Bokeh Pic


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Dec 16, 2009
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#1
Hi...
can anyone teach me how to take a bokeh pic?

i'm still beginner...sorry that i ask the stupid question here..:)
 

thenomad

New Member
Nov 17, 2008
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#2
Hi...
can anyone teach me how to take a bokeh pic?

i'm still beginner...sorry that i ask the stupid question here..:)
hi, you just need to use a large aperture, e.g. f/2.8, f/4, and focus on the subject in front of you. for more bokeh effect, focus closer to the subject, and make sure the background is further away from the subject

the greater the aperture, the greater the bokeh effect also. a f/2.8 is a larger aperture than a f/4, which is a larger aperture than a f/5.6
 

Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
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#3
There is no such thing as a "bokeh pic".

I suggest doing some research. Google this exact sentence:

"How to blur the background in photos DOF bokeh"
 

grantyale

Senior Member
Oct 4, 2004
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Bedok
#4
Hi...
can anyone teach me how to take a bokeh pic?

i'm still beginner...sorry that i ask the stupid question here..:)
Lock focus at your palm, point the camera at a Xmas tree, and you get a bokeh pic.
 

woeilee

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Aug 26, 2008
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woeilee.zenfolio.com
#7
Hi...
can anyone teach me how to take a bokeh pic?

i'm still beginner...sorry that i ask the stupid question here..:)
No sure what you are asking, but I would interpret your question as "How to take picture with bokeh filter?"

Try Google 'bokeh filter', or you may try these website for rough ideas:
1) www.thebokehfilter.com
2) http://www.diyphotography.net/
 

Jul 29, 2009
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#9
To get that creamy OOF, it's a function with 3 variables:

aperture size, camera-to-subject distance and subject-to-background distance.

in equation form: Bokeh number=D2/(D1*x)

where x is the aperture number(f/x),
D1 is camera-to-subject distance
and D2 is subject-to-background distance.


The bigger the bokeh number the more creamy the bokeh.


PS: Bokeh is an inexact science. But the equation is kind of neat.
 

tiger74

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Dec 21, 2009
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Little India
#10
I'm also newbie. My lens is 17-50mm F/2.8 Tamron.
Is it true that I need a more zoom lens to produce a dramatic bokeh effect? Like a 200mm lens? :sweat:
 

3in1c

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Oct 23, 2008
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#11
I'm also newbie. My lens is 17-50mm F/2.8 Tamron.
Is it true that I need a more zoom lens to produce a dramatic bokeh effect? Like a 200mm lens? :sweat:
You are mixing up focal length with subject and lens distance. Use your 17-50, at AV 2.8, 50mm. Simply take a shot at minimum distance, and compare a shot taken 3 steps away.
 

Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
19,105
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#12
I'm also newbie. My lens is 17-50mm F/2.8 Tamron.
Is it true that I need a more zoom lens to produce a dramatic bokeh effect? Like a 200mm lens? :sweat:
No. If you're asking that, it means you haven't really used your lens that much yet.
 

Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
19,105
12
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#15
Please learn how to properly link images. We have a newbies guide on that for a reason. Read it please.

Did you read the link mimik07 posted? Or read up a bit on what bokeh actually is?

Dof is the depth of field. In other words, it's how "deep" the sharp part of the picture is. The rest is blurred. Bokeh is the quality of that OOf area, how pleasing/distracting it is.
 

Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
19,105
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#16
In both the images you can see the bokeh characteristics of the lens.
 

tiger74

New Member
Dec 21, 2009
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Little India
#17
Btw.. just want to add more info.. about Depth of Field...
Got guidance from someone in IRC channel:

This is 50mm F2.8


This is 50mm F11 (notice the background compares to above photo)


:sweat:
 

mimik07

New Member
Oct 13, 2009
1,331
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East
#18
Btw.. just want to add more info.. about Depth of Field...
Got guidance from someone in IRC channel:

This is 50mm F2.8


This is 50mm F11 (notice the background compares to above photo)


:sweat:
Even your object at 50mm f/11 is blur too. Not a good comparison IMO.
 

yc2005

New Member
May 14, 2009
698
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#19
There are DOF calculators online, please google for them

Basically you can vary between focus distance, aperture and object distance, then it will show you the depth of focus range, out of focus range, etc.
 

Crappinni

New Member
Aug 31, 2007
179
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Singapore
#20
Biggest aperture (not in f number but diameter) and smallest focusing distance. By the way, N = f/D where N is f number, f is focal length and D is diameter of pupil (aperture size).

Choose somewhere nice to focus on or the shallow DOF will just be a hindrance. Here's an example:

Canon EF 50mm f/1.2L USM. Focus on eyes for animals (usually).

 

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