b/w


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clive

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#2
mainly boils down to contrast and mood

b/w outdoors: got to watch for the sky: too pale sky wll turn out as whitewash in the print. for these i use orange filter to darken the sky (it will take away a few stops of light thou)
u also got to watch for roughly how the normal colours translate into b/w..ie if ur scene is manily yellow, brown, green, pale blue => will result in a very pale-lish whitish b/w print.
ie its about how well u can anticipate the contrast to turn out 2b

but sometimes even if the colours are muted but the mood is there, the shot will still work out well
 

bsplenden

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#3
clive said:
mainly boils down to contrast and mood

b/w outdoors: got to watch for the sky: too pale sky wll turn out as whitewash in the print. for these i use orange filter to darken the sky (it will take away a few stops of light thou)
u also got to watch for roughly how the normal colours translate into b/w..ie if ur scene is manily yellow, brown, green, pale blue => will result in a very pale-lish whitish b/w print.
ie its about how well u can anticipate the contrast to turn out 2b

but sometimes even if the colours are muted but the mood is there, the shot will still work out well
what abt things such as exposure? is it the same as taking coloured?? thks
 

Witness

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eh...maybe u can PM vader....normally b&w will use coloured filters to bring out more contrast....composition is different from colour...u hav to tink in tones and shades....so even u got something bright against a white background...u hav to consider tt the while background with the bright(say flowers) will come out in almost the same tone ya...

vader is b&w pro.....got time can all go out shot together....
 

clive

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#5
bsplenden said:
what abt things such as exposure? is it the same as taking coloured?? thks

given the same scene...so far i never come across a significant diff in exposure betw colour n B/W. so i just carry on shoot as per normal..very relax one =)
 

The_Cheat

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#6
Witness said:
eh...maybe u can PM vader....normally b&w will use coloured filters to bring out more contrast....composition is different from colour...u hav to tink in tones and shades....so even u got something bright against a white background...u hav to consider tt the while background with the bright(say flowers) will come out in almost the same tone ya...

vader is b&w pro.....got time can all go out shot together....
Did vader pay you to be his marketing manager? :bsmilie: :blah: :blah:
Or have you simply fallen to the dark side? Haaa~! :bsmilie: :bsmilie:
 

clive

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lolzz...he just recommend to consult vader for more detailed skills..hehe
 

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Film is rated for speed and the ISO rating is irrespective of BW / Color / CCD...

My 2c worth: If you are interested in getting BW as the final image, shoot color negs and desaturate in PS. Using BW film needs more work / measuring the development times etc... It is fun but you should be vary of this and it will be a long while before you get resonable prints.

cheers
 

bsplenden

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#9
RemAcuTetigisti said:
Film is rated for speed and the ISO rating is irrespective of BW / Color / CCD...

My 2c worth: If you are interested in getting BW as the final image, shoot color negs and desaturate in PS. Using BW film needs more work / measuring the development times etc... It is fun but you should be vary of this and it will be a long while before you get resonable prints.

cheers
u mean b/w cannot be developed in those normal developing shops???
 

clive

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kodak tcn400 and ILFORD xp2 super are 2 such films that are c-41 process . ie can just shoot n give to normal lab to process

other films like tri-x, t-max, etc all need to use traditional b/w darkroom skills
 

zekai

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#11
Witness said:
eh...maybe u can PM vader....normally b&w will use coloured filters to bring out more contrast....composition is different from colour...u hav to tink in tones and shades....so even u got something bright against a white background...u hav to consider tt the while background with the bright(say flowers) will come out in almost the same tone ya...

vader is b&w pro.....got time can all go out shot together....
In B/W the tonal details become very important. if we have red and grey in the same object and they are of the same tonal level... in B/W you will lose the detail. So may need to use colored filter to bring out the tonal difference or rather create it.
 

behyx

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#12
bro, just to help you a little on using filters for BW photography:


Y2 (K2) - Wratten #8
A yellow filter, good for landscapes, general outdoor photography and sports. Blocks UV up to 485nm. Increases contrast between sky and clouds. Great as a general B/W filter and works very well with stone and brick etc in full sun. Also used with Ektachrome IR films. Filter factor 2.

Y3 - Wratten #12
An Orange filter, good for landscapes, architecture etc. Darkens sky and increases contrast significantly. Brightens Yellow tones. Blocks UV to 535nm. Also used with Ektachrome IR film. Filter factor 3.

