Beginner to dslr


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fringster0

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Apr 14, 2011
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#1
I know this is a stupid question but I feel like asking. How to u guys know wat dslr to go for at the beginning be it Canon, Sony, Nikon....? Is it the kind of system, the lenses, interest, feeling....?
 

SkyStrike

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Nov 29, 2010
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#2
Reading the liner kinda makes me think you are about to ask "what dslr to buy"....I think the authors of the sticky threads in the Newbies Corner will appreciate that you give them a read :)

http://www.clubsnap.com/forums/threads/787393-FAQ-What-DSLR-camera-to-buy
http://www.clubsnap.com/forums/threads/797080-What-lens-etc-to-buy-AFTER-my-1st-DSLR

A short answer: Anything can be a factor for buying a DSLR system of any brand. From Branding -> Functions -> Lens specialization -> Ergonomics (the feeling when you hold the camera and user friendliness of menus) -> Price -> Color (yes, this is a factor for some) -> ANYTHING!
 

chiangkxv

Senior Member
Jul 5, 2008
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#3
First, I'll shortlist a few DSLR from different brand that fits my bill (specs, price)
Head down to shops to have a feel and choose the one that feels best in your hand. :D
 

Apr 26, 2010
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Telok Blangah
#4
See which brand's commercial is more appealing to you....
Just kidding.

Firstly, you have to "FEEL" which camera you like to hold. What type of OS you prefer.
Then, we talk about budget and range of lens, capablility, etc which is more or less about the same for all brands.

Some people choose some particular brand is because all his or her friends uses this particular brand and they can share lenses and accessories.
And some people is just smitten by the comercials and just go and buy that camera, which one of my friend just did not long ago...
 

Apr 14, 2011
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#5
Ha ha. I will take a look at those stickys. No but i do wonder nowadays more and more people going into dslr, is it jus the hype that they bought the dslr or wat. Wat make them go and buy in the first place?
 

kei1309

Senior Member
Apr 12, 2010
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#6
hard to tell. for me, i decided to upgrade from my PNS and film cameras.

also because i love to mess around with the settings and found PNS too limiting, and film too troublesome (although the results are fantastic)
 

ZerocoolAstra

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Mar 13, 2008
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#7
Ha ha. I will take a look at those stickys. No but i do wonder nowadays more and more people going into dslr, is it jus the hype that they bought the dslr or wat. Wat make them go and buy in the first place?
We can only guess what those reasons are.
The good thing is that the market is expanding and hopefully more competition for sales drives prices southward :)
 

Apr 14, 2011
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#8
Ha ha, true true. I still remember how it was so expensive when I bought my first digital Sony camera and its not even a dslr.
 

wootsk

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Aug 12, 2007
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#9
There are actually other system and some are very good and value for money as compare to the C,N and S DSLR system. I know that most people who start off will be influence by marketing and hip of holding the C and N system so much so that they turn blind on more suitable choice for them. Wonder how many people complained why adding a stabilizer in lens for this 2 big brand cost so much, yet they are still willing to pay the extra few hundred for the stabilizer.
 

bonrya

Senior Member
Dec 16, 2010
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#10
I also didn't know which Dslr to buy when I started.. Haha but somehow after joining a photo club and learning a little more about the various cameras I somehow made a choice several years later..

Don't think you'll be able to randomly join a club. But maybe you can start with a prosumer camera or pns to learn a little more about the settings etc?

This is what I did and not that you should follow la.. Hahaha.
 

Apr 14, 2011
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#11
I am still wondering if I should buy a dslr cos although I have the interest but I don't seem to have the time. And I wonder is it better to buy a beginner or mid-range model to learn if u don't intend to change the body until its beyond repair.
 

#12
last time my friends told me when I was trying to get my first, to get the best that I could get already, coz I'll upgrade eventually, and loss $$$, at that time D60 or D90, they keep on suggesting D90.
but I went on D60, then after three months, sell away D60 and get D90, they're are right eventually hehe

hope you make the right decision =)
 

luckyorange

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Jan 13, 2011
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#13
I am still wondering if I should buy a dslr cos although I have the interest but I don't seem to have the time. And I wonder is it better to buy a beginner or mid-range model to learn if u don't intend to change the body until its beyond repair.
Hahaha i rem i was like u the last time thinking if i should get a dslr anot. worried that i got no time to shoot this and that. but no fear! u still got your weekend right? plus ph, school holiday (if your student) haha. so after doing some research here and there i decide to go for dslr =D, yay! finally i bought myself my first dslr! which is model xxxx so i went around shooting with the dslr for a few month with my gf, haha was so fun to walk around and shoot in singapore (can relax relax after 5days of work), and wow! its fun walking around shooting haha. after that i feel bad because gf was like standing there and see only haha. so in the end i went to buy another body for her =x. and now woots! happy ending both of us walk around and shooting most of the wkend haha...

as for which range to buy its up to u and ur budget. but i think its good to go straight for mid range just in case u learn fast and needed a upgrade =x
 

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lcheowl

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Mar 21, 2011
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#14
I know this is a stupid question but I feel like asking. How to u guys know wat dslr to go for at the beginning be it Canon, Sony, Nikon....? Is it the kind of system, the lenses, interest, feeling....?
the best is to get from the 2nd hand market, play with it, sell off and try another brand or model, usually after 2 or 3 rounds, you should know what you want.

You may even make a profit if you manage to get at bottom rock price.

The lose just consider as rental fee lor, since it will be very much cheaper that you rental from the camera rental shop.
 

