Basic Photography


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Jan 29, 2008
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#1
Hi...I am a very new into photography and would like to ask some very basic questions...

I have been playing with SLR...but my response is rather slow as I currently still playing with the trial and error method with the shutter speed, aperture, etc, to get the correct exposure, sharpness, etc...

Therefore, I would like to seek the senior's advise if there is anyway I can take better pictures while moving away from the trial and error method?
 

Legoz

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Mar 7, 2008
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#2
Use the auto mode. Works all the time. =p
 

Galdor

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Jul 5, 2006
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#3
Take a reading using the P Mode then change to M Mode and try playing around with the Aperture and Shutter speed to get a feel of how it affects your photos.

Can try shooting in A Mode or S Mode, so that the other setting will be taken care of by the cam.
 

Kit

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#4
Hi...I am a very new into photography and would like to ask some very basic questions...

I have been playing with SLR...but my response is rather slow as I currently still playing with the trial and error method with the shutter speed, aperture, etc, to get the correct exposure, sharpness, etc...

Therefore, I would like to seek the senior's advise if there is anyway I can take better pictures while moving away from the trial and error method?
You have to be more specific. Better in what sense? Technical knowledge? Compositional skils? Camera handling? Exactly what is it that you feel dissatisfied about your photos? No amount of trial and error will make you understand photography if you don't learn from those experiences.

Have you been reading about shutter speed, aperture settings, etc? You'll have to understand what they do for you before you can make them work for you. Besides taking photographs, its good to read up on some reference books just to understand the basics. It can be as easy as reading the camera manual for a start.

Take photographs and show them. That way, people can pin point exactly what's wrong and suggests ways to improve on it.
 

May 28, 2008
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#5
shoot more.... dun ever think of short cut.......

imagine ur camera only equiped with M mode..... if you want to become good, I mean real good, stick to M mode....

of course unless, when you see an UFO or Big Foot, then whatever mode also can ........
 

stjustin

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Aug 7, 2006
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#6
Keep shooting every thing at any place and any time. Take note of ppl's settings espcially apeture. And eventually u will find your niche and take time to view their works and composition of the niche:)
 

calebk

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Jul 25, 2006
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#8
You do know that exposure-wise, there is an exposure meter in your camera that tells you whether a given group of settings (aperture, ISO, shutter speed) give you correct exposure, don't you?
 

Jun 2, 2007
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Simei
#9
Reading, that's how I learn as well. Learn to compose a picture first (rules of third, etc).

I dun shoot M mode, cos I'm not that good. A photographer friend of mine shoots mainly in M.

I normally shoot A as I take more portaits. Learn to play with the aperture for dof. Seldom us S mode though which is good to freeze motion or get a sense of motion.

P mode is idiot proff.
 

zzyzx

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Aug 25, 2007
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#10
for me i started off with a prosumer cam and from there learnt wat is aperture, shutter, iso etc and how each of them affected the overall output of the picture. you can read up books etc. i feel it is very impt to know and understand the basics before going into compsition. learn to walk before run. if you dun even know how each settings affected your picture, even after 100000 snaps, maybe only 100 are acceptable ones and is by luck.
 

kenthsg

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Jul 4, 2007
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#11
Buy this book, Understanding Exposure by Bryan Peterson.
 

stubertsg

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Oct 11, 2007
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#12
To me...i shoot mainly in A mode...and M mode if I need he kind of color I want.

But S mode will be good to start with..Coz it eliminate the issue of think what Apprature to set!

Fast object...Fast Shutter.
Dim Object...Slow Shutter

hehe simple guide lines!.....shoot more and u will now more or less what shutter speed to set in future.
 

Deming86

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Mar 27, 2008
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SengKang
#14
arhh~ couldnt find that book the last time i visited the national library, but they got plenty of good books on photography too!

to TS: IMHO I think photography is about trial and error! Normally i shoot in P mode, see the results and adjust from there for optimal results! For different lighting conditions take note of the rough aperture and shutter speeds and work from there! It won't be fun if every single picture turns out perfect! Then its no diff from a PnS! Experiment and have fun! ;)
 

Deming86

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Mar 27, 2008
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SengKang
#16
hahaa.... guess its not me-proof then~ hahaa P modes pretty much a guide i guess~ :sweat:
 

iam537

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Apr 28, 2008
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#17
arhh~ couldnt find that book the last time i visited the national library, but they got plenty of good books on photography too!

to TS: IMHO I think photography is about trial and error! Normally i shoot in P mode, see the results and adjust from there for optimal results! For different lighting conditions take note of the rough aperture and shutter speeds and work from there! It won't be fun if every single picture turns out perfect! Then its no diff from a PnS! Experiment and have fun! ;)
Actually you can go to the NLB website and do a catalogue search and you can reserve it, once available they send sms or email you on the collection but there ia fee of $1.15 to pay by cash.

I am curretly reading 'The Digital Photography'' by Scott Kelby. Easy reading for noobs like me
 

gymak90

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Jan 5, 2008
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#18
Yea P is not exactly idiot-proof. You still got to select a set of settings. In fact, like for Canon, P Av Tv M are considered as 'Creative Zones.' If you want idiot-proof, go for the green rectangle:bsmilie:

Keep shooting and learn what you can do in PP. Get good composition, then let PP help you abit. Alternatively, get a book, find an area where the scene matches the pic in the book, and try taking it in the same way. ;p
 

mckenzy

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Feb 14, 2005
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#19
in the past i used to browse photo magazines, books, journals... anything i could get my hands-on... film + developing was expensive for me... digital has spoiled me/us...

a few things to get you going:
1. use manual mode
2. don't touch zooms (use your feet)
3. learn how to use a grey card
 

Deming86

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Mar 27, 2008
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SengKang
#20
Actually you can go to the NLB website and do a catalogue search and you can reserve it, once available they send sms or email you on the collection but there ia fee of $1.15 to pay by cash.

I am curretly reading 'The Digital Photography'' by Scott Kelby. Easy reading for noobs like me
ooh... $1.15... haha every cents count to satiate the BBB virus! hahaa.. Oh! I saw that book by scott kelby at Kino... had a read at it and its pretty good! But its about $20-$30.. cant remember... did you get that from the library? :bigeyes:
 

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