Camera display calibrated?


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tanzl

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May 20, 2009
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#1
I tried to calibrate my monitor to the camera display as close as possible.
But, are all the camera displays calibrated at the first place?
They should be right? If not my is the point we all using the display.
Thanks
 

Jed

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#2
If you mean camera LCDs, then no they are not calibrated.
 

night86mare

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#3
why you use the display? as a very rough gauge.

i don't trust anything i see there, just the histogram, that one sure no problem.
 

chalib

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#4
I tried to calibrate my monitor to the camera display as close as possible.
Your monitor will not be calibrated correctly if you do in this way

Camera LCD is just to check composition and histogram (for exposure). Only rough gauge
 

catchlights

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#5
there is no device, or no way to make the camera monitor display calibrated.

the camera monitor display is for us to see the composition, framing or expression, and also gauge exposure and colors, for exposure, learning to see histogram is more accurate, other than than, is all by experience to know how close you get from the final images recorded.
 

tanzl

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#6
Thanks for the replies. :)

Because my pictures turn out to be very differently from what I see on my monitor and my camera's LCD. I am using a laptop (not a Mac), so the quality of the monitor might not be that good. I have checked everything I could such as color space chosen, gamma setting......
I could not afford an external monitor now so I thought what I could do now is to make my monitor as close as possible to my camera's LCD. :bsmilie:
 

Clown

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#7
the preview you see on your camera LCD is actually a jpeg which is processed within the camera so if you're shooting raw, it will look different.
my take is that you'll need to do a monitor calibration even if your panel is not the best.
 

tanzl

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May 20, 2009
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#8
Thanks for sharing :)
Yea. It is kinda hard for me to buy a calibration gadget. I rather get a dry cabinet.
Tried the adobe gamma thing before, but it turned out to be worse.

I was comparing jpeg to jpeg actually. But then skin tone appeared to be grey and I also find out that no matter how I calibrate, I could not get the highlight as bright or white as those I see on the camera display. Even white paper picture showing a peak on the right hand side of histrogram appeared to be a bit greyish. But the shadow is still acceptable.
 

catchlights

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#9
Thanks for sharing :)
Yea. It is kinda hard for me to buy a calibration gadget. I rather get a dry cabinet.
Tried the adobe gamma thing before, but it turned out to be worse.

I was comparing jpeg to jpeg actually. But then skin tone appeared to be grey and I also find out that no matter how I calibrate, I could not get the highlight as bright or white as those I see on the camera display. Even white paper picture showing a peak on the right hand side of histrogram appeared to be a bit greyish. But the shadow is still acceptable.
just imagine a calibrated monitor as a rule or a weighing scale

if a rule is not straight and accurate, will you want to use it on a technical drawing need precision?

will you use a weighing scale in a lab which not sure is it accurate?
 

tanzl

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May 20, 2009
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#10
Hmm...... U got a point.
I cant afford one. Maybe I will just try to find where I can borrow one. :bsmilie:
 

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