SkyStrike

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Nov 29, 2010
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#15
I am still wondering if I should buy a dslr cos although I have the interest but I don't seem to have the time. And I wonder is it better to buy a beginner or mid-range model to learn if u don't intend to change the body until its beyond repair.
Actually, I would also suggest what luckyorange said abt going straight to mid range (semi-pro), to reduce the cost of upgrading. But I guess one of your fear is losing interest fast. (Time is not an issue, the Weather is...).

Also, the range of cameras you will be looking at is also dependent on your shooting interests. For instance, If you are taking landscapes, many times you will be using low ISO (~100 - 400 max for me). When comparing image quality (ignoring the lens factor here) across the wide range of DSLRs, you won't be able to notice much visible difference.
 

#16
I am still wondering if I should buy a dslr cos although I have the interest but I don't seem to have the time. And I wonder is it better to buy a beginner or mid-range model to learn if u don't intend to change the body until its beyond repair.
Buying a DSLR means you are investing into a lens system - the body is only a small cost in the long term since lenses are more long term. So one way to choose is to decide by lens collection and prices.

The main benefit of buying a DSLR is the large sensor size (APS-C sized), which will produce better images in terms of better detail, better dynamic range and low noise. An entry level DSLR has an APS-C sensor. A semi-pro DSLR is most likely going to have an APS-C sensor too. Therefore there is no advantage in buying semi-pro over entry level, unless you want the additional convenience of features. The added cost is generally not a benefit to a learning shooter like yourself. The next jump in image quality will be going up to full-frame sized sensors - but these are quite expensive.

If you are a beginner, it is better to buy an advanced P&S camera to experiment and learn, and then buy a DSLR (or mirrorless) camera later.

After using my Fuji S6500FD (advanced P&S) camera for about 3 years, I learned a lot about photography and what to look for in an upgrade. My priorities were good image quality, low weight, small bulk, good ergonomics and low cost. This is why I eventually went with a mirrorless option (Samsung NX) - I personally think that DSLRs will fade away soon anyway.
 

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luckyorange

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Jan 13, 2011
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#17
Actually, I would also suggest what luckyorange said abt going straight to mid range (semi-pro), to reduce the cost of upgrading. But I guess one of your fear is losing interest fast. (Time is not an issue, the Weather is...).

Also, the range of cameras you will be looking at is also dependent on your shooting interests. For instance, If you are taking landscapes, many times you will be using low ISO (~100 - 400 max for me). When comparing image quality (ignoring the lens factor here) across the wide range of DSLRs, you won't be able to notice much visible difference.
OH YA WEATHER!!! is a problem also -.-! hate it when it started raining b4 im out of house haha! kills my mood! =(, yup when shooting landscapes for me also low iso haha
 

luckyorange

Senior Member
Jan 13, 2011
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#18
Buying a DSLR means you are investing into a lens system - the body is only a small cost in the long term since lenses are more long term. So one way to choose is to decide by lens collection and prices.

The main benefit of buying a DSLR is the large sensor size (APS-C sized), which will produce better images in terms of better detail, better dynamic range and low noise. An entry level DSLR has an APS-C sensor. A semi-pro DSLR is most likely going to have an APS-C sensor too. Therefore there is no advantage in buying semi-pro over entry level, unless you want the additional convenience of features. The added cost is generally not a benefit to a learning shooter like yourself. The next jump in image quality will be going up to full-frame sized sensors - but these are quite expensive.

If you are a beginner, it is better to buy an advanced P&S camera to experiment and learn, and then buy a DSLR (or mirrorless) camera later.

After using my Fuji S6500FD (advanced P&S) camera for about 3 years, I learned a lot about photography and what to look for in an upgrade. My priorities were good image quality, low weight, small bulk, good ergonomics and low cost. This is why I eventually went with a mirrorless option (Samsung NX) - I personally think that DSLRs will fade away soon anyway.
aw sad to know that
 

kei1309

Senior Member
Apr 12, 2010
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#19
Shahmatt said:
Buying a DSLR means you are investing into a lens system - the body is only a small cost in the long term since lenses are more long term. So one way to choose is to decide by lens collection and prices.

The main benefit of buying a DSLR is the large sensor size (APS-C sized), which will produce better images in terms of better detail, better dynamic range and low noise. An entry level DSLR has an APS-C sensor. A semi-pro DSLR is most likely going to have an APS-C sensor too. Therefore there is no advantage in buying semi-pro over entry level, unless you want the additional convenience of features. The added cost is generally not a benefit to a learning shooter like yourself. The next jump in image quality will be going up to full-frame sized sensors - but these are quite expensive.

If you are a beginner, it is better to buy an advanced P&S camera to experiment and learn, and then buy a DSLR (or mirrorless) camera later.

After using my Fuji S6500FD (advanced P&S) camera for about 3 years, I learned a lot about photography and what to look for in an upgrade. My priorities were good image quality, low weight, small bulk, good ergonomics and low cost. This is why I eventually went with a mirrorless option (Samsung NX) - I personally think that DSLRs will fade away soon anyway.
Yup. This is lens investment is pretty heavy.

But i don't think DSLRs will die out. When mirrorless cameras improve, DSLRs will improve as well. To give consumers the benefit of choice.
 

ZerocoolAstra

Senior Member
Mar 13, 2008
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#20
I don't think I will live long enough to see the day that DSLRs fade away :bsmilie:

Mirrorless cameras... hmmm, still nowhere near in my opinion.
 

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