black and white pics


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denn23

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Dec 22, 2003
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#1
i tried to search in this forum for a thread but couldnt find any so..

anyways.. how do you guys take black and white pics?

cause usually, ill just take a normal shot.. and PP it to black and white.

U guys do the same too?
 

catchlights

Moderator
Staff member
Sep 27, 2004
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www.foto-u.com
#2
in digital, that should be the way,

you can have b&w images from color images very easy, and with lots of control

but not the other way round.
 

felixcat8888

Senior Member
May 8, 2005
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#3
i tried to search in this forum for a thread but couldnt find any so..

anyways.. how do you guys take black and white pics?

cause usually, ill just take a normal shot.. and PP it to black and white.

U guys do the same too?
Use natural Black and White Film? Try it.:D

No need to PP...
 

night86mare

Deregistered
Aug 25, 2006
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www.pbase.com
#6
i tried to search in this forum for a thread but couldnt find any so..

anyways.. how do you guys take black and white pics?

cause usually, ill just take a normal shot.. and PP it to black and white.

U guys do the same too?
of course, use color shot to convert to bnw, using the preset bnw mode tends to give control away.. with your own conversion you get to manipulate the tonality.. what you want to stand out.. :)
 

Sep 24, 2008
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#7
If you have the budget, try Silver Efex Pro. ;p

The ultimate digital B&W control.
 

creampuff

Senior Member
Jul 11, 2006
5,116
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Dover
#8
If you have the budget, try Silver Efex Pro. ;p

The ultimate digital B&W control.
Tried it and yes it's good time saver if you don't want to fiddle around and experiment, but almost everything it can do can also be done on Photoshop CS4, Camera RAW 5.0 or Lightroom 2 pretty much free. I do think if your workflow needs to generate plenty of B&W quickly, like wedding/portrait shooters, it is an invaluable tool.

With regards to B&W, whether digital or film, getting the exposure you want right is an important first step. I find digital conversion offers much more precise, repeatable and consistent results, and it doesn't really matter if one shoots RAW or high quality jpeg. Obviously RAW is preferred for the greater colour depth and slightly higher dynamic range.

With film, to get the nice exhibition quality images with excellent tonality and grain, one needs to master the 3 areas of exposure, developing and printing. Merely shooting B&W film and sending them to a lab for developing and printing is pretty much a game of chance.
Obviously a well printed B&W image will almost always outdo the inkjet print but in the bigger scheme of things, you'll likely get quicker keepers with the digital monochrome approach.
 

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