Battery Indicator turn red & back to amber


lanxer

New Member
Jan 23, 2010
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#1
Hi ,

Is it normal for the indicator to turn red.. and sometimes it turn back to amber..

If i power cycle , it also turn back to amber again
The indicator is so unstable i cant predict.
this is the first set of lithium engerizer battery given when i first bought the kx.

it also happens when i inserted anotehr 2000mha rechageable battery which is hafl charged
 

lanxer

New Member
Jan 23, 2010
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#3
yes updated to 1.01 immediately i bought it !!!
 

elavan

New Member
Sep 19, 2009
590
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AMK
#4
this also happens on k-7, may be an electronics thing/limitation, the indicator on mine lags especially after a bout of high demand..

one example is when using liveview, i'm used to seeing the indicator drop like a rock and tell me "battery depleted" and then shut off, but after awhile powering up it'll be okay..
 

airconvent

Senior Member
Apr 12, 2005
4,777
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#5
The batt checking algorithm appear to get confused when you mix your batteries. Always wait a short while when you change a different type of battery to allow the testing circuit to stabilise and detect the batteries. :)
 

ricsal

New Member
Jun 23, 2007
1,549
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#6
how to know what firmware I using?


PS: its ok. Found already.
 

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sircam

New Member
May 21, 2007
731
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#7
More important than the indicator changing colors constantly is the actual total number of shots you can take with your camera with those batteries.

It seems, from what I am reading around the Internet, that different batch numbers of K-x cameras seem to have their battery indicators behaving slightly differently. Yes, it could be normal behavior for some camera bodies out there at the moment... even for those which have been upgraded to v1.01.

Keep in mind that this bug can be further improved/tweaked with future firmware upgrades. As long as you are happy with the number of photographs you can shoot with your batteries, your camera is working fine. On a fully charged set of NiMH batteries you should be able to shoot a few hundred snaps. On a set of new lithium ions, you should be able to shoot more than a thousand.

Do keep in mind that the more you use your flash and LCD for review, the more battery power you consume which will result in lesser number of snaps for that battery set... perfectly normal behavior.
 

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lanxer

New Member
Jan 23, 2010
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#8
Its not a very fustrasting but it sure pissed me once.

I got panic when doing a photo shoot and its show me delepted.
I changed to a akaline battery and it cause me to lose some important shoots.

and i realised that my initial battery still could shoot more shots
 

Moonlightsg

Senior Member
Jan 28, 2010
764
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#9
initial battery is the 4 come with the k-x box?
that is lithium battery which perform better than akaline one for digital equipment.
try to look for lithium battery in supermark and u can compare the price different with akaline one...

i think we should use Ni-Mh recharage... which can last longer than akaline one...
try to get those sanyo one.... although it is exp... but they lost charge slowly when you are keeping it...
 

Jan 10, 2005
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#10
Its not a very fustrasting but it sure pissed me once.

I got panic when doing a photo shoot and its show me delepted.
I changed to a akaline battery and it cause me to lose some important shoots.

and i realised that my initial battery still could shoot more shots
Use either slow discharge NiMH rechargeables (like eneloops or the equivalent from other brands) or disposable lithium batteries, and ALWAYS carry another standby set. (But comparing the cost of the rechargeables to the lithiums, its a no brainer to get the rechargeables.)

I personally would never rely on alkalines as standbys.
 

sircam

New Member
May 21, 2007
731
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#11
REMEMBER THIS:

Alkalines are low-drainage batteries... suitable for low-drainage items such as wall clocks, small transistor radios, etc.
NiMH and Lithiums are high-drainage batteries... suitable for high-drainage items such as camera flashes, camera processing units, etc.

Low-drain Alkalines should actually never be used with modern day digital cameras (except during a dire emergency) because modern digicams need high-drainage capability from the batteries inside them. Flash units will also recharge much faster. Because they are low-drainage in nature, Alkalines will seem to deplete faster... but actually when you let them rest for some time, their internal chemistry will juice up again (much slower than NiMH) and then they can once again be used.

Different types of batteries are different in their internal chemistry. Once you learn about the basic types of batteries and their performance capabilities, you will be able to understand why they behave the way they do. :)
 

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