Y0 - Wratten #16
A Yellow Orange filter. Great for Caucasian skin, and clears up skin tones wonderfully, especially freckles. Darkens up skies noticably in landscape shots and produces very good thunderstorm like clouds. Blocks UV to 545nm and can be used with Ektachrome IR film. Filter factor 2.5

R25 (R8) Wratten #25
A dark red filter. Great for landscapes, darkens Violet, Blue and greens. Produces stunning clouds and skies. Ideally suited for mountain and cloud photography. Lightens reds and oranges. Also used for Ektachrome IR film. Blocks UV to 600nm and has a filter factor of 6-8.

X0 (YG2,5) Wratten #550 (from memory)
Yellow-Green filter that's ideally suited for landscapes, creates greater distinctions between hues of green. Also excellent for outdoor portraiture with clean tinted skin tones and accentuated lips (Caucasian skin tones). Filter factor 2.5

X1 - Wratten #11
Green filter that's excellent for meadow and forest seperation in landscape photography. Also good for outdoor portraiture with soft lighting and backlight scenes. Filter factor 4. Can also be used to correct for tungsten light in B/W photography.


source: Ian (http://forums.clubsnap.org/showthread.php?t=9208&highlight=Tungsten+Filter)
 

Witness

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#13
wah.....tt's veri detailed haha...anyway cheat....i not advertising for him lo....its juz true tt b&w ask vader wat....haha....
 

bsplenden

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#14
wow.. so much things... and i thought taking with coloured film is hard... :embrass:

shld i master colour first or b/w first? cos i am interested in both as i believe that each kind of film is used to bring out the effect in diff situation. or shld i try both at the same time? :dunno:
 

behyx

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#15
bsplenden said:
wow.. so much things... and i thought taking with coloured film is hard... :embrass:

shld i master colour first or b/w first? cos i am interested in both as i believe that each kind of film is used to bring out the effect in diff situation. or shld i try both at the same time? :dunno:
it's not a matter of which one comes first or what, it boils down to yourself, your personal preference. in photography there's no need to rush, just take your time. study as much photos as u can, develop and implement your own style.
 

bsplenden

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#16
behyx said:
it's not a matter of which one comes first or what, it boils down to yourself, your personal preference. in photography there's no need to rush, just take your time. study as much photos as u can, develop and implement your own style.
o... i just thought that i shld master the easier one since i don't have any preference as i am ok with either... think i feel enlightened now... keke.. ;) thks! i will try as much as time and money allows...
 

behyx

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#17
bsplenden said:
o... i just thought that i shld master the easier one since i don't have any preference as i am ok with either... think i feel enlightened now... keke.. ;) thks! i will try as much as time and money allows...
I'm glad that you're inspired. :)

if u r rich, just burn your shots on film and practice till u get it right. :D
if u r not rich, simply visualize. our brains are the best camera anyone can ever own! draw a visual image in your head when you see something nice, and imagine if u have a camera at that moment, how will you compose your picture, where to meter it to get the best exposure reading, and what squeeze into the 35mm film and what not to.

enjoy photography! :)
 

sfhuang

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#18
The only filter you really need for b&w is the red for getting dramatic skies. But if you're street shooting you don't need any filters. Any compensation/adjustments can be done in the dark room.

Taking b&w pictures is the same technically as taking colour. You're still shooting with a camera and lens. The difference as some have correctly pointed out is the way you see things and correspondingly compose the picture. It's easy to take b&w but very, very difficult to take well.
 

vader

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#19
clive said:
given the same scene...so far i never come across a significant diff in exposure betw colour n B/W. so i just carry on shoot as per normal..very relax one =)
Yes you are right. But I usually expose for the shadows...that means I'll over expose the negs by 1/3 to 1/2 stops...when I print the pics I'll expose for the shadows and burn in the highlights...I feel that it's easy to do this way. :cool:
 

Tiffy

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#20
vader said:
Yes you are right. But I usually expose for the shadows...that means I'll over expose the negs by 1/3 to 1/2 stops...when I print the pics I'll expose for the shadows and burn in the highlights...I feel that it's easy to do this way. :cool:
wow b&w consultant..good good i love b&w as well :lovegrin:
need more advice...
 

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