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SLee

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Nov 5, 2005
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Hi all,
This is the first time I'm taking picture (seriously):embrass:
using my dad's film camera.



Please give any comments
The sun is rising from left rear side of me when taking this picture
Wish to hear something on the exposure. Is it under exposed around the right bottom region?
If yes, any way to solve this?
Having some difficulty aligning the horizon as well.:)
 

Heartshape

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Dec 11, 2005
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Hi Bro, this is quite a good attempt considering this is your first serious shot. Composition is not bad, and I see you have applied the rule of thirds. ha ha.
One thing to note is that detail is important. Though the boat is in darkness, a well exposed image will show detail upon close inspection. Here it looks like the boat's backside is in darkness.
Firstly, it looks like you metered off the wrong area. Looking at it, you probably metered off an area near the left where the sun was rising. This will make the bright area properly exposed but underexpose the shadows. I would have metered off the front of the boat, as this would allow the bright area to over expose and the dark area to underexpose while still maintaining detail in the boat. It is of course advisable to bracket in situations like this
Some people may use a graduated filter to make the shor more evenly lit. But you wouldn't want that cos that will steal away the depth of the shot and make it very flat.
 

SLee

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Nov 5, 2005
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Heartshape said:
Hi Bro, this is quite a good attempt considering this is your first serious shot. Composition is not bad, and I see you have applied the rule of thirds. ha ha.
One thing to note is that detail is important. Though the boat is in darkness, a well exposed image will show detail upon close inspection. Here it looks like the boat's backside is in darkness.
Firstly, it looks like you metered off the wrong area. Looking at it, you probably metered off an area near the left where the sun was rising. This will make the bright area properly exposed but underexpose the shadows. I would have metered off the front of the boat, as this would allow the bright area to over expose and the dark area to underexpose while still maintaining detail in the boat. It is of course advisable to bracket in situations like this
Some people may use a graduated filter to make the shor more evenly lit. But you wouldn't want that cos that will steal away the depth of the shot and make it very flat.
Thanks for ur advice, will look into that in future. Still learning as this is the first time I ever touch a SLR camera, having great difficulty to locate the manual as well.:bsmilie:

hopefulphoto said:
I really like this photograph considering it's your first actual shot you took. What kind of film camera did you use? It's a very nice photograph.
Thanks for ur comment. I'm using Canon EOS500 with Kit Lense.;p
 

foxtwo

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Mar 11, 2004
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You have a high subject brightness range (SBR) from the reflection/sky to the boat end. In such cases, there is no right or wrong metering. It all depends on the photographer's intentions.

1) correct exposure on boat but overexposure for reflection/sky OR
2) correct exposure on reflection/sky but underexposure for boat

You should understand there is nothing wrong with shadows and darkness. Without these things, pictures would look flat & 2D.

I feel the picture is well done overall. Nothing wrong exposure wise. Looks to me there is enough detail on the boat hull, though the quality of the photo is not very good- grainy, muted colours. There is nothing wrong with enhancing it through PS before posting, even lab prints from film undergo colour corrections unless specifically ordered by customer.

Only problem is the shadowy area at the extreme right, looks like vignet but could also be natural shadow, maybe a mountain behind you. Either way, a bit of it can be cropped away as well as a bit of the foreground too.

When you're shooting negatives, experiment bracket shooting to max +1 stop above correct. If slides, -1/3 stop below correct does the trick for me.

edit: most pictures would look flat & 2d
 

SLee

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Nov 5, 2005
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Thank you for ur comment.
foxtwo said:
You have a high subject brightness range (SBR) from the reflection/sky to the boat end.
Is it advisable avoid such scenario? Or is up to personal taste? :dunno:

Regarding the noise, will it be caused by the film that I'm using? Because I'm using a very old (almost expire) ISO200 film (carrefour brand).;p

Regarding the vignetting problem, it it if vignet occurs, it will occur exactly the same at every single picture taken at the same focal length? :)
 

foxtwo

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Mar 11, 2004
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SLee said:
Thank you for ur comment.

Is it advisable avoid such scenario? Or is up to personal taste? :dunno:

Regarding the noise, will it be caused by the film that I'm using? Because I'm using a very old (almost expire) ISO200 film (carrefour brand).;p

Regarding the vignetting problem, it it if vignet occurs, it will occur exactly the same at every single picture taken at the same focal length? :)
well, it's unavoidable when that's how mother nature gives it to us. I suppose if you're resourceful enough you could do some creative gradual neutral density right-left positioning. It's personal taste, personal compositional idea- if SBR is too great you could frame it differently.

grain-> film. noise-> digital. Yes, poor quality is usually inherent in almost expired (assuming not fridged), dubious branded films. As well as scanning & post-process matters.

