blackground blurring


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bugsz

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Aug 14, 2006
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#1
can anyone teach me how to blur the background while having object focused?
am i able to do it with my kit lens 18-55 IS or 70-200 L4
 

Mar 15, 2007
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Singapore
#2
usually we will set the camera to its lowest aperture value (completely open)
 

darkness

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Aug 11, 2002
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#4
can anyone teach me how to blur the background while having object focused?
am i able to do it with my kit lens 18-55 IS or 70-200 L4
The "blurness" of the background is dependent on the subject distance, the background distance and aperture size. The closer your subject is relative to the background and the larger your aperture (note: larger aperture = smaller f number) is, the more blur ur background will be.

Assuming that
| = background
x = subject
c = camera

|_____x________c = less blur
|_________x____c = more blur

Also, try opening your aperture to the max (smallest f number) that your lens can support (for 18-55 kit lens, that would be f/3.5 at the 18mm end and f/5.6 at the 55mm end).

Lastly, the kit lens unfortunately is unable to "blur" off much of the background (given the relatively small aperture compared to, say, a f/2 lens). Your best bet would be to keep ur subject as close to you as possible with a far off background. If that cannot be done, you will need a faster (smaller f number) lens, such as the cheap and excellent 50mm f/1.8.
 

Deming86

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Mar 27, 2008
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SengKang
#6
1. Go as close to the subject as possible
2. Widest Aperture you can get (smallest Aperture Value)
3. Longest end of your zoom (70-200 => use the 200 end)

To get max bokeh possible. its a combination so give and take =]
 

giantcanopy

Senior Member
Feb 11, 2007
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SG
#7
the term we use is call bokeh... try to read more on DOF to get that effect.
Bokeh is a qualitative term to describe the blurring / oof, and it is can good or bad. From the starting thread do not think bugsz is talking about the quality of the blur here, but rather have more or less of the oof areas.

Ryan
 

Deming86

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Mar 27, 2008
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SengKang
#8
btw you might wanna manually select the AF point to pinpoint where you want the focus to be. cheers!
 

pro_FHM

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Nov 3, 2005
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#9
Although the lens is important, do make use of other factors as mentioned to assist u achieve what u want. :)
 

tjhan

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Feb 11, 2007
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#10
1. Go as close to the subject as possible
2. Widest Aperture you can get (smallest Aperture Value)
3. Longest end of your zoom (70-200 => use the 200 end)

To get max bokeh possible. its a combination so give and take =]
And 4, get the background as far as possible from your subject.
 

giantcanopy

Senior Member
Feb 11, 2007
6,232
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SG
#12
not neccessary, should be object as near to the lens as possible, bg need not be very far.
Whether you want the object say a person as near the lens as possible will depend on the composition that you are trying to achieve.
 

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