Best lens for Studio shoot?


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Jun 21, 2009
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#2
too many factors go into such a decision that no one can possibly give you an objectively correct response.

take for instance, if your range of movement is very limited, a wide angle lens might be your only option. additionally, there is also the issue of bokeh and subject isolation, where some lenses are renowned and prized over others for their superior bokeh qualities. on the topic of zoom, do you want to move in and out with your feet, or with the twist of a ring?

i won't go so far as to make a claim of which lens is the best for a studio shoot, but here are some lenses that i'd regard as worthy of consideration.

70-200mm f/2.8 (wide usable focal length range, fast, nice bokeh)
85mm f/1.4 (good focal length for portraits, very fast, renowned creamy bokeh quality)
50mm f/1.8 (seriously, why not? it's cheap, it's fast, it's good)

hope this helps. ;)
 

Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
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#3
too many factors go into such a decision that no one can possibly give you an objectively correct response.

take for instance, if your range of movement is very limited, a wide angle lens might be your only option. additionally, there is also the issue of bokeh and subject isolation, where some lenses are renowned and prized over others for their superior bokeh qualities. on the topic of zoom, do you want to move in and out with your feet, or with the twist of a ring?

i won't go so far as to make a claim of which lens is the best for a studio shoot, but here are some lenses that i'd regard as worthy of consideration.

70-200mm f/2.8 (wide usable focal length range, fast, nice bokeh)
85mm f/1.4 (good focal length for portraits, very fast, renowned creamy bokeh quality)
50mm f/1.8 (seriously, why not? it's cheap, it's fast, it's good)

hope this helps. ;)

Bokeh, in a studio setting, is pointless. Due to studio lights you're normall shooting at f/8 anyway.

Even your kit lens will look very sharp at f/8
 

Edwin Francis

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Mar 24, 2006
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#4
Studio shoot of what? Head & shoulder portraits? Full-length shots? Group portraits? Products shots? You need to be more specific. Just about any lens you use outdoors can be used in the studio, though extreme wides and teles are normally less useful. My main consideration would be field of view at a comfortable shooting distance.
Assuming you're shooting people, I'd say 28-35mm for small groups, 50mm for full-length solo shots, and 85-135 for head & shoulder shots. These are all referenced to full-frame 35mm cameras, adjust accordingly for crop frames. All assuming a small to moderate size studio (9" background), and a shooting distance of 3-4m. Most humble standard zooms and kit lenses would cover the required range.
 

Jun 21, 2009
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#5
Bokeh, in a studio setting, is pointless. Due to studio lights you're normall shooting at f/8 anyway.

Even your kit lens will look very sharp at f/8
bro rashkae, now that you mentioned it, i must admit that i probably did not answer his question properly. i was under the impression that he was asking about portraiture, but now that i've re-read his question, he could be shooting anything (product shots, etc) as long as it's in a studio setting. :)

sweetfeetjaded, i think you really have to be more specific in what you intend to shoot if you desire a more accurate response.
 

Dec 10, 2008
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Pasir Ris
#6
bro rashkae, now that you mentioned it, i must admit that i probably did not answer his question properly. i was under the impression that he was asking about portraiture, but now that i've re-read his question, he could be shooting anything (product shots, etc) as long as it's in a studio setting.
Even for portraiture, it is likely that you'll have to use a smaller aperture to accommodate for the strobes as Rashkae said. When you have a plain single colour background, bokeh is quite irrelevant.
 

V

vince123123

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#7
I feel the 28-70 or 24-70 is the best lens for studio; especially the not - too - big ones. Big studios you can go ahead with your 85s and 105s.

70-200 is a bad lens; why do you want to hold something so heavy in a controlled enviroment?
 

liarliar

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May 13, 2007
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#8
Lightings and other photography equipment are equally important in a studio indoor environment. Its a location where you can tweak and adjust lightings to your desired results or close. Lens just laid whatever you have aside ready for use. There's no specific answers.

Can search the net with all the tips provided in this thread by other members to see which one fits you, your style, your budget, and your subjects or type of business.
 

catchlights

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Sep 27, 2004
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#9
I feel the 28-70 or 24-70 is the best lens for studio; especially the not - too - big ones. Big studios you can go ahead with your 85s and 105s.

70-200 is a bad lens; why do you want to hold something so heavy in a controlled enviroment?
70-200? not really, depends on what are you shooting and the size of studio.
 

catchlights

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#10
Wondering what is the best lens for studio shoot?

Its for Nikon camera and preferably nikon lens.
your question are too general, many things can shoot inside a studio, from car to washing machine to industrial product to people to jewelry, all need different types of lenses, there is no ONE lens fix all.

want to start right away? use your kit lens come with your camera.
you want a cheap and good lens to start? try Nikon 50mm f1.8.
 

zac08

Senior Member
Feb 21, 2005
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#11
Uncle catchlights has mentioned all the necessary issues.

Size of studio and what you want to shoot comes to mind. Any lens can be used, provided you know what you want to achieve with it.
 

Jan 29, 2008
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#12
your question are too general, many things can shoot inside a studio, from car to washing machine to industrial product to people to jewelry, all need different types of lenses, there is no ONE lens fix all.

want to start right away? use your kit lens come with your camera.
you want a cheap and good lens to start? try Nikon 50mm f1.8.
this pretty much answers it all...:thumbsup:
 

#13
sorry guys, i should have been more specific.

My studio is has a very limited space. Normally i would shoot a full body and also half of the body. Would rather like to turn the lens ring rather than space myself out with my models as i dont really have space to compromise.
 

V

vince123123

Guest
#14
Then I recommend the Nikon 24-70/28-70 once again.

sorry guys, i should have been more specific.

My studio is has a very limited space. Normally i would shoot a full body and also half of the body. Would rather like to turn the lens ring rather than space myself out with my models as i dont really have space to compromise.
 

Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
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#15
sorry guys, i should have been more specific.

My studio is has a very limited space. Normally i would shoot a full body and also half of the body. Would rather like to turn the lens ring rather than space myself out with my models as i dont really have space to compromise.
get a good 24-70 or 28-70, or just use your kit lens. At f/8 (normal studio apertures) you'll be hard pressed to notice a difference in resolution.
 

StrifeYun

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Nov 15, 2006
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#17
A zoom lens with little distortion :)
studio normally take like around f8-f11 ... unless ... outdoor studio !! :eek: :p
 

sabrecruz

New Member
Oct 20, 2007
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#18
Wondering what is the best lens for studio shoot?

Its for Nikon camera and preferably nikon lens.



I am a Canon 40D (and batt grip) user. My 17-85mm IS USM (don't forget the hood) serves me excellent pics with settings at 1/100, ISO 100, F10... the rest is adjusting the studio lights intensity according to what kind of effect you want to give but with a minimum of 1 softbox, 1 umbrella and 1 kicker...


Bokeh? For outdoor shoots. Why bokeh when using backdrops?

:)
 

artemisbow

New Member
Oct 5, 2005
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#19
Some people shoot at wide aperture in studio environment to get that shallow dof effect, eyes sharp ears blur. Speedlights are often used and ND too if the light is too strong. Others want the backdrop to be slightly oof to draw more attention to the subject and for this bokeh quality isnt that impt imo.

Dont forget to check how well the lens handle flare, esp with a very bright background if u're into shooting those styles.
 

bruggink

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Jul 2, 2008
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#20
During my studio shooting, my photographer used 70-200mm. He said "Nvm the weight. So long as the results are nice, it's good enough."

That sentence made sense to me..
 

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