B+W filter


picky

New Member
Nov 25, 2004
308
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0
#1
Hi,
I have plan want to buy UV filter from B+W and noticed there are two different type of UV filter.

1) UVA HazeMRC Filter
2) Digital Pro UV/IR Blocking #486 Glass Filter. It said Its filter factor is 1

What are the difference and more useful to minimize those glaring when taking photo?
What is the meaning of "filter factor is 1" ?

Seeking for your opinion/advise

byee :)
 

Cowseye

Senior Member
Mar 7, 2010
3,786
0
0
Singapore
www.ttlo-cowseye.com
#2
picky said:
Hi,
I have plan want to buy UV filter from B+W and noticed there are two different type of UV filter.

1) UVA HazeMRC Filter
2) Digital Pro UV/IR Blocking #486 Glass Filter. It said Its filter factor is 1

What are the difference and more useful to minimize those glaring when taking photo?
What is the meaning of "filter factor is 1" ?

Seeking for your opinion/advise

byee :)
I believe these 2 are very different filter. The first one is a normal but high grade UV filter while the 2nd one is an IR filter on top of being a uv filter (I'm not very sure abt this piece). Search a bit on Infra-red photography to get an answer.
 

dandoodle

New Member
Apr 27, 2011
53
0
0
SG, Melbourne
#3
Correct me if Im wrong but all DSLRs have IR filter for the sensor. Would you still need an IR filter? I think the UVA Haze MRC filter should suffice. I have one of this. It's great and easy to clean. Tried Tokina once and spent more time wiping it clean than using it.

There's also B+W technical support at their website where you can drop in your queries and have a response usually within a couple of days.

Hope that helps
 

daredevil123

Moderator
Staff member
Oct 25, 2005
21,657
68
48
lil red dot
#4
Hi,
I have plan want to buy UV filter from B+W and noticed there are two different type of UV filter.

1) UVA HazeMRC Filter
2) Digital Pro UV/IR Blocking #486 Glass Filter. It said Its filter factor is 1

What are the difference and more useful to minimize those glaring when taking photo?
What is the meaning of "filter factor is 1" ?

Seeking for your opinion/advise

byee :)
I believe these 2 are very different filter. The first one is a normal but high grade UV filter while the 2nd one is an IR filter on top of being a uv filter (I'm not very sure abt this piece). Search a bit on Infra-red photography to get an answer.
IR photography uses filters that block out all light except IR.

The 486 blocks IR light. No point getting 486, unless you have a specific need to remove IR waves.
 

Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
19,105
12
0
#6
What are the difference and more useful to minimize those glaring when taking photo?
What is the meaning of "filter factor is 1" ?
First you need to know that there is a difference between glare and flare.

To minimize flare, you should use NO FILTER. Every filter adds a glass element, essentially another reflective surface.

Glare is like the bright reflection of the sun off of water or snow - for this, a CPL filter is best.
 

spree86

Senior Member
Feb 3, 2009
4,774
0
0
Bishan
www.flickr.com
#7
Cowseye said:
I believe these 2 are very different filter. The first one is a normal but high grade UV filter while the 2nd one is an IR filter on top of being a uv filter (I'm not very sure abt this piece). Search a bit on Infra-red photography to get an answer.
The 2nd one is not an IR filter, in fact, it removes IR rays, searching on IR photography won't help. IR filters are usually 650nm and above
 

picky

New Member
Nov 25, 2004
308
0
0
#8
Thank you so much for all opinions... so now I can decide correctly what I need.
Surely I don't need 486..


BTW,
B+W UV haze filter which means to minimize "haze or foggy" effect especially when taking outdoor at Genting huh?
 

Last edited:

spree86

Senior Member
Feb 3, 2009
4,774
0
0
Bishan
www.flickr.com
#9
picky said:
Thank you so much for all opinions... so now I can decide correctly what I need.
Surely I don't it 486..

BTW,
B+W UV haze filter which means to minimize "haze or foggy" effect especially when taking outdoor at Genting huh?
It was used to block of uv ray back in thefilm days to reduce haziness. In a digital camera, its function is more of a protective glass as the camera itself already filtered off uv rays
 

Octarine

Moderator
Staff member
Jan 3, 2008
12,517
30
48
Pasir Ris
#10
B+W UV haze filter which means to minimize "haze or foggy" effect especially when taking outdoor at Genting huh?
Haze is stray light, caused by humidity, dust and other things in the air that reflect sunlight. Since they also affect the polarization of the light any CPL will be more useful. But do read up about CPL filters, pay attention to the position of the sun for maximum filter effect (which is not always required, though).
 

kirkteo

New Member
Jul 3, 2010
181
0
0
Singapore
#11
The 1st option is a UV blocking filter, the 2nd option is both a UV and IR blocking filter. but most new DSLR comes with IR Blocking filter(Very strong). so you do not need another IR blocking filter. I'd say the 1st option is good enough.

For IR photography people, I use a IR passing filter, which allows all IR to pass through, but block some or all colors in the spectrum, depending on which nm you chooses.
 

kirkteo

New Member
Jul 3, 2010
181
0
0
Singapore
#12
If I'm not wrong, there is also another type of photography call UV photography which uses UV passing filter to capture, it is not popular as
1) The filter is very expensive, probably no demand
2) The picture output will be all glowing, similar to using UV tube on your currency, you see some parts glow.
Thus, a normal UV filter can also cut off some unwanted glow or haze for very particular photographers, but I agree, nowadays people use it more of protection to your lens. imagine paying few hundreds or thousands for your lens compare to putting a cheap $40 UV filter.
 

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