Calibration of monitor?


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bokeh1.8

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Jul 6, 2006
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#1
Hi.. I would like to know more about monitor calibration and how does it work, why is it so improtant to get WYSIWYG (what you see is what you get) when you are photoshopp-ing :bsmilie: Thanks in advance!
 

deadpixel

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#2
Hi.. I would like to know more about monitor calibration and how does it work, why is it so improtant to get WYSIWYG (what you see is what you get) when you are photoshopp-ing :bsmilie: Thanks in advance!
It's important so that...

  1. When you print a photo at home, what comes out is what you have on screen
  2. When you print a photo at a lab, you don't get a rude shock
  3. When you publish you photos on the net, you don't get people asking you why your colors are off
  4. When you view your photos on another computer, you don't faint

As to how you go about it, there are two ways...

The manual way, using a printout from a calibrating sheet to adjust the brightness, hue and saturation of your screen or

The automatic way, using a monitor (and, for more accuracy, a printer) calibrator.

_
 

bokeh1.8

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It's important so that...

  1. When you print a photo at home, what comes out is what you have on screen
  2. When you print a photo at a lab, you don't get a rude shock
  3. When you publish you photos on the net, you don't get people asking you why your colors are off
  4. When you view your photos on another computer, you don't faint

As to how you go about it, there are two ways...

The manual way, using a printout from a calibrating sheet to adjust the brightness, hue and saturation of your screen or

The automatic way, using a monitor (and, for more accuracy, a printer) calibrator.

_
Thanks for your reply! I appreciate it!

Then.. how do I get the printout from a calibrating sheet then?? btw, I am printing from MLCC de.. :D This is my situation now.. I took some pics of my friend.. Then I went to Photoshop it, later and printed it.. the colours tured quite dull leh.. looks worse then the screen.. haiz..

I have tried to calibrate the screen using Adobe Gamma, but I dunno what does it mean by the ICC profiles and stuff like that.. I am turning confused.. Can anyone help me?? Thanks alot!
 

Wai

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Jan 17, 2002
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#4
It's important so that...

  1. When you print a photo at home, what comes out is what you have on screen
  2. When you print a photo at a lab, you don't get a rude shock
  3. When you publish you photos on the net, you don't get people asking you why your colors are off
  4. When you view your photos on another computer, you don't faint
erm, IMO, monitor calibration will not help in any of the above

1. what you print may not match your monitor unless you calibrate your printer with the paper you are going to use. It is time consuming and tedious and the tool + software alone will cost you 1 to 10K.

2. again, even if you have calibrated your monitor, it may not match the prints from lab, you will probably need to compensate accordingly thru trail and error, in order to get the color u want. In the end, what you see on the monitor still may not match the print.

3. most pple (esp for non-photographer) will not bother to calibrate their screen, so if their monitor calibration is off or use different color temperature, what they see will be totally different.

4. again, unless you calibrate every monitor that you use, the color will not match. Somemore the graphic card and monitor should be the same, in order to get the same effect. No way you can calibrate an old 14" CRT + onboard VGA and expect the color to match with an Apple/Eizo screen + matrox VGA card.
 

Wai

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#5
IMO, monitor calibration is important

1. so that i can still get back consistent output even when the screen deteroiate and color shifted over time

2. so that if someone say my color is off, I can confidently tell them that my screen has calibrated, and it is probably their screen calibration is off.

3. I have both printer and monitor calibration tool, and i create individual profile for different paper that I use, I can now achieve what-i-see-is-what-i-get
 

deadpixel

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Apr 14, 2004
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#6
erm, IMO, monitor calibration will not help in any of the above

1. what you print may not match your monitor unless you calibrate your printer with the paper you are going to use. It is time consuming and tedious and the tool + software alone will cost you 1 to 10K.

2. again, even if you have calibrated your monitor, it may not match the prints from lab, you will probably need to compensate accordingly thru trail and error, in order to get the color u want. In the end, what you see on the monitor still may not match the print.

3. most pple (esp for non-photographer) will not bother to calibrate their screen, so if their monitor calibration is off or use different color temperature, what they see will be totally different.

4. again, unless you calibrate every monitor that you use, the color will not match. Somemore the graphic card and monitor should be the same, in order to get the same effect. No way you can calibrate an old 14" CRT + onboard VGA and expect the color to match with an Apple/Eizo screen + matrox VGA card.
Oops...I forgot :embrass: my Spyder 2 Suite has a printer calibration tool... :bsmilie:

Still, the basic Spyder 2 calibrator software will load several printer profiles that will work with many Epson and a couple of HP printers. They aren't 100% on the money but still quite impressive.

_
 

Moonstone

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Sep 25, 2004
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#7
Spyder 2 suite :thumbsup: Just bought it at CP last week cost S$333 with free gift of the Kinetronics cleaner and panther lens cloth (worth S$38) :)
 

bokeh1.8

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Jul 6, 2006
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#8
Thanks for ur help! But I have neither.. so, what can I do?? y the way, I heard somewhere form CS that you could get accurate results from ur photo lab if u get a calibrating sheet from the printer and calibrate your monitor according to it.. how do I go about doing it?? Can I use Adobe Gamma to do that?? and how do I get the printout from a calibrating sheet?? Sorry, I'm a newbie, so.. :bsmilie:
 

Moonstone

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Sep 25, 2004
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#9
Using Adobe Gamma on LCD very difficult, almost impossible. Use it on CRT okay.

That's why I gave up using the Adobe Gamma. I had tried using it to calibrate my notebook and desktop LCD screen until I almost gone crazy:confused: So now with the spyder no problem :thumbsup:
 

bokeh1.8

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Jul 6, 2006
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#10
Hi, I am a supporter of MLCC, so I would like to calibrate my screen to his printer. He requested for my screen to be calibrated. I have the following questions:

  1. How can I do it without using the SPYDER? or any colourimeter.. And when he said about profiie, what does it mean
  • how can I use it on my pictures so that the screen looks like the print-out? T[

sorry for my ignorance.. I am just a newbie :)

Regards,
bokeh1.8
 

jopel

Senior Member
Dec 21, 2004
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#11
it is difficult to use eyeballing method.

calibrating the monitor is just half the job to get the colour 90% right.

you also requires the printer profiles.
unless you are using a reasonale good inkjet printer and softwares like Photoshop you do not need any printer profiles.

MLCC and other labs, even commercial press do not provide profile to end user. some don't even have profile to start with.

if you need custom printer profile you can look up for yanyewkay a fellow cs that provides such services.
 

jopel

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Dec 21, 2004
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#13
to create a monitor profile is generally known as calibrate - using hardwares and softwares.
 

Zerstorer

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Jul 8, 2002
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jopel

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Dec 21, 2004
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#15
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