I'm not versed in the technicals of vignet. I think your lense is producing a very slight vignet in the picture, but light falloff is also caused by size of aperture.
denniskee posted a link in his thread on vignetting.
 

espion

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I think its a good pic and I would have not do anything more or less to the pic.

Many valid points are mentioned, and the most important being what is it you are trying to say with this pic.

Most get carried away with technicalities and forgot about the picture.

The picture comes first, and foremost, everything else is secondary.

So for example if what impressed you at that moment was the pinks of the sky, then that is what you should be shooting for, and the darkness and shadows on the boat, and the lack of details thereof, unimportant.

However if it is the glint of the boat that caught your eye, then the metering and framing and so on must be orchestrated to evoke the same mood and feel as you felt then and there.

As it is your picture evokes a cosy calm quiet and peaceful sunrise with latent promise of very good and maybe loving day. And to be able to say that is very good for a picture.
 

SLee

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Nov 5, 2005
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espion said:
I think its a good pic and I would have not do anything more or less to the pic.

Many valid points are mentioned, and the most important being what is it you are trying to say with this pic.

Most get carried away with technicalities and forgot about the picture.

The picture comes first, and foremost, everything else is secondary.

So for example if what impressed you at that moment was the pinks of the sky, then that is what you should be shooting for, and the darkness and shadows on the boat, and the lack of details thereof, unimportant.

However if it is the glint of the boat that caught your eye, then the metering and framing and so on must be orchestrated to evoke the same mood and feel as you felt then and there.

As it is your picture evokes a cosy calm quiet and peaceful sunrise with latent promise of very good and maybe loving day. And to be able to say that is very good for a picture.
Noted ;p Fully agree with ur statement of "Picture comes first...Everything else is secondary"
Thank you for your comment. :heart:
 

solarii

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Oct 20, 2005
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A good shot. Instills a feeling of calm and serenity. Nothing wrong with your metering... a properly exposed sky with the boat as a silhouette is perfectly alright.

In your case the sky helps set the mood and atmosphere of the shot. Its hint of fuchsia adds to the drama and makes it attractive.

Blowing it out would trash the shot. People allow the sky to blow out only if they want to emphasize on the subject's details, and the sky is uninteresting and unimportant. In my opinion there's nothing special about the boat... it merely serves as foreground interest to anchor your shot. But it is an important element nonetheless, so don't exclude it just because its a silhouette.

Understanding what makes a shot work is important to knowing what to focus on. Your shot hinges on shape and colour. Intricate detail is secondary.

Well Done for a 1st attempt!
 

SLee

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Nov 5, 2005
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Hi Solarii,
Thanks for your comment.
:think: There is lots of things to explore in photography.
 

nemesis32

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i am surprised that no one mentioned about the slanted horizon.... SLee, for pics with water, horizon is the key... it must not be slanted.

Overall very good attempt. Cheers and carry on shooting!
 

SLee

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Nov 5, 2005
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nemesis32 said:
i am surprised that no one mentioned about the slanted horizon.... SLee, for pics with water, horizon is the key... it must not be slanted.

Overall very good attempt. Cheers and carry on shooting!
HI,
Thanks for noting that, I guess no one mention that because I've mention that in the first post that I'm having difficulty aligning the horizon. :bsmilie:

Regards
SLee
 

nemesis32

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SLee said:
HI,
Thanks for noting that, I guess no one mention that because I've mention that in the first post that I'm having difficulty aligning the horizon. :bsmilie:

Regards
SLee
if you shoot in digital and have PS CS, there's a quick and easy fix. Go and use the measure tool, link one end of the horizon to the other...go to IMAGE, ROTATE CANVAS, ABITRARY and click OK. Voila.. :)
 

SLee

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Nov 5, 2005
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nemesis32 said:
if you shoot in digital and have PS CS, there's a quick and easy fix. Go and use the measure tool, link one end of the horizon to the other...go to IMAGE, ROTATE CANVAS, ABITRARY and click OK. Voila.. :)
Hi,
Thanks for that suggestion. :)
:cry: But need to wait for quite some time (long time) for me to be able to shoot in digital. :bsmilie:
 

nemesis32

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SLee said:
Hi,
Thanks for that suggestion. :)
:cry: But need to wait for quite some time (long time) for me to be able to shoot in digital. :bsmilie:
u already scan it right? if thats the case, you can still use PS to rectify the slanted horizon...
 

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