at least at ISO 800


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#1
Guys,

Whenever i shoot indoor, i'll have to set my ISO to at least 400, more often to 800 in order to get the right expoure (based on the metering in the camera). Speed is at not more than 1/30. I'm using D70 and the kit len. And SB-80

Is this normal?

Thanks for your answers in advance
 

#2
Guys,

Whenever i shoot indoor, i'll have to set my ISO to at least 400, more often to 800 in order to get the right expoure (based on the metering in the camera). Speed is at not more than 1/30. I'm using D70 and the kit len. And SB-80

Is this normal?

Thanks for your answers in advance
Dont think so

Im usually at:
ISO200-400
1/100
F/6-8
 

Artosoft

Senior Member
Aug 31, 2005
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#3
Guys,

Whenever i shoot indoor, i'll have to set my ISO to at least 400, more often to 800 in order to get the right expoure (based on the metering in the camera). Speed is at not more than 1/30. I'm using D70 and the kit len. And SB-80

Is this normal?

Thanks for your answers in advance
When you are using flash, it is depend on distance between your subject and camera. Also depend on aperture you are using and what is the GN power of the flash used.

Regards,
Arto.
 

Apr 20, 2006
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#5
Guys,

Whenever i shoot indoor, i'll have to set my ISO to at least 400, more often to 800 in order to get the right expoure (based on the metering in the camera). Speed is at not more than 1/30. I'm using D70 and the kit len. And SB-80

Is this normal?

Thanks for your answers in advance
It is normal.
Other people may shoot differently, but that's them.
As long as you are properly exposed, it's ok.
 

#6
hey guys,

thanks for all your replies.

the indoor here refers to our typical hdb or similar environment. distance between subject and camera also typical , maybe 2 - 3 meters. i'm concern with this as my pix often turned out to be very noisy with this 800 ISO. btw, i'm already at the lowest aperture f4 / f5. and finally, at speed of not more than 1/30, i also often get blur pictures leh

how huh??? please help. what can i do?
 

Apr 20, 2006
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#7
You have 2 choices. Either you use a high ISO or alter the lighting with Flash. I prefer high ISO anytime, unless there are shadows under the noses, eyes, etc...

Flash lighting is unnatural and unsightly most of the time. It is difficult to control the flash such that it looks good.

As for the noise... it's camera and lighting dependent. I use a 350D, and the noise level is acceptable to me. There are also tools to correct the noise, like Noise Ninja, for example. I shoot high ISO and use Noise Ninja a lot.

Some people like that Flashed-Out look... but that's a matter of taste, and I don't want to get into an argument regarding taste.
 

ExplorerZ

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Jan 9, 2006
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hkchew03.deviantart.com
#8
hey guys,

thanks for all your replies.

the indoor here refers to our typical hdb or similar environment. distance between subject and camera also typical , maybe 2 - 3 meters. i'm concern with this as my pix often turned out to be very noisy with this 800 ISO. btw, i'm already at the lowest aperture f4 / f5. and finally, at speed of not more than 1/30, i also often get blur pictures leh

how huh??? please help. what can i do?
get a flash or a fast lens... 50/f1.8
 

knpan

Senior Member
May 2, 2006
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#9
u cant say if its normal or not lol. it depends on the lighting situation, the distance of yoru subject etc
 

Chris Lim

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Oct 24, 2005
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#10
use noise ninja. :) very often i find myself using ISO 800 only during weddings when the couple march in or when the lights are dim. like wat some of the ppl alr suggest. get a faster lens to prevent handshake or a better flash with a higher output level.
 

Apr 20, 2006
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#11
get a flash or a fast lens... 50/f1.8

Oh yes... fast lens. But for indoor, 50mm may be too long, especially on a 1.6x crop.

For indoor night, I normally use the 35mm f/2. But when you do a wide aperture, you have to worry about the Depth of Field.

There's no magic solution to this. Lighting, exposure, DOF, etc... these are things that photographers have to worry about all the time. Just work within your constraints and do your best.

Don't get into the habit of acquiring more equipment than your photographic skills can handle. Many people in CS are guilty of that. Owning more equipment, like big flash unit, fast lenses... do not make you a good photographer. Sometimes, when the lighting is poor, let the shot go. More to the next point with good light and get ready. Compose well, and capture the good ones.
 

