Zeiss produces a 14mm F/1.2 prime to a 180mm F/1.2. Angenieux produces a 24-290mm F/2.5 that weighs 11kg:S. These lenses cost way over 30k USD each.

For most of us, the L primes and zooms would be sufficient.
 

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