Can winners be manufactured?


Kit

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#1
This rather interesting thread surfaced.
http://www.clubsnap.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1435507&p=8942326#post8942326

To me, it raised a couple of questions which I thought are worth pondering over. I believed(and still do) that people started taking photos out of interest. Winning competitions is only a "by-product" along the way. My question would be, why is there a need to be taught how to win competitions? What's there to be taught anyway?
 

tomcat

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#2
Does this mean that the person who is teaching this has knowledge of a tried and tested way of winning the Canon Photomarathon by virtue of him having actually won this Contest or know of people who have used similar method to win this Contest many times? :think:
 

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CamInit

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#3
Interesting. Kinda of reminds me of training to ace exams, without needing to put in as much effort compared to those without. Is it leaning towards general tips and guidelines or giving model answers to questions? Sounds like the latter. :think:
 

edutilos-

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#4
Kit,

You've been in photography for a while now, I'm sure you know at least a few photographers who focus on winning competitions.... And some who constantly do relatively well in competitions as well. That's also their choice.. No comments on whether that can be taught, but I agree with your philosophy that one shouldn't take photos with the sole purpose of winning accolades, but be truer to one's self. Of course, if you are doing it as a profession as compared to a hobby, then your priorities may be different. Whatever floats their boat, right? :)
 

zaren

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#5
My take is that photography competitions make photography more fun and challenging. Of course it's nice to win, but in reality it is not easy to win a competition. Even past winners of the canon photomarathon do not win subsequent editions of the competition. From my personal experience of taking part in several photomarathons, the biggest challenges are time and creativity, mixed with luck and skill. Many of the winning or shortlisted entries feature the photographer himself/herself or a friend/prop for the day, to ensure a ready model for each contest theme. The alternative, which is slightly harder, is to look for the winning scene and model out on the streets which needs more time and a bit of luck. Photo competitions also help to hone photography skills and make one a better photographer, isn't that what everyone who takes up photography as a hobby want? It's also nice to meet other photographers, and to see good photography from fellow photographers to inspire us to greater photographic heights. Make no mistake, some of the best photographers , both pro and amateur, will be out there at the next photomarathon, and it will be fun and challenging going up against them to try and win a prize, or to get a photo shortlisted. Either way, the lens is round, it ain't over till the last theme is announced, and everyone, even someone who has started out in photography recently, has a chance of winning. To me, that is what photography is about, making the best pictures we can, making new friends, and having fun while you are at it. At the very least, the photomarathon will teach you a vital lesson in time management which you can use in other spheres of your life :)
 

nitewalk

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#7
Haha maybe i should get him to analyse my handwriting.

But jokes aside, while it can be taught to people what to focus on for a competition, in the end it is still up to an individual. Not everyone can be a winner. Takes luck and skill i guess.
 

Kit

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#8
Does this mean that the person who is teaching this has knowledge of a tried and tested way of winning the Canon Photomarathon by virtue of him having actually won this Contest or know of people who have used similar method to win this Contest many times? :think:
Want to turn up and find out? :)
 

Kit

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#9
Interesting. Kinda of reminds me of training to ace exams, without needing to put in as much effort compared to those without. Is it leaning towards general tips and guidelines or giving model answers to questions? Sounds like the latter. :think:
HDRs and fisheyes are a killer combination! :bsmilie::bsmilie::bsmilie:
 

Kit

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#10
Kit,

You've been in photography for a while now, I'm sure you know at least a few photographers who focus on winning competitions.... And some who constantly do relatively well in competitions as well. That's also their choice.. No comments on whether that can be taught, but I agree with your philosophy that one shouldn't take photos with the sole purpose of winning accolades, but be truer to one's self. Of course, if you are doing it as a profession as compared to a hobby, then your priorities may be different. Whatever floats their boat, right? :)
I think I know of only one or so who was constantly winning competitions. I hardly follow local stuff these days though.
 

Kit

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#11
My take is that photography competitions make photography more fun and challenging. Of course it's nice to win, but in reality it is not easy to win a competition. Even past winners of the canon photomarathon do not win subsequent editions of the competition. From my personal experience of taking part in several photomarathons, the biggest challenges are time and creativity, mixed with luck and skill. Many of the winning or shortlisted entries feature the photographer himself/herself or a friend/prop for the day, to ensure a ready model for each contest theme. The alternative, which is slightly harder, is to look for the winning scene and model out on the streets which needs more time and a bit of luck. Photo competitions also help to hone photography skills and make one a better photographer, isn't that what everyone who takes up photography as a hobby want? It's also nice to meet other photographers, and to see good photography from fellow photographers to inspire us to greater photographic heights. Make no mistake, some of the best photographers , both pro and amateur, will be out there at the next photomarathon, and it will be fun and challenging going up against them to try and win a prize, or to get a photo shortlisted. Either way, the lens is round, it ain't over till the last theme is announced, and everyone, even someone who has started out in photography recently, has a chance of winning. To me, that is what photography is about, making the best pictures we can, making new friends, and having fun while you are at it. At the very least, the photomarathon will teach you a vital lesson in time management which you can use in other spheres of your life :)
I think that's my problem with the Photomarathon. Its like an epitome of adrenalin pumping instant gratification. Many times, I see delibrate(staged) photographs which comply with the themes literally and that gets multiplied in folds. Oh well.....
 

daredevil123

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#13
Haha maybe i should get him to analyse my handwriting.

But jokes aside, while it can be taught to people what to focus on for a competition, in the end it is still up to an individual. Not everyone can be a winner. Takes luck and skill i guess.
It is an art... not much about luck..
 

Blur Shadow

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#14
it's kinda like getting a coach, isn't it?

For example, we may be going around playing neighborhood soccer or basketball, and we may develop some individual skills that way, but a coach will help refine your techniques, help with development of tactics and strategies, such as finding the best spot to deploy you, or to decide on tactics to overcome the competition?

Same thing with photography. We may develop some skills along the way, but maybe a guide or mentor will help you unlock a new side of things, develop new insights?
 

lewissac

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Sep 20, 2011
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#16
I've joined the Photomarathon the the past three years and this year Im going to join too, but only for the sake of t-shirt and a 8R print LOL.

Nevertheless I quite admire those young photographers' creativity to come up with those art in a very short amount of time. Not so good for landscape enthusiast I believe :-|
 

Bukitimah

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Nov 28, 2010
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#18
Photography should rightfully an interest or hobby but for those doing as a career, wining trophies maybe important to ply their trade.

Nothing wrong with competition but sometimes the 'winner' can be very subjective. It is not like running where it is clear who came in first.

$ can create winners for sure. So do take wining with a pinch of salt and not too serious. There are more winners among the looser out there. Haha
 

lewissac

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Sep 20, 2011
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#19
In a conclusion, Don't take the competition too serious.
 

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