Henessy

Senior Member
Feb 1, 2006
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www.henessyphoto.blogspot.com
#12
use noise ninja. :) very often i find myself using ISO 800 only during weddings when the couple march in or when the lights are dim. like wat some of the ppl alr suggest. get a faster lens to prevent handshake or a better flash with a higher output level.
But a faster lens will cause you to have a shallow depth of field.
 

lsisaxon

Senior Member
Nov 29, 2004
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#14
hey guys,

thanks for all your replies.

the indoor here refers to our typical hdb or similar environment. distance between subject and camera also typical , maybe 2 - 3 meters. i'm concern with this as my pix often turned out to be very noisy with this 800 ISO. btw, i'm already at the lowest aperture f4 / f5. and finally, at speed of not more than 1/30, i also often get blur pictures leh

how huh??? please help. what can i do?
Day or night? Are there any windows for lighting to come in? What's the lighting situation like?
 

ExplorerZ

Senior Member
Jan 9, 2006
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hkchew03.deviantart.com
#15
Oh yes... fast lens. But for indoor, 50mm may be too long, especially on a 1.6x crop.

For indoor night, I normally use the 35mm f/2. But when you do a wide aperture, you have to worry about the Depth of Field.

There's no magic solution to this. Lighting, exposure, DOF, etc... these are things that photographers have to worry about all the time. Just work within your constraints and do your best.

Don't get into the habit of acquiring more equipment than your photographic skills can handle. Many people in CS are guilty of that. Owning more equipment, like big flash unit, fast lenses... do not make you a good photographer. Sometimes, when the lighting is poor, let the shot go. More to the next point with good light and get ready. Compose well, and capture the good ones.
depends on what you are shooting, 50mm would be good for head/shoulder portrait. 35mm f2 is also good only thing is the price.
 

Snowcrash

New Member
Jan 18, 2002
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#16
hey guys,

thanks for all your replies.

the indoor here refers to our typical hdb or similar environment. distance between subject and camera also typical , maybe 2 - 3 meters. i'm concern with this as my pix often turned out to be very noisy with this 800 ISO. btw, i'm already at the lowest aperture f4 / f5. and finally, at speed of not more than 1/30, i also often get blur pictures leh

how huh??? please help. what can i do?
Take a look at some local wedding photographers website for your typical hdb environment. Some use flash, some use window light with bigger aperture lens. Most important some know when not to shoot as the light is not bright enough.

Happy shooting!
 

Dann

Senior Member
Mar 27, 2004
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#17
Guys,

Whenever i shoot indoor, i'll have to set my ISO to at least 400, more often to 800 in order to get the right expoure (based on the metering in the camera). Speed is at not more than 1/30. I'm using D70 and the kit len. And SB-80

Is this normal?

Thanks for your answers in advance
For indoor hdb enviroment ur settings seem a bit on the high side if you r using flash.
Esp if subject is only 2-3 meters.
What kind of pics are u taking anyway? :think:
 

Maltese

New Member
Mar 21, 2005
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#18
its normal...sometimes I even go to ISO1600 in dinner lightings. As long as the photo u have taken is ok with u, don't really need to care so much about what combination u are using. It could just be the equipment. Some higher precision models are able to detect light better hence they can give u a more accurate settings resulting in higher ISO or lower shutter speed.
 

Apr 20, 2006
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#19
depends on what you are shooting, 50mm would be good for head/shoulder portrait. 35mm f2 is also good only thing is the price.
That's generally true, but practically, it is usually not possible to switch lens so quickly on the run. So, I opt for the wider one and let my feet do the rest. That's the main problem with prime... else I'd be on prime all the time.

35mm f2 costs about $320 used. Price is OK lah... considering the construction. The 50mm f1.8 MkII is cheap, but construction-wise, it's a toy. If you can find a MkI, it costs about the same as the 35mm anyway.

Nowadays, I use only the 24-85mm and the 35mm... and when I shoot weddings (as a family member), my shots usually turn out better than those so-called 'pros'. At least my wife and I think so. But of course, I get fewer usable ones since I am usually also a participant in those events. :)

If I were pro, I'd probably use 2 bodies and 2 lenses. A 16-35mm and a 70-200mm should do the trick. Then I'd use my feet to cover anything in between. But I'm not a pro and I have no intention to go down that road... and hence there is no need to spend that kind of money.
 

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