B&W Film photography: how to INCREASE grain size?


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tingchiyen

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Dear all, am thinking of getting a gritty, "newsreel" kind of effect from B&W film, ie. large grains, for industrial/work related portraits without having to waste expensive 1600 ASA film... is there any way i can do that by either pushing standard 100 or 400 ASA negatives, or by over-exposing, or by using filters etc. without resorting to DI?
 

The_Cheat

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#2
tingchiyen said:
Dear all, am thinking of getting a gritty, "newsreel" kind of effect from B&W film, ie. large grains, for industrial/work related portraits without having to waste expensive 1600 ASA film... is there any way i can do that by either pushing standard 100 or 400 ASA negatives, or by over-exposing, or by using filters etc. without resorting to DI?
Hmm... 1600 film ain't that expensive what!? :eek:
In fact, I'd just gotten Ilford Delta 3200 ASA at $6 from Ruby. Do you think it's expensive?

Err... I don't think I'd answered your question, did I? :embrass:
 

J

jcryan55

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#3
In fact, u can control the grain structure by varying the film developers or the procedures during developing. Of course, that's if u develop the film yourself. If u send out to be developed, I don't think they would bother as it does not make commercial sense.

try using Rodinal and agitate it more vigorously during the developing process. I guarantee u will get ISO1600 grain with even ISO100 film. The last time I heard someone over agitated and the film went blank. Not sure how it happens.
Also try to use @large@ grain developer like Rodinal instead of the super fine grain developer like Microdol X & Perceptol. The higher the developing temperature also give u bigger grains.

In short, it's the interplay of the various elements mentioned above to get the desired effects that u want. Have fun experimenting. If u don;t get it at first try again & again and again.
 

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#6
you can try pushing to get large grains but your contrast may increase too, best is to trial and error
 

tingchiyen

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Now THAT is actually really helpful! :bsmilie:
As in, ASA 100 push to ASA 50? Or 400 to 50?
 

sriram

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A lot depends on the developer. When I wanted large grain I would shoot Agfa APX 400 and develop it in Rodinal. You can also try HP5+ souped in Rodinal. I've done APX 400 shot at 1600 in Rodinal and it is REALLY grainy.
 

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tingchiyen said:
Now THAT is actually really helpful! :bsmilie:
As in, ASA 100 push to ASA 50? Or 400 to 50?
nope, that's pulling, pushing as in 400 push to say 800 or 1600, etc.

there are quite a few factors determining grain size, developer used, temperature, developer concentration, pushing, reticulation, film used.

I suggest you simply use a ISO 400 film, say trix or hp5+ and dev as normal and see if the grains are good enuff for you b4 you try other methods.
 

mervlam

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#10
use Rodinal, agitate vigorously, using room temperature water = big grains
 

tingchiyen

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#11
Righto, everyone, thanks for chiming in. Haven't got time or the set-up for developing my own b&w's, but have been talking to the lab pple i go to and they suggest pushing ASA 400 to 800... or even from 100 to 800. So hoppinghippo's spot on. Will keep the Rodinal in mind when i get my own mini-darkroom kit. :thumbsup:
 

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tingchiyen said:
Righto, everyone, thanks for chiming in. Haven't got time or the set-up for developing my own b&w's, but have been talking to the lab pple i go to and they suggest pushing ASA 400 to 800... or even from 100 to 800. So hoppinghippo's spot on. Will keep the Rodinal in mind when i get my own mini-darkroom kit. :thumbsup:

eeerrrmmm... actually like I said I do suggest trying normal film with stated ISO as your EI first before doing anything else. and pushing your film WILL give you higher contrast which may not be what you want so I suggest you try more physical methods first like the rest have said. either way its fun!! so enjoy! :bsmilie:
 

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