Arowana in Aquarium


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mms102304

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Apr 30, 2008
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#1
Hi bros, i've been struggling to take a shot of my arowana on an aquarium but failed miserably :cry:. Problem is the reflection on the glass. If i dont use flash (built-in) the picture is too dark coz i'm using fast shutter speed to freeze the movement of my fish :confused:. Can you recommend the best camera set-up for the job? I only have a nikon d80 kit lens (18mm-135mm) and a 50mm f/1.8. Don't have an external flash unit. Thanks.
 

yZong

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Aug 18, 2006
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长山
#3
1. Get a CPL filter
2. If no flash, make sure you setup enuff lightings around your tank.
 

JacePhoto

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Oct 1, 2007
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#4
Tape majong paper at the back of the tank. Fire a flash (if you have) from behind. Use the wireless commander in D80 to trigger flash but cover the front flash with paper.

See picture for sample: http://www.flickr.com/photos/1000words-com-sg/2480433088/

If you dont have a flash, put fish tank with its back to sunlight. Put majong paper. You should be able to get decent exposure.

Hope this helps.
 

Daikoku

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May 19, 2005
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#5
-Link an external flash to your d80 with a off camera cord..
-put the flash at the top of the aquarium firing downwards into the tank of water..
-use a marco lens ( if possible )

That should do the trick
 

Dec 7, 2006
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west side!
#6
shoot with the 50mm at f1.8
use manual mode.
push ur iso to 400 - 800
dun use ur onboard flash.
dun bother buying CPL as it will not help much.
ensure that there's a strong overhead light in ur aquarium.
use a tripod and try shooting at angles instead of straight on.
 

speck

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Jan 20, 2006
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#7
yup, use iso 800 and above and large aperture in order to have
the shutter speed fast enough to prevent blur from the fish movement.
don't use flash and make sure aquarium setting has enough lights.
cpl won't help much. use af-c focus. not the best examples but here
are mine.








oh yeah, one more thing..make sure you take the pics after you have done wc
so that the water is crystal clear and not cloudy..:)
 

Edwan

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Jan 13, 2007
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#8
OT but your first pic is sharp :)
 

moby

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Apr 8, 2005
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#9
I think there are sufficient advice already. Boils down to sufficient lighting to get fast shutter speed.

To prevent reflection, dont use on camera flash. Go buy an external flash such as SB600 and take with flash on top of the tank.

Your D80 has the wireless flash function, make full use of it. :)
 

mms102304

New Member
Apr 30, 2008
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#10
Thanks bros :D. You've been really great in helping and providing information to newbies like me. Not to mention the full support you show to all CS members. :thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:
 

mms102304

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Apr 30, 2008
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#11
Bro Speck, great pictures by the way :thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:
 

Henessy

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Feb 1, 2006
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#12
yup, use iso 800 and above and large aperture in order to have
the shutter speed fast enough to prevent blur from the fish movement.
don't use flash and make sure aquarium setting has enough lights.
cpl won't help much. use af-c focus. not the best examples but here
are mine.








oh yeah, one more thing..make sure you take the pics after you have done wc
so that the water is crystal clear and not cloudy..:)
This pics are awesome. Mind elaborating more on how you take it.
 

nulbonklr

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Dec 1, 2007
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#14
yup, use iso 800 and above and large aperture in order to have
the shutter speed fast enough to prevent blur from the fish movement.
don't use flash and make sure aquarium setting has enough lights.
cpl won't help much. use af-c focus. not the best examples but here
are mine.








oh yeah, one more thing..make sure you take the pics after you have done wc
so that the water is crystal clear and not cloudy..
Very nice aros :thumbsup:

;p........
 

catchlights

Moderator
Staff member
Sep 27, 2004
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www.foto-u.com
#15
the basic principle is to light the tank from the top, and make outside the tank as dark as possible, so you will not have any reflection one the front panel.

btw light come from the top is the most natural way, in real life, no natural light are coming from the side or bottom in the water.

flash is preferable, as if you are using continuous light, it has to be very strong, so enable you to have a higher shutter speed, till you able to stop the movement of the fish, this is far worst than using flash to shoot the fish.

and also, PL filter is useless here, it will not work well when you are shooting perpendicular with the fish tank.

hope this help.
 

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