Blue tinge on snow environment?


Status
Not open for further replies.

Stefen

New Member
Apr 26, 2003
446
0
0
38
Beijing
www.stefenchow.com
#1
Do any of you have problems with this?

I recently went to Beijing and took so shots in the snow with Velvia 100, and most of the shots turn out slightly bluish. I took most of the shots either raw or with a circular polarizar.

I didn't have such a obvious problem with Kodak extra color 100 in Nepal snow scapes, nor did I have the problem with Provia 100 in Nepal and Tibet snow scapes.

This is the first time I am using Velvia, and though the grain is very fine, I am concerned with the bluish slides. I developed these slides at the Fuji lab.

Any comments ? I understand that there are no parallel comparisons, due to different lighting/climate, but as a general observation.

Thanks!! ;)
 

#2
Fuji films tend to be "cold". I am not familiar with Velvia 100/100F, but the blue problem is especially severe in the Provia line of films. You get blue cast on an overcast day, and more pronounced if you get underexposure. You can probably correct it via a 81B or 81C warming filter.

Kodak slides are warmer, so the problem is not so pronounced.

Regards
CK
 

Caspere

New Member
Jul 27, 2003
1,316
0
0
East Side
gallery.clubsnap.com
#3
It's there all the time, since the begining of the world...

Bluish because of the (big big) sky, the shadows however slight when out in the open is almost always bluish.. except yellow snow which may appear slightly green. :bsmilie:

That said, velvia is a daylight film, and without a skylight 1a color correction filter, your shoots out in the open snow will give "bluish" tones and shadows. UV filter also helps a bit to reduce the glare and bluish shadows.

I bet your negatives in the shot under the same conditions will yield bluishness. It is in there in the negatives. But, because you are looking at prints color corrected by the wonderful super duper machines at the labs. You do not usually see it..unless the operator did not turn on the "auto correction" function. Or new, or fell asleep....
 

Caspere

New Member
Jul 27, 2003
1,316
0
0
East Side
gallery.clubsnap.com
#6
Stefen said:
hmmm...these are slides.. not negatives.
will the lab have a big impact on the end colors on my slides?
Oops..blooper. my big mouth. sorry. i missed the provia part.

my observation is similar to ckiang above. kodak generally tends to be warmer, and velvia 100 that I used tends to be a bit colder when compared to the velvia 50.
 

Stefen

New Member
Apr 26, 2003
446
0
0
38
Beijing
www.stefenchow.com
#8
In that case, what will be a suitable film to use on snow conditions?

I have since used :

Provia 100
Astia 100
Velvia 100
Kodak Extra color 100

Any comments on the VS, GX series of kodak?
 

showtime

New Member
May 2, 2003
984
0
0
39
Singapore
Visit site
#9
Stefen said:
hmmm...these are slides.. not negatives.
will the lab have a big impact on the end colors on my slides?
\

what he meant is film...
many tend to use the wrong terms and use the word negative in place of film.. film can be negative or positive(color reversal/slide)...

anyway, check the film specs for the exact color temperature it is balanced for... subtle difference in this value will render the film cooler or warmer... remember also that the higher altitude you are, the cooler the color temperature will be in the atmosphere...
 

eyes

New Member
Nov 15, 2003
469
0
0
Australia
www.aljazeera.net
#10
One of the more obvious reason why your photo is blue is because it's a barren snow land. All that white and reflective snow bounces the atmospheric UV light all over the place, when this concentration is suffice, you get this blue color cast.

Polarising filter only controls the stray lights in the environment but as in your case you'll need a UV filter on top of that. And if it is still very bad, perhaps a colour correction filter helps.
 

Stefen

New Member
Apr 26, 2003
446
0
0
38
Beijing
www.stefenchow.com
#11
yup.. i do realise all these limitations now, but it is really hard to tell where i was then.

oh well, there's nothing i can really do now except to learn from this mistake.

:(
 

eyes

New Member
Nov 15, 2003
469
0
0
Australia
www.aljazeera.net
#12
Stefen said:
yup.. i do realise all these limitations now, but it is really hard to tell where i was then.

oh well, there's nothing i can really do now except to learn from this mistake.

:(

It's okay my friend. Just pause a while before you hit the shutter the next time. I myself have a good share of technical foul-ups.
 

Diablo

New Member
Feb 14, 2002
209
0
0
43
Visit site
#13
I tried E100VS against Provia100.

While the Fuji have punchier colours, I find the kodak haveing more acurate shades of grey
 

Status
Not open for further replies.
Top